Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPlastic Bags
IN THE NEWS

Plastic Bags

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
May 26, 2012
Re "L.A. OKs ban on plastic bags at checkout," May 24 It's troubling to see the Los Angeles City Council regulate commerce under the guise of protecting the environment. Not only is it affecting business in a negative way with its plastic-bag ban, but it is also imposing a fee on the consumer by mandating a charge on paper bags for them to complete their purchase. The only ones who will benefit economically from this ban will be the makers of reusable bags, many of which are located overseas in countries such as China.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Corona Police found a deceased newborn girl wrapped in plastic bags inside a trash dumpster Tuesday, officials said. Authorities said they were led to the dumpster by the mother, who told police she thought the baby was stillborn at the time of the birth and decided to throw her away. The mother, who was not named and has not been charged at this time, showed up at Kaiser Permanente's Riverside Medical Center on Tuesday evening claiming she had been "injured. " During an examination, staff came to the conclusion that she had likely recently given birth and called police.
Advertisement
OPINION
December 1, 2013
Re "Hard data on plastic bags," Editorial, Nov. 27 The Times' suggestion of a study to determine the effects of plastic-bag bans on the municipalities in California that have passed them is an excellent idea. But let's make sure it is truly objective. The study should consider the overall life-cycle impacts of plastic versus reusable bags, including their impact on the environment, jobs and society in general. For example, will cases of salmonella and other food-borne diseases increase because of the greater use of reusable fabric bags?
OPINION
February 13, 2014
Re "Ban's not quite in the bag," Column, Feb. 11 Plastic bags aren't banned where I live in Florida, but it's just as easy, and more responsible, for me to sit my stash of tote bags on my porch and grab them when I go grocery shopping. In the book "One Can Make a Difference," filmmaker Rebecca Hosking - who made the documentary "Hawaii: Message in the Waves" - explains that more than 100,000 birds and marine animals die every year after they mistake floating plastic bags for food and eat them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2008 | By Jean-Paul Renaud, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County supervisors backed off a threat Tuesday to ban plastic shopping and grocery bags that environmental experts call unsightly and destructive. Instead, officials chose the weakest of five alternatives recommended by county executives: a volunteer program that leaves it to supermarket and store owners to coax customers into packing their purchases in reusable containers. FOR THE RECORD: Plastic bags: An article in Wednesday's California section about a Los Angeles County initiative regarding plastic bags described the alternative that supervisors agreed upon, to impose a ban on the bags only if supermarkets do not meet specified benchmarks by 2013, as the weakest of five alternatives.
OPINION
May 2, 2013
Re "Slap a fee on carry-out bags," Editorial, April 30 In your editorial about plastic bags, you omitted discussing another way in which those bags are utilized. Those of us who are responsible dog owners use plastic bags to dispose of our pets' droppings, in accordance with local law. I, for one, find plastic grocery bags to be of convenient assistance in being a responsible citizen. Robert G. Brewer Sherman Oaks ALSO: Letters: A 'cranky' Gov. Brown Letters: Getting into and out of Israel Letters: Mexico's hypocrisy on border security
OPINION
April 30, 2010 | Tim Shestek
It is no surprise that the organization representing makers of plastic grocery bags takes issue with your April 16 editorial urging the state to pass a new tax on bags. We simply believe that asking Sacramento to levy a draconian tax that amounts to about 1,250% of a plastic bag's value is out of line, and that all of us in California instead should focus on increasing plastic bag recycling. Plastic bag makers don't begrudge the rapid rise of reusable grocery bags and have no objection to encouraging their use. Now that nearly every major retailer sells inexpensive reusable bags (some even give them away)
OPINION
July 10, 2010 | By Stan Joffe and Jeanine Harris
The June 29 Blowback by Peter Grande of Command Packaging, a manufacturer of plastic bags, offered an articulate critique of the state's proposed ban on single-use plastic bags at certain stores. Unfortunately, the information he outlined did not provide a full examination of the facts. Earthwise Bag Co., headquartered in Los Angeles County, is one of the leading suppliers of reusable bags to major grocers and retailers throughout the United States. As a California employer, one of several reusable bag makers in the state and environmentally conscious residents of this state, we feel compelled to respond.
OPINION
June 19, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Now that the Los Angeles City Council has tentatively approved a ban on plastic carry-out bags, I'd like to report to you that it'll be easy to live without them. I'd like to say that after a similar ban took effect in my city this year, I had no problem getting my groceries to the car, no problem lining my garbage cans and no moments of annoyance. Truth is, though, it can be a pain. Sometimes, you just crave a flimsy wisp of plastic with built-in handles to carry out the trash, or to hold some messy item that should not see the inside of a backpack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Catherine Saillant and Matt Stevens
Attention Los Angeles shoppers: The plastic bag is disappearing from more than just the supermarket. L.A. on Tuesday became the newest and by far the largest city to back a ban on plastic grocery bags, approving an ordinance that applies not just to food stores and mini-marts but also big retail chains with their own groceries, such as Target and Wal-Mart. The ordinance, which has been in the works for years, will go into effect gradually, reaching large stores Jan. 1 and smaller ones July 1, 2014.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Ted Rall
It looks to be the end of the plastic grocery bag as we know it, at least in California. The Assembly appears to have struck a deal in which Californians would pay at least a dime for each recycled paper or reusable plastic bag they get at the grocery store. The currently ubiquitous single-use plastic bags that have bedeviled litter-control types and environmentalists would be prohibited. That's a lot of bags. Californians use an estimated 12 billion single-use plastic bags each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Many more Californians would have to pay for paper or reusable plastic bags at the grocery store under a new agreement by key state lawmakers that would ban other plastic bags. After three unsuccessful attempts to outlaw single-use plastic grocery bags statewide, legislators announced a compromise Thursday that they said appears headed for passage. Their proposal would impose a 10-cent fee on alternative bags while banning single-use plastic bags. "This breaks a decade-long deadlock on a statewide solution," said Mark Murray, executive director of Californians Against Waste.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Ted Rall
On New Year's Day, Los Angeles became the biggest city in the United State to ban plastic bags. Mayhem was anticipated. OK, not mayhem. Just extreme agitation. "If they don't give me a bag, what am I going to do?" The Times quoted an "incredulous" William Macary as saying at a Wal-Mart back in June. "If I pay money, I want a bag. " I feel for him. If I pay money, I want a pony. And a car. And those $350 Italian shirts I lust for when I go to Vegas. YEAR IN REVIEW: Ted Rall's five best cartoons of 2013 Believe it or not, plastic bags were originally introduced as the eco-friendly alternative to paper bags.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
For Los Angeles residents, the perfect holiday gift this year might have been a reusable grocery bag. On Wednesday, large grocery stores will be prohibited by law from providing free plastic bags. Shoppers will be required to bring their own bags when stocking up on food and goods, or pay 10 cents per paper bag provided by the grocery store. Smaller independent markets and liquor stores that sell groceries will become subject to the ban July 1. In backing the new law, Los Angeles City Council members cited concerns that the flimsy disposable bags often end up on city streets and eventually find their way to the ocean, where they threaten fish and wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Some Los Angeles grocery store customers will have to adjust to a lifestyle change come Jan. 1, when a ban on plastic bags takes effect. As of Wednesday, the thin, seemingly ubiquitous carryalls will be illegal for all large grocers to distribute. Small markets must follow suit in July. Customers will have to bring their own bags, buy reusable ones or purchase paper bags for 10 cents apiece. When L.A. passed its plastic bag ban in June, it became the nation's largest city to take this step.
OPINION
December 1, 2013
Re "Hard data on plastic bags," Editorial, Nov. 27 The Times' suggestion of a study to determine the effects of plastic-bag bans on the municipalities in California that have passed them is an excellent idea. But let's make sure it is truly objective. The study should consider the overall life-cycle impacts of plastic versus reusable bags, including their impact on the environment, jobs and society in general. For example, will cases of salmonella and other food-borne diseases increase because of the greater use of reusable fabric bags?
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Karin Klein
Every year, it seems, the California Legislature can't bring itself to pass meaningful legislation to reduce the number of plastic carryout bags in the state. On year, in fact, the Legislature bowed to the industry and instead of allowing a small fee on the bags, banned cities from imposing fees on them. That's too bad because, as the Times editorial board has pointed out numerous times, a small fee on the bags is the better way to go, as fees in such diverse places as Ireland and IKEA have shown.
OPINION
May 22, 2012
The City Council on Wednesday will consider whether to ban stores in Los Angeles from offering single-use plastic carry-out bags. A ban would take some getting used to, but examples from other jurisdictions, including the unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County, show that it can be done and that shoppers and stores quickly adapt. A ban is the right move. The council should adopt it. For a city with such a strong environmental ethic, Los Angeles is lagging on the plastic bag issue.
OPINION
December 1, 2013
Re "Volunteer chic," Nov. 27 Having served the working poor and homeless all of my adult life, I have mixed feelings about the fanfare that Thanksgiving generosity receives. To be sure, it is great that wealthy donors buy turkeys for a soup kitchen or that famous chefs prepare the meals. It is also wonderful that many people sacrifice part of their holiday to serve those who are in need. But the working poor and homeless will need you tomorrow, next Thursday and all of the Thursdays in June.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Here's something to celebrate for New Year's Day 2013: The city of L.A.  is finally banning plastic bags . Goodbye, and high time too, to those wispy, blow-away plastic bags that wind up in all the wrong places, from treetops to sea turtles' bellies. Happily, the trope that is “paper or plastic?” will become as meaningless as “23 skidoo.” But dear city fathers (and our one city mother, there being only one female elected official in City Hall), can we please, please, not blow this fantastic marketing opportunity and wind up looking lame once again?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|