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OPINION
June 22, 2013
Any regular reader of The Times' opinion pages knows that our letter writers tend to be an environmentally conscious bunch (several include as a postscript to their e-mailed messages, "Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail"). So ever since other cities started passing bans on plastic grocery bags and Los Angeles officials began weighing such a law, most letters have supported doing away with this environmental menace. But something changed after the City Council on Tuesday tentatively approved a ban, which will make L.A. by far the largest city in the U.S. to go without plastic bags.
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OPINION
June 20, 2013
Re "L.A. approves plastic bag ban," June 19 While plastic carryout and grocery bags are a problem, banning their use is a draconian way to solve the problem. As an environmentalist for 70 years, I have learned that it is better to be a good cop and use a carrot to solve environmental problems rather than be a bully and use a big stick as City Hall is doing, primarily because it gives people incentives to protect the environment. A better way would be to charge a five-cent recycling fee on every plastic bag and require recycling centers to pay five cents for every bag returned.
OPINION
June 19, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Now that the Los Angeles City Council has tentatively approved a ban on plastic carry-out bags, I'd like to report to you that it'll be easy to live without them. I'd like to say that after a similar ban took effect in my city this year, I had no problem getting my groceries to the car, no problem lining my garbage cans and no moments of annoyance. Truth is, though, it can be a pain. Sometimes, you just crave a flimsy wisp of plastic with built-in handles to carry out the trash, or to hold some messy item that should not see the inside of a backpack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Catherine Saillant and Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
Attention Los Angeles shoppers: The plastic bag is disappearing from more than just the supermarket. L.A. on Tuesday became the newest and by far the largest city to back a ban on plastic grocery bags, approving an ordinance that applies not just to food stores and mini marts but also big retail chains with their own line of groceries, such as Target and Wal-Mart. The ordinance, which has been in the works for years, would go into effect gradually, reaching large stores Jan. 1 and smaller ones July 1, 2014.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By David Zahniser and Catherine Saillant
Los Angeles on Tuesday became the largest city in the nation to move toward a ban on plastic grocery bags, with the City Council barring them in supermarkets, convenience stores and any big retailer that sells groceries. Nearly three weeks after a similar measure was defeated in the California Legislature, the City Council voted 11-1 to prohibit the so-called "single use" plastic bags in pharmacies, food markets and any large store -- including Target and Wal-Mart -- that has a grocery section.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Nearly three weeks after a statewide ban on plastic bags was rejected in Sacramento, the Los Angeles City Council is moving ahead with a similar measure to regulate carryout bags at supermarkets, pharmacies and some big retail chains. Council members are scheduled to vote Tuesday on the final draft of its grocery bag ordinance, which would impose fines of up to $500 for those who repeatedly distribute "single-use" plastic bags to customers. The proposed law, in the works for years, would apply to convenience stores, food marts and any large retailer that sells groceries, such as Target and Wal-Mart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Catherine Saillant and Matt Stevens
Attention Los Angeles shoppers: The plastic bag is disappearing from more than just the supermarket. L.A. on Tuesday became the newest and by far the largest city to back a ban on plastic grocery bags, approving an ordinance that applies not just to food stores and mini-marts but also big retail chains with their own groceries, such as Target and Wal-Mart. The ordinance, which has been in the works for years, will go into effect gradually, reaching large stores Jan. 1 and smaller ones July 1, 2014.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein
A jury has acquitted on all counts a Sherman Oaks plastic surgeon who city prosecutors alleged had clandestinely videotaped female patients after they had undressed for medical examinations, officials said Monday. Dr. Lance Everett Wyatt, who specializes in plastic and reconstructive surgery, faced six misdemeanor counts related to what the city attorney's office characterized as illegal video recordings and "sexual battery and battery. " But attorney Kevin McKesson, working with investigator Scott Ross, said his client was the victim of a misunderstanding compounded by an incomplete investigation by Los Angeles Police Department detectives and investigators with the state medical board.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Think Latino Democratic lawmakers from Los Angeles vote the same way on key bills? Think again. Case in point: the recent defeat of a plastic shopping bag ban. The bill, by Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima), died after fellow Latinos voted it down on the Senate floor. SB 405 would have prohibited supermarkets and superstores from handing out plastic bags after Jan. 1. Convenience stores and smaller outlets had a later deadline. Padilla said that the bags cause litter, foul up sorting machines and harm wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
This being California, Hollywood celebrities sometimes jump into battles over state legislation in Sacramento. Last week, a group of singers and actors went up against the plastics industry over a bill that would have banned single-use plastic grocery bags from California stores. “I've been bombarded by phone calls by folks who live in Malibu and stars who live in Hollywood," Sen. Kevin de Leon (D-Los Angeles) told colleagues during the floor debate. An aide to the senator said he was contacted in support of the bill by entertainers including singers Bonnie Raitt, Bette Midler and Jackson Browne, and actress Rita Wilson, the wife of Tom Hanks.
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