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WORLD
June 17, 2002 | MEGAN K. STACK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the spring winds, they are tangled together: The strains of the Jewish teenagers' Pink Floyd, floating over the chlorinated waters of the swimming pool. The Palestinian call to prayer. And the gunfire that rumbles between the two. This is where Israel meets the West Bank, one of many unlikely battle zones in a claustrophobic land that reinvents itself from one hill to the next. This peak is a cozy cluster of basketball hoops, red-tiled roofs and gaudy flower beds.
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WORLD
June 16, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
A firefight near a Jewish settlement in the northern Gaza Strip left two Israeli soldiers and a Palestinian gunman dead Saturday, the Israeli military said, hours after its troops rolled into the West Bank towns of Jenin and Tulkarm. Soldiers on patrol near the Jewish settlement of Dugit encountered armed Palestinians, the military announced. In addition to the three people killed, four soldiers were wounded.
WORLD
June 15, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
WASHINGTON -- President Bush is expected to call for an interim Palestinian state in a speech next week--possibly as early as Tuesday--after final deliberations this weekend on his vision for breaking the deadlock in the Middle East peace process, according to U.S. and Middle East officials.
WORLD
June 14, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Yasser Arafat convened his new, streamlined Cabinet at his headquarters here Thursday, three days after Israeli tanks blockaded the complex and caused a delay. Israel ended the blockade in Ramallah on Wednesday, and on Thursday five new ministers swore allegiance to the Palestinian Authority. The slimmer Cabinet--down to 21 ministers from 31--came after Israel, the U.S. and Europe demanded that the Palestinian Authority president reform his corruption-ridden administration.
WORLD
June 9, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON -- President Bush on Saturday rejected an appeal from Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to set a timetable of two to three years to create a Palestinian state and conclude the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. After talks Friday night and Saturday morning at Camp David, the two leaders were at odds over a goal shared by key Arab allies to set a target date for a final settlement.
WORLD
June 7, 2002 | MEGAN K. STACK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once the explosions fell silent and the Israeli tanks crunched out of his flattened compound Thursday morning, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat paced the rooms that remained. Pale dust coated his prayer rug and coverlet; the mirror over his dresser was splintered; a crack ran across a framed snapshot of his daughter. This broken island of rooms--two buildings precariously linked by a cracked walkway--is all that remains of Arafat's vast, walled headquarters compound here.
WORLD
June 4, 2002 | MEGAN K. STACK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Palestinian judges on Monday ordered the release of militant leader and suspected assassination mastermind Ahmed Saadat, stirring this region's rage just as CIA Director George J. Tenet arrived to discuss the troubled Palestinian security services. Chief of the radical Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, Saadat was suspected of overseeing the October shooting death of Israel's ultranationalist tourism minister, Rehavam Zeevi.
WORLD
June 1, 2002 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
JERUSALEM -- With Israeli troops back in the West Bank city of Nablus and security forces on high alert for more suicide attacks, neither Israelis nor Palestinians held out much hope Friday that the Bush administration's latest peacemaking effort will produce a breakthrough. Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon told U.S.
WORLD
May 28, 2002 | MARY CURTIUS and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Palestinian suicide bomber strolled through a shopping mall here Monday evening, paused to watch children play, then detonated his explosives outside an ice cream parlor crowded with families. Two Israelis--a toddler and her grandmother--were killed, and more than 20 adults and children were wounded, police said. The bombing came as the Israeli army pressed ahead with a campaign of near-daily incursions into Palestinian towns.
WORLD
May 21, 2002 | From Associated Press
After Arkady Wieselman narrowly escaped Israel's deadliest suicide bombing by walking out of a hotel dining room moments before a blast killed 29 people, he phoned his family to say his survival was a miracle. After Sunday's blast in the vegetable market in Wieselman's home city of Netanya, his family's phone was silent.
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