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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1988
Mayor Tom Bradley's administration Wednesday ordered four city departments to halt all purchases of products made of polystyrene foam because they cannot be recycled. In a letter signed by Bradley's chief of staff, Mike Gage, the Los Angeles General Services, Airport, Harbor and Water and Power departments were told that "a coffee cup made of polystyrene foam that is used for only a few minutes will continue to burden the environment for hundreds of years." Gage also asked City Atty.
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NEWS
May 26, 1988 | Associated Press
The Senate voted Wednesday to outlaw the manufacture, sale and possession of handguns made from plastic or other materials that could pass through metal detectors. The legislation, primarily aimed at terrorists and air pirates, also would require that all toy guns have orange plugs in their barrels so they cannot be mistaken for real weapons. "There is no doubt that in the hands of terrorists and other criminals, undetectable weapons are a clear threat," said Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.
NEWS
November 11, 1988
President Reagan signed a bill banning the manufacture, sale or possession of plastic guns or any other firearms that can elude detection. Although such guns are not currently on the market, experts estimate they could be developed shortly, but the ability to detect such a device is years away. The bill covers any firearm that cannot be detected by a walk-through metal detector, but it exempts any gun that has been certified by the Pentagon or the Central Intelligence Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1988
The sale, manufacture and distribution of plastic foam products, such as insulated coffee cups, made with harmful chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) will be banned in Los Angeles starting next July 1, the City Council decided Tuesday. Without debate, the council approved a proposed ordinance sponsored by Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky last November. But the ban will not remove plastic foam products from use.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
The House, moving to control the threat of terrorist weapons that have yet to be developed, gave final approval Thursday to legislation controlling the manufacture, sale and use of all-plastic weapons that could elude metal detectors in airports and public buildings. The bill, which was approved on a voice vote, was passed earlier by the Senate. It now goes to President Reagan, who is expected to sign it into law.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | United Press International
The Justice Department, ending a long silence by the Reagan Administration on the issue, endorsed legislation Wednesday to ban plastic guns unless they contain enough metal to set off metal detectors. After months of internal debate in the Administration, Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III promised Sen. James A. McClure (R-Ida.), "the enthusiastic support of the Justice Department" for his legislation on undetectable plastic guns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An experiment with plastic bricks by an Encino church may give Caltrans the ability to build lighter, cheaper sound walls to contain the noise of freeway traffic. Bethel Lutheran Church is building a 13-foot-high wall of polyurethane bricks between the Ventura Freeway and the church and its school, the first use of the lightweight blocks for a sound wall in the United States, according to the state Department of Transportation and the manufacturer of the blocks.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1988 | MARTHA M. HAMILTON, Washington Post
The sturdy brown paper grocery bag was a fixture. A verity. An expense. So when the crinkly plastic grocery bag made its U.S. debut, promising grocers big savings, it rapidly took over a large share of the market. Virtually unknown a decade ago, the petrochemical grocery bag now accounts for between 35% and 50% of the 30 billion bags sold annually, up from 5% as recently as 1982.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2007 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
This environmentally friendly city put a green spin Tuesday on the checkout question "Paper or plastic?," becoming the first in the nation to outlaw non-recyclable plastic bags from use in supermarkets, drugstores and other large retailers. By a 10-1 vote, the Board of Supervisors required the use of compostable or recyclable bags -- a move officials predicted could soon be imitated by other cities nationwide. One supervisor voted against the ban, saying the issue needed more study.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1988 | United Press International
Japanese industrial machinery manufacturers Monday denied a claim by the American plastics industry that rising imports of injection molding machines are threatening the United States' national security. The denial followed the Jan. 11 filing of a petition against Japanese and European manufacturers by the Society of the Plastics Industry under section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962.
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