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Plates

HOME & GARDEN
September 12, 2009 | Debra Prinzing
Satisfy your inner architect and set the dinner table with these platters, plates, mugs and linens embellished in blueprint-style patterns. The Floorplan collection's black-line drawings depict just about every type of urban abode available, from the post-college studio to the uptown penthouse. "Customers are putting them all together and having fun with them," says Sara Mills, who worked on the design team with Julie Gaines, owner of the Fishs Eddy housewares outlet in Manhattan. The stackable pieces are made of sturdy china and are safe to use in the microwave and dishwasher.
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BOOKS
September 21, 1986 | Jack Miles
Disegno in Italian means "drawing," but an English speaker would not be entirely misled by the similarity of the word to the English design ; for, as Nicholas Turner explains in his introduction to this collection of drawings from the British Museum, disegno was for the Florentines "the animating force uniting the different arts."
BUSINESS
April 19, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Honk if you love farmers. The California Department of Food and Agriculture is trying to rally public support for special license plates that tout a driver's support for the state's agricultural industry and would charge a premium fee for them. The bulk of those fees, which would be tacked onto a person's normal vehicle registration costs, would pay for statewide education and training programs aimed at secondary school kids interested in farm careers. The fees for plates with numbers randomly selected by the state Department of Motor Vehicles would cost $50 for the first year and $40 a year to renew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2013 | By Thomas Curwen, Los Angeles Times
Anton Orlov held one of the glass plates to the light. The hand-colored image seemed to glow. Two soldiers in long brown coats, rifles over their shoulders, stood with their backs to the camera. A trolley rushed out of the frame. A small patch of sky held a delicate blue wash, and red banners with yellow letters hung from the sides of a building. Orlov swore he recognized the building. It had granite garlands above the windows and carved figures supporting the corbels beneath the balcony.
OPINION
July 9, 2010
California legislators who have proposed selling digital ads on car license plates to help close the state budget gap vow that, if they ever go ahead with the plan, they will take steps to ensure the "integrity" of the venture. Unfortunately, that would be impossible. In order to ensure an idea's integrity, it has to have integrity in the first place. It's true that the economy is dog-paddling, the state budget deficit is at $19 billion and counting, and no one is eager to pay extra taxes.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
You can have your "A Visit from St. Nicholas" and "A Christmas Carol. " My favorite holiday reading is always the list of new state laws. Nearly 750 new ones for 2013 were passed by the Legislature and signed by the governor last year. With the Legislature in session about seven months, that's something like 100 a month. But it can hardly be said that every one was accompanied by stirring, democracy-defining debates. My favorite so far is the slam-dunk law ending the discounts for past and current state legislators and California members of Congress who order vanity plates for their cars.
SCIENCE
March 23, 2010 | By Melissa Healy
The Christian faith holds several acts of "super-sizing" to be miracles accomplished by Jesus Christ -- a handful of fish and loaves of bread expanded to feed thousands; a wedding feast running low on wine suddenly awash in the stuff. Now a new study of portion expansion puts Jesus once more at the center. In a bid to uncover the roots of super-sized American fare, a pair of sibling scholars has turned to an unusual source: 52 artists' renderings of the New Testament's Last Supper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Tighter gun controls, new rights for immigrants and a measure increasing access to abortion are among many hundreds of California laws that take effect with the new year. Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature also restricted the controversial oil-drilling technique known as fracking and allowed transgender students to choose which school restrooms to use and sports teams to join, based on their gender identity. California's willingness to address contentious policy issues, many of which have remained suspended in Washington's partisan divide, comes in the state's new era of one-party rule.
FOOD
August 20, 2008 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Restaurant Critic
TWO "food dudes" -- laid-back, long-haired cooks who grew up in Florida and are culinary graduates of the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale -- make their way to California and end up at the late Chadwick in Beverly Hills working with Ben Ford and Govind Armstrong. In 2004, the dudes, Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo, found Carmelized Productions, a catering company. Soon, they're starring in the Food Network docudrama series, "Two Dudes Catering," which purports to show "two young renegade chefs who play by their own rules" in "the big time world of Hollywood catering."
SCIENCE
November 26, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Ants may seem tiny and weak when they're alone, but together they can form a sort of "super-organism" -- one with superpowers. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found that a jumbled crowd of fire ants acts like both an elastic solid and a viscous liquid -- a rare and remarkable property that holds the secrets of self-healing materials. The discovery could one day help scientists design self-repairing bridges and self-assembling modular robots, said co-author David Hu, a mechanical engineer at Georgia Tech, at the American Physical Society's fluid dynamics conference in Pittsburgh.
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