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Pleasure

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TRAVEL
January 6, 1985
I wish to tell you of the pleasure we experienced during our recent stay at the Petite Auberge in San Francisco. One year ago we spent our first two-night sty there, and because of the friendly atmosphere of the staff and the guests we wanted to repeat the experience. In fact, we are already thinking of our next visit in December, 1985. BURT WOLLIN Tomball, Tex
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Nicole Teeny's first feature-length documentary unveils a little-known subculture, one that combines the Good Book with good old-fashioned competitiveness. But the National Bible Quiz Championship, with its teams of Scripture-spouting teens, isn't the main event in "Bible Quiz. " A smart, funny and disarming 17-year-old girl is the heart of this low-key charmer of a coming-of-age story. The intimate film, a prize winner at the Slamdance Film Festival, revolves around the experience of Mikayla Irle, a tomboyish 12th-grader with family troubles who finds a sense of belonging on a Bible Quiz team in Tacoma, Wash.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Nicole Teeny's first feature-length documentary unveils a little-known subculture, one that combines the Good Book with good old-fashioned competitiveness. But the National Bible Quiz Championship, with its teams of Scripture-spouting teens, isn't the main event in "Bible Quiz. " A smart, funny and disarming 17-year-old girl is the heart of this low-key charmer of a coming-of-age story. The intimate film, a prize winner at the Slamdance Film Festival, revolves around the experience of Mikayla Irle, a tomboyish 12th-grader with family troubles who finds a sense of belonging on a Bible Quiz team in Tacoma, Wash.
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By Jeff Bauman
It is a weekend for working around the house. My fiancee, Erin, and I have the baby's room to paint and some IKEA furniture to assemble. I roll out of bed early - 10:30 - and get into my wheelchair. Erin is already making coffee in the kitchen. "I started the first wall," she says. "I love that gray. " Erin never bugs me about sleeping late. For a few months after I was injured in the Boston Marathon bombings, I often slept 15 hours a day. The doctors said my body needed to heal.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The good news: According to a new report from the National Endowment for the Arts, more than half of American adults read books for pleasure in 2012. The bad news is that the percentage of adults reading works of literature -- in the NEA's definition, novels, short stories, poetry or plays -- has declined since 2008, returning to 2002 lows. Fifty-seven percent of American adults read one or more books not required for work or school in 2012 -- that's 128 million readers. Some other interesting findings: More women (64%)
REAL ESTATE
May 19, 1991
After reading William Stiles' curmudgeonly letter on April 21 regarding the Home Depot's service, I recommend he shop at similar stores to fully appreciate what a pleasure it is to shop at the Home Depot. I shop at the one in Van Nuys. I find the staff friendly, courteous, helpful and knowledgeable. If it is not their department, or they don't know the answer, they'll find someone who knows, then help you load your car or truck if you need it. My only complaint is that there is not a Home Depot closer to Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Song of Lunch," which airs Sunday as part of PBS' "Masterpiece Contemporary" series, is something you don't see every day, not even in bardic old England, whence it comes, and where a 47-minute TV drama using a narrative poem for a screenplay would seem somewhat more likely than it would here. Christopher Reid is the poet whose 2009 book is the source of all the words spoken here, in order, nearly all of them by the wonderful Alan Rickman, and nearly all the rest of them by the equally wonderful Emma Thompson, two actors whose many other accomplishments may be obscured in far posterity by their having appeared in "Harry Potter" movies.
NEWS
March 3, 1990
Frequently I find (Joseph Bell's) columns to be the most satisfactory in our entire Orange County Times. Considering that I do check most of the editorial and opinion pieces quite carefully I intend this to be a sincere compliment to (Bell). (The Feb. 10) column on our soft-spoken congressman (Rep. Robert K. Dornan) brought me great pleasure. You have a talent for stating facts gently yet forcefully. The column after your visit to Jimmy Carter's church was another that remains in my memory as well as my collection.
NEWS
November 30, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
PART mad Stravinsky, part mad Purcell, part mad Handel, Gerald Barry's "The Triumph of Beauty and Deceit" is a zany, outlandish and, of course, thoroughly batty 55-minute Irish opera. It also was a triumph of Pleasure, Truth and Time (its other three characters) in its American premiere Tuesday night at the Walt Disney Concert Hall. "Beauty and Deceit" was presented in concert form by the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group in its Green Umbrella series.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2004 | Jane Ciabattari, Special to The Times
Neil LaBute is noted for his sardonic, sometimes shockingly frank films ("In the Company of Men," in which two guys torment a deaf woman; "Your Friends and Neighbors," which exposes the sex lives of three intermingled couples) and stage plays ("The Mercy Seat," in which a man who was supposed to be in the World Trade Center on Sept. 11 uses the attack as an excuse to linger with his mistress, and "Bash," three one-acts about ordinary people who happen to be killers).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Horton Foote's "The Trip to Bountiful" is a deceptively small story. An elderly woman named Carrie Watts, living a stifling and increasingly marginalized existence with her son and daughter-in-law, is determined to return to her tiny hometown in the South. And so one day she does, escaping the bonds of age and family to board a bus headed toward Bountiful, Texas. There are few roles available to women of a certain age, fewer still that allow such performers to wield the subtle but symphonic skills that can only be acquired through a lifetime of fine acting.
SCIENCE
March 6, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Everyone dislikes some kind of music, but are there people out there who don't respond to musical pathos? Apparently, yes, and they weren't lying when they said so, according to a study published online Thursday in Current Biology. A team of researchers from Spain and Canada was trying to develop an accurate questionnaire to gauge people's sense of reward from music when they found that roughly 5% of their study subjects reported getting no pleasure at all from music. So they followed up by testing 30 subjects, grouped by their relative affinity for music.
OPINION
February 16, 2014 | By Amy Goldman Koss
The 10th birthday of Facebook last week caused me to recall my miserable pre-Facebook existence, when methods of procrastination were sorely limited. As a stay-at-home writer, phone calls were unruly and hard to control. What if the other person wanted to tell a long story? What if she wanted me to really pay attention? I could have a bit of contact with the outside world by scanning the newspaper or listening to the radio. But for me the switch in media was too jarring and tended to trigger frantic snacking, which often led to napping.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
In the new Lifetime original movie "Lizzie Borden Took an Ax," the protagonist's name is uttered in full many times throughout the film's 87 minutes. She isn't called "Lizzie" or "Miss Borden" but "Lizzie Borden. " The notorious name strikes tactical blows on the viewer's psyche, conjuring bits of legend, myth and contested story lines about the accused murderess' storied life. The movie, which airs Jan. 25, stars Christina Ricci, last seen on TV in the short-lived ABC series "Pan Am," a 1960s period piece.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Amid this season's flurry of massive cookbooks from important chefs such as David Kinch (Manresa), Daniel Patterson (Coi), Daniel Boulud (Daniel) and more, comes this modest entry from former Chez Panisse chef David Tanis, “One Good Dish: The Pleasures of a Simple Meal” (Artisan, 2013, $25.95). I sat down with the book the other day and read his short, but sweet introduction. What he means by one good dish is "tasty, simple and real," i.e., something a home cook could make without devoting the entire weekend to one recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Marcia Adair, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"When I was in high school and first heard the piece I immediately fell in love with it. It was sexy, naughty and little dangerous. By the time I got to college, I had dismissed it as cheesy trash. Now that I am older, it's all of the above. " That's Grant Gershon, music director of the Los Angeles Master Chorale, summing up the paradox that is Carl Orff's "Carmina Burana. " The choir is performing the work for the 17th time in its 50-year history Saturday and Sunday at Walt Disney Concert Hall, along with the L.A. Children's Chorus and three soloists.
NEWS
April 22, 1990
Welcome back to Carol Burnett in "Carol & Company." She's always been my favorite comedienne and her new series is such a pleasure. Gertie Francis, Rosemead
REAL ESTATE
July 26, 1987
As public relations professionals specializing in the real estate and development industry, it was a pleasure to read a positive article on our often misunderstood vocation. DALE E. TURNER STEPHANIE TURNER Manhattan Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The good news: According to a new report from the National Endowment for the Arts, more than half of American adults read books for pleasure in 2012. The bad news is that the percentage of adults reading works of literature -- in the NEA's definition, novels, short stories, poetry or plays -- has declined since 2008, returning to 2002 lows. Fifty-seven percent of American adults read one or more books not required for work or school in 2012 -- that's 128 million readers. Some other interesting findings: More women (64%)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2013 | By August Brown
There's one second of sound on John Legend's new album, "Love in the Future," that sums up his current artistic mission. It's on the delicate, gloomy track "Asylum," and the sound is a snare drum. Or rather a blast of raw, percussive white noise that punctuates Legend's future-soul tale of a love "where we both go crazy. " "We were leaning toward progressive, cool samples with space and minimalism," Legend said. "How do you refresh a genre that's so traditional and classic?" Although Legend is an R&B artist indebted to Sam Cooke's pristine phrasing and white-shoe piano ballads, his "Love in the Future" sounds remarkably modern.
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