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Plates

HOME & GARDEN
September 12, 2009 | Debra Prinzing
Satisfy your inner architect and set the dinner table with these platters, plates, mugs and linens embellished in blueprint-style patterns. The Floorplan collection's black-line drawings depict just about every type of urban abode available, from the post-college studio to the uptown penthouse. "Customers are putting them all together and having fun with them," says Sara Mills, who worked on the design team with Julie Gaines, owner of the Fishs Eddy housewares outlet in Manhattan. The stackable pieces are made of sturdy china and are safe to use in the microwave and dishwasher.
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BOOKS
September 21, 1986 | Jack Miles
Disegno in Italian means "drawing," but an English speaker would not be entirely misled by the similarity of the word to the English design ; for, as Nicholas Turner explains in his introduction to this collection of drawings from the British Museum, disegno was for the Florentines "the animating force uniting the different arts."
BUSINESS
April 19, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Honk if you love farmers. The California Department of Food and Agriculture is trying to rally public support for special license plates that tout a driver's support for the state's agricultural industry and would charge a premium fee for them. The bulk of those fees, which would be tacked onto a person's normal vehicle registration costs, would pay for statewide education and training programs aimed at secondary school kids interested in farm careers. The fees for plates with numbers randomly selected by the state Department of Motor Vehicles would cost $50 for the first year and $40 a year to renew.
OPINION
July 9, 2010
California legislators who have proposed selling digital ads on car license plates to help close the state budget gap vow that, if they ever go ahead with the plan, they will take steps to ensure the "integrity" of the venture. Unfortunately, that would be impossible. In order to ensure an idea's integrity, it has to have integrity in the first place. It's true that the economy is dog-paddling, the state budget deficit is at $19 billion and counting, and no one is eager to pay extra taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2013 | By Thomas Curwen, Los Angeles Times
Anton Orlov held one of the glass plates to the light. The hand-colored image seemed to glow. Two soldiers in long brown coats, rifles over their shoulders, stood with their backs to the camera. A trolley rushed out of the frame. A small patch of sky held a delicate blue wash, and red banners with yellow letters hung from the sides of a building. Orlov swore he recognized the building. It had granite garlands above the windows and carved figures supporting the corbels beneath the balcony.
SCIENCE
March 23, 2010 | By Melissa Healy
The Christian faith holds several acts of "super-sizing" to be miracles accomplished by Jesus Christ -- a handful of fish and loaves of bread expanded to feed thousands; a wedding feast running low on wine suddenly awash in the stuff. Now a new study of portion expansion puts Jesus once more at the center. In a bid to uncover the roots of super-sized American fare, a pair of sibling scholars has turned to an unusual source: 52 artists' renderings of the New Testament's Last Supper.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
For more than 10 years, a sign atop Belisle's restaurant in Garden Grove has carried the assertion, "5 Out of 4 Eat Here." People who have never eaten there probably think the sign is a joke. But for the 33 years' worth of customers who have gorged themselves into shock at Belisle's, it's dead-on truth in advertising. Any four people sitting down to a full meal there had better have the appetite of at least one more person or they won't have a prayer of a chance of cleaning their plates.
FOOD
October 21, 2010 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
It's a story so revolting and so legendary that it has achieved near mythical status. One night in the 1960s, during a particularly heavy bout of drinking, Jim Morrison stood up and urinated on the long wooden bar at Barney's Beanery in West Hollywood. Rock god status and titillating snug leather pants or not, Morrison was booted from the famous restaurant and bar. "Of course, this being Barney's, they wiped it off and put a plaque there," jokes Jim Ladd, the KLOS-FM DJ known for spinning raw, classic rock sans formulaic playlists for nearly 40 years.
HEALTH
April 11, 2011 | Roy M. Wallack, Wallack is the author of "Run for Life" and "Bike for Life."
Good grip is a good thing. In daily life, you need strong hands, wrists and forearms to hold grocery bags, staircase railings, steering wheels and plenty of other things we take for granted. In athletics, your grip is the last link between you and your sport -- whether it be gymnastics or tennis or rock climbing or ping-pong. New research even says your grip is an indicator of overall body strength -- and also maybe how long you'll live. Bottom line: It pays to keep your grip strong, especially if you play hard or are older than 50, when strength wanes.
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