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October 4, 1992 | LINDA FELDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gertrude Finkelstein wasn't really looking for new things to do when she retired from her obstetrics-gynecology practice. She didn't want to be tied down to anything. Then she received a recruitment letter inviting her to join UCLA Extension's Perpetual Learning and Teaching Organization--the Plato Society. It was an offer that someone with a lifelong love of learning could not refuse. The society was founded in 1980 and has grown to a membership of 303.
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NEWS
October 4, 1992 | LINDA FELDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gertrude Finkelstein wasn't really looking for new things to do when she retired from her obstetrics-gynecology practice. She didn't want to be tied down to anything. Then she received a recruitment letter inviting her to join UCLA Extension's Perpetual Learning and Teaching Organization--the Plato Society. It was an offer that someone with a lifelong love of learning could not refuse. The society was founded in 1980 and has grown to a membership of 303.
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NEWS
October 21, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francis Meyers, retired businessman and active musician, believes that people die fromthe top down. Let the mind rot and the body goes to pot; keep the brain clicking and theheart will go on ticking. And by his calculations, the shortest distance between retirement and the cemetery runsstraight through Las Vegas. Meyers made his discovery not long after he sold his jewelry-manufacturing business and began making the rounds of retirement clubs.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francis Meyers, retired businessman and active musician, believes that people die fromthe top down. Let the mind rot and the body goes to pot; keep the brain clicking and theheart will go on ticking. And by his calculations, the shortest distance between retirement and the cemetery runsstraight through Las Vegas. Meyers made his discovery not long after he sold his jewelry-manufacturing business and began making the rounds of retirement clubs.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | KATHY SEAL, Seal lives in Santa Monica
Three things are forbidden at UCLA Extension's Plato Society: organ concerts, discussing grandchildren and comparing aches and pains. But most other topics fall within the realm of the Perpetual Learning and Teaching Organization, where 275 retired and semi-retired business, professional and creative people study for the pure pleasure of it. Society members range in age from their 50s to their early 90s.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francis A. Meyers, who encouraged continuing education for senior citizens, and his wife, Eleanor, have died in an automobile crash. He was 82 and she was 78. The fatal accident occurred Sunday when the automobile of an alleged drunk driver pushed their car over the center divider of the Riverside Freeway. The couple, who had been married for 56 years, were driving home to Silver Lake from a conference of the Assn. for Learning in Retirement Organizations, where Francis Meyers had spoken.
NEWS
February 24, 2000
Gerald S. Graber, 71, a British-born historian whose subjects ranged from Nazi Germany to the Armenian genocide. Born in London, Graber earned a master's degree in political science/philosophy/economics at the London School of Economics and took postgraduate studies in philosophy under Karl Jaspers at Basel University in Switzerland. After moving to Southern California 20 years ago, he taught through UCLA Extension and was affiliated with the PLATO Society of UCLA.
NEWS
July 23, 1992
Elizabeth Lawrence Cless, a heralded educator who spent most of her career helping adults renew their lives, died Monday in Cambridge, Mass., at the age of 76. A family spokesman said she had suffered from cancer. Mrs. Cless, a 1938 Radcliffe graduate who worked for the U.S. State Department and as a fashion director before devoting herself to education, established the first continuing education program for older women at the University of Minnesota in 1958.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Margy Newman, who formed and guided the Westwood Playhouse into the significant theatrical showcase it has become, died over the weekend of cancer. Her husband, Arnold, said she was 68 and died Saturday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Mrs. Newman, with producer Leonard Blair, (and later on her own) took over the 500-seat theater in what once was the Masonic Club of UCLA on Le Conte Avenue in 1974.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | MARY GUTHRIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ethel Allen doesn't want any part of the bingo games and sing-alongs that stereotype many people's retirements. She'd rather study Islamic culture or the science of chaos. "They have senior citizens centers where they treat you like a baby and talk to you like you are 3 years old--so you begin to think that you are," the 68-year-old Palos Verdes resident says.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | KATHY SEAL, Seal lives in Santa Monica
Three things are forbidden at UCLA Extension's Plato Society: organ concerts, discussing grandchildren and comparing aches and pains. But most other topics fall within the realm of the Perpetual Learning and Teaching Organization, where 275 retired and semi-retired business, professional and creative people study for the pure pleasure of it. Society members range in age from their 50s to their early 90s.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | DAVID LUSTIG, Lustig is a regular contributor to Valley View.
Retired six years, Art Frumkin of Van Nuys hadn't had time to watch much television or play shuffleboard. Frumkin, 67, a former trucking company sales manager, was busy studying for his reports on the lives of conductor Arturo Toscanini and cellist Pablo Casals. A later one was scheduled to be about the religious cults of Melanesia. "To let my brain atrophy and watch the grass grow just isn't for me," he said. "I want to continue to learn. And I'm having a hell of a lot of fun doing so."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1988 | PERRY C. RIDDLE
Morris Cutler, 63, had a career as a primary education teacher and administrator. Then an overseas break from his local duties changed his life. Cutler and his wife, Faye, live in Northridge. When I was 50, I took a job overseas with the Agency for International Development, our State Department thing through Teacher's College, Columbia, and I went to Afghanistan. We got to Afghanistan three years prior to the Russians' coming in.
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