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Plates

HOME & GARDEN
September 12, 2009 | Debra Prinzing
Satisfy your inner architect and set the dinner table with these platters, plates, mugs and linens embellished in blueprint-style patterns. The Floorplan collection's black-line drawings depict just about every type of urban abode available, from the post-college studio to the uptown penthouse. "Customers are putting them all together and having fun with them," says Sara Mills, who worked on the design team with Julie Gaines, owner of the Fishs Eddy housewares outlet in Manhattan. The stackable pieces are made of sturdy china and are safe to use in the microwave and dishwasher.
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BOOKS
September 21, 1986 | Jack Miles
Disegno in Italian means "drawing," but an English speaker would not be entirely misled by the similarity of the word to the English design ; for, as Nicholas Turner explains in his introduction to this collection of drawings from the British Museum, disegno was for the Florentines "the animating force uniting the different arts."
BUSINESS
April 19, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Honk if you love farmers. The California Department of Food and Agriculture is trying to rally public support for special license plates that tout a driver's support for the state's agricultural industry and would charge a premium fee for them. The bulk of those fees, which would be tacked onto a person's normal vehicle registration costs, would pay for statewide education and training programs aimed at secondary school kids interested in farm careers. The fees for plates with numbers randomly selected by the state Department of Motor Vehicles would cost $50 for the first year and $40 a year to renew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2013 | By Thomas Curwen, Los Angeles Times
Anton Orlov held one of the glass plates to the light. The hand-colored image seemed to glow. Two soldiers in long brown coats, rifles over their shoulders, stood with their backs to the camera. A trolley rushed out of the frame. A small patch of sky held a delicate blue wash, and red banners with yellow letters hung from the sides of a building. Orlov swore he recognized the building. It had granite garlands above the windows and carved figures supporting the corbels beneath the balcony.
OPINION
July 9, 2010
California legislators who have proposed selling digital ads on car license plates to help close the state budget gap vow that, if they ever go ahead with the plan, they will take steps to ensure the "integrity" of the venture. Unfortunately, that would be impossible. In order to ensure an idea's integrity, it has to have integrity in the first place. It's true that the economy is dog-paddling, the state budget deficit is at $19 billion and counting, and no one is eager to pay extra taxes.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
For more than 10 years, a sign atop Belisle's restaurant in Garden Grove has carried the assertion, "5 Out of 4 Eat Here." People who have never eaten there probably think the sign is a joke. But for the 33 years' worth of customers who have gorged themselves into shock at Belisle's, it's dead-on truth in advertising. Any four people sitting down to a full meal there had better have the appetite of at least one more person or they won't have a prayer of a chance of cleaning their plates.
FOOD
August 20, 2008 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Restaurant Critic
TWO "food dudes" -- laid-back, long-haired cooks who grew up in Florida and are culinary graduates of the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale -- make their way to California and end up at the late Chadwick in Beverly Hills working with Ben Ford and Govind Armstrong. In 2004, the dudes, Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo, found Carmelized Productions, a catering company. Soon, they're starring in the Food Network docudrama series, "Two Dudes Catering," which purports to show "two young renegade chefs who play by their own rules" in "the big time world of Hollywood catering."
HEALTH
April 11, 2011 | Roy M. Wallack, Wallack is the author of "Run for Life" and "Bike for Life."
Good grip is a good thing. In daily life, you need strong hands, wrists and forearms to hold grocery bags, staircase railings, steering wheels and plenty of other things we take for granted. In athletics, your grip is the last link between you and your sport -- whether it be gymnastics or tennis or rock climbing or ping-pong. New research even says your grip is an indicator of overall body strength -- and also maybe how long you'll live. Bottom line: It pays to keep your grip strong, especially if you play hard or are older than 50, when strength wanes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1987
I read Bell's column on reforming auto insurance. I agree with her no-fault and state-backed liability coverage proposals. I would recommend a third improvement on the California insurance system, wherein license plates would be issued only upon the driver's demonstrating proof of having insurance. The system works well in Massachusetts; all cars have license plates, and all plates have been issued only after the owner has gotten his application stamped by his insurance carrier.
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