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Plea Bargaining

BUSINESS
December 30, 2005 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
In a rare split, the Securities and Exchange Commission is at odds with its partner in cleaning up corporate accounting -- the Justice Department -- over a plea agreement with the former chief of Gemstar-TV Guide International Inc. The SEC's criticism of Henry Yuen's sentence as too lenient played a role in U.S. District Judge John Walters' decision last week to tentatively reject a deal between Yuen and the Justice Department.
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BUSINESS
December 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
Enron's former chief accounting officer, Richard A. Causey, has struck a plea bargain with federal prosecutors and will avoid going to trial with the fallen energy company's two top executives, according to a person familiar with the negotiations. Causey was expected to plead guilty today to one or more of the 34 criminal charges pending against him, this person told Associated Press on Tuesday on condition of anonymity because of the private nature of the discussions.
NATIONAL
December 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Lawyers for Republican lobbyist Jack Abramoff are in discussions with the Justice Department about his possible cooperation in a congressional corruption probe, a person involved in the investigation said. The probe involves a number of members of Congress as well as staff. A former aide to ex-House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) has already pleaded guilty.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2005 | Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writer
Before indicting Rep. Tom DeLay (R-Texas) on felony conspiracy and money-laundering charges, a Texas prosecutor offered him a chance to plead guilty to a misdemeanor that would have let DeLay keep his job as House majority leader, the congressman's lawyer said Monday. DeLay's lawyer, Dick DeGuerin, told Travis County Dist. Atty. Ronald D.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
Groping charges against Christian Slater will be dropped if the actor stays out of trouble for the next six months, under a plea agreement reached with prosecutors. "The case is dismissed, and we are very pleased with the outcome," his lawyer, Eric Franz, said Monday outside Manhattan Criminal Court. In July, the actor had rejected a plea bargain that would have required him to perform three days of community service in exchange for pleading guilty to second-degree harassment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2005 | Maria L. La Ganga and Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writers
An Islamic religious leader and his son, who were arrested during the investigation of possible terrorist activity in Lodi, Calif., agreed Friday to be deported in exchange for the government dropping charges that the two men misrepresented themselves when entering the country. Imam Mohammad Adil Khan, 47, and his son Mohammad Hassan Adil, 19, conceded in federal Immigration Court that they overstayed their religious worker visas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2005 | Bob Anez, Associated Press
Prosecutors on Monday reached a plea deal with the man accused of plotting to abduct David Letterman's young son, allowing him to plead guilty to lesser charges and dropping a kidnapping-related charge in return. Kelly Frank pleaded guilty in state District Court to felony theft, misdemeanor obstruction and possessing illegally killed wildlife, a felony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2005 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
In a rare criminal prosecution concerning the environment, a Texas-based energy company that owns much of California's pipelines pleaded guilty Tuesday to charges relating to a rupture that dumped 103,000 gallons of diesel fuel into a Bay Area marsh last year. The company, Kinder Morgan Energy Partners, also announced that it had agreed in principle to settle similar misdemeanor charges in Los Angeles County over a five-gallon spill at its terminal in Los Angeles Harbor in May 2004.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2005 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
With his trial underway, Eric Robert Rudolph agreed to plead guilty to a series of bombings that advanced a militant antigay, antiabortion ideology -- including a deadly explosion at the 1996 Summer Olympics here. The plea agreement, which the U.S. Department of Justice announced Friday, calls for Rudolph to serve a life sentence without parole and allows him to escape the death penalty.
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