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Playmates Toys Company

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BUSINESS
September 7, 2008 | Tiffany Hsu, Times Staff Writer
The gig: President since 2001 of Playmates Toys Inc., whose 55 U.S. employees design and market toys manufactured by the Playmates Toys Ltd. branch in Hong Kong. The company went public in February after splitting from its 42-year-old parent, Playmates Holdings Ltd. of Hong Kong. Famous for producing toys based on the Disney princesses and on "The Land Before Time" and "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" franchises, the company is working on products to coincide with the summer 2009 release of the latest "Terminator" and "Star Trek" films.
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BUSINESS
September 7, 2008 | Tiffany Hsu, Times Staff Writer
The gig: President since 2001 of Playmates Toys Inc., whose 55 U.S. employees design and market toys manufactured by the Playmates Toys Ltd. branch in Hong Kong. The company went public in February after splitting from its 42-year-old parent, Playmates Holdings Ltd. of Hong Kong. Famous for producing toys based on the Disney princesses and on "The Land Before Time" and "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" franchises, the company is working on products to coincide with the summer 2009 release of the latest "Terminator" and "Star Trek" films.
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BUSINESS
June 10, 1997
Playmates Toys in Costa Mesa is hoping to share in the virtual craze for virtual pets that's swept Japan in recent months. The toy company's Nano line of toys--in reality, a character on an LCD display--is aimed at young girls. For between $14.99 and $19.99, Nano owners get the virtual thrill of "raising" a virtual baby, kitten or puppy. Treat the youngster right and it grows up--but fail to feed it and it will run away.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1997
Playmates Toys in Costa Mesa is hoping to share in the virtual craze for virtual pets that's swept Japan in recent months. The toy company's Nano line of toys--in reality, a character on an LCD display--is aimed at young girls. For between $14.99 and $19.99, Nano owners get the virtual thrill of "raising" a virtual baby, kitten or puppy. Treat the youngster right and it grows up--but fail to feed it and it will run away.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1996 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marketing a successful board game that features "Space Jam" stars Michael Jordan and Bugs Bunny would seem to be child's play. Yet, even with an assist from Warner Bros.' heavily promoted movie, the new board game from Playmates Toys Inc.--its first venture into the $374-million board game niche--is far from a slam-dunk. The Costa Mesa-based company faces cutthroat competition at every turn from market giants like Parker Bros. and Milton Bradley.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After what must seem like an eternity to weary parents and sales-starved makers of rival toys, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle mania is cooling. Sales of that gang of four pizza-chomping sewer dwellers--a whopping total of about $1.1 billion at retail over the past four years--dropped by about one-third this year, and analysts expect sales to taper off even more in 1992.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1996 | GREG JOHNSON
Playmates Toys Inc., which helped popularize the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles in the 1980s, is moving its corporate headquarters from La Mirada to Costa Mesa, the company said Monday. Playmates Toys and Playmates Interactive Entertainment Inc., a sister company that makes video games, have signed a seven-year lease for 27,000 square feet of space in the Comerica Bank Tower Building on Anton Boulevard. About 50 employees are making the move.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1996
Playmates Toys Inc. anticipates that its $50-million retail shipment of "Space Jam" action figures will sell out by month's end. The action figures are riding on the considerable coattails of the movie's stars, including basketball hero Michael Jordan and Looney Tunes characters like Bugs Bunny, Elmer Fudd and Sylvester. The Costa Mesa-based company will ship a new generation of "Space Jam" toys to retail shelves in 1997.
NEWS
August 17, 1999 | DON OLDENBURG, WASHINGTON POST
Dan Lauer is big on toys. Not just any toys, but creative toys, offbeat toys, playthings that are so significant to a child's life that decades from now, when today's children look back, they will remember them as their all-time favorites. Toys that mattered. Why should you care? Because Lauer isn't just playing around anymore; he means business. And guess who he wants for his business partner: could be you.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1996
Playmates Toys Inc. anticipates that its $50-million retail shipment of "Space Jam" action figures will sell out by month's end. The action figures are riding on the considerable coattails of the movie's stars, including basketball hero Michael Jordan and Looney Tunes characters like Bugs Bunny, Elmer Fudd and Sylvester. The Costa Mesa-based company will ship a new generation of "Space Jam" toys to retail shelves in 1997.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1996 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marketing a successful board game that features "Space Jam" stars Michael Jordan and Bugs Bunny would seem to be child's play. Yet, even with an assist from Warner Bros.' heavily promoted movie, the new board game from Playmates Toys Inc.--its first venture into the $374-million board game niche--is far from a slam-dunk. The Costa Mesa-based company faces cutthroat competition at every turn from market giants like Parker Bros. and Milton Bradley.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1996 | GREG JOHNSON
Playmates Toys Inc., which helped popularize the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles in the 1980s, is moving its corporate headquarters from La Mirada to Costa Mesa, the company said Monday. Playmates Toys and Playmates Interactive Entertainment Inc., a sister company that makes video games, have signed a seven-year lease for 27,000 square feet of space in the Comerica Bank Tower Building on Anton Boulevard. About 50 employees are making the move.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After what must seem like an eternity to weary parents and sales-starved makers of rival toys, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle mania is cooling. Sales of that gang of four pizza-chomping sewer dwellers--a whopping total of about $1.1 billion at retail over the past four years--dropped by about one-third this year, and analysts expect sales to taper off even more in 1992.
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