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Plateau

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2002
The city is planning two public meetings to discuss its plans to preserve 190 acres known as the Western Plateau. The meetings will be Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Goebel Senior Center, 1385 E. Janss Road, and Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Newbury Park Library, 2331 Borchard Road. City staff members will explain the plan to permanently protect the environmentally sensitive plateau by transferring development rights to other areas of the city. For more information, call 449-2115.
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NEWS
December 29, 2001 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dreary wait for the latest news about Osama bin Laden is starting to feel almost normal--at least to anyone tuning in to the 24-hour television news channels. MSNBC's news crawl late Thursday night highlighted a story out of Gainesville, Fla., where police had followed a trail of Skittles wrappers to three boys suspected of stealing candy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The City Council is pushing to get $7.5 million for affordable housing from developers in an agreement involving the environmentally sensitive Western Plateau. Council members unanimously supported Councilman Ed Masry's plan to ask developers to change certain terms of the complex land deal, which is still being negotiated. Currently, developers could be required to build 50 affordable housing units as part of a plan not to develop the plateau.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite signs of a flagging economy, the budgetary house remained in order at the Orange County Performing Arts Center during the just concluded 2000-01 season. Center officials reported Thursday that annual spending topped $30 million for the first time at the county's biggest arts organization. The center finished with a slight surplus while presenting a record 339 performances. But there are signs that economic slowing is beginning to have an impact.
SPORTS
June 6, 2001 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Angels fastened their crampons, swung their pick axes into the side of the mountain and ascended to what seemed like unfathomable heights, reaching the .500 mark with Tuesday night's 7-3 pasting of the Oakland Athletics before 16,166 in Edison Field. Now what? It has been so long since the Angels (28-28) had as many wins as losses--April 15, when they were 6-6, to be exact--and they have spent so much energy trying to reach that elusive .
BUSINESS
May 21, 2001 | From Associated Press
Gasoline prices nationwide leveled off during the two weeks ending May 18, apparently ending a series of increases that sent prices up 29 cents a gallon over a two-month period, an analyst said Sunday. The average price of gas, including all grades and taxes, rose only about three-quarters of a cent from May 4 to 18, to $1.76 a gallon, according to the Lundberg Survey of 8,000 stations nationwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2001
The deal to swap land between the Conejo Recreation and Park District and the Conejo Valley Unified School District was never part of any plan for the Dos Vientos development. This swap came about as a solution to provide a middle school site within the confines of Dos Vientos as a result of recent concerns about middle school overcrowding in the two years since sixth-graders have started attending middle rather than elementary schools. The swap does not diminish any parkland in Dos Vientos; it only increases land that can be used for the middle school site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2001 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A complex plan to swap development rights, which divided the City Council and pitted residents against one another, was approved Tuesday after more than five hours of sometimes acrimonious debate. Shortly before midnight, the council voted 3 to 2, with members Linda Parks and Ed Masry dissenting, to sign agreements designed to save the Western Plateau, 180 acres of environmentally sensitive land otherwise approved for a development of 147 million-dollar homes.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with $1 million in federal research money, a group of UC Riverside scientists will begin this month to tackle a curious but bedeviling problem for national monuments, parks and wilderness areas across the West: smog. Seen as an urban problem, pockets of smog and haze also plague remote, otherwise scenic spots that are protected by the federal government, from Joshua Tree National Park and the Grand Canyon to Yosemite's stark and breathtaking Half Dome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2000
Re "Council Approves Land Swap Deal to Save Open Space," Oct. 26. The Thousand Oaks City Council's conceptual approval of a deal with developers allowing more development in Dos Vientos Ranch was unnecessary to save the western plateau. The council has options for saving the plateau from proposed development without this complex deal that creates a boon for developers. Unfortunately, there are many losers as a result of this deal. Dos Vientos Ranch homeowners get more development and higher density population than they bargained for. Seniors lost the affordable housing that was scrapped in order to give Shappell Industries a place to build.
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