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OPINION
October 21, 2009
Today's topic: Where can you point to the Patriot Act's success in stopping terrorists? Wednesday through Friday, Jena Baker McNeill and Julian Sanchez discuss the Patriot Act, portions of which Congress is considering reauthorizing. Point: Jena Baker McNeill Three alleged terrorist plots have been foiled in recent weeks in three U.S. cities: Dallas, New York and Springfield, Ill. Officials say the cases involved men who, in separate plots, wanted to bomb a federal building, a subway and a skyscraper.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
We'll tell you right now, if you haven't caught up with "The Good Wife," especially the episode that aired Sunday night, then stop reading now. This post is all about the big plot twist from that episode. OK, now that the requisite disclaimer is out of the way, let's quote David Letterman to guest Josh Charles on Monday night's "Late Show": "What the hell happened?" As shellshocked "Good Wife" viewers, or anyone who's spent time on social media in the last 48 hours, knows, on Sunday night Charles' character was suddenly killed by a stray bullet fired in a courtroom.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1990
I was shocked to learn that the "Buena Park Community" is the only one of its kind in Orange County (June 5). Since February, my daughter and I have weeded, dug, planted and harvested two plots in the "Community Organic Garden" at Golden West College in Huntington Beach. The peas, broccoli, red and green cabbage, strawberries, lettuce, cucumbers, zucchini, onions, carrots, etc., are now so abundant that we are able to not only enjoy a very healthy and tasty diet ourselves but also share our harvests with our neighbors and friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The aim of the poet is to inform or delight, or to combine together … both pleasure and applicability to life. " These words of the Roman poet Horace remain encoded in our cultural DNA. Even after the artistic revolutions incited by the Romantics, the realists and the various rabble-rousing factions of the avant-garde, the expectation endures that art should instruct or entertain or, better still, do both at the same time. Horace hard-liners, a conservative crew who would rather be educated by artists than amused by them, would no doubt cast a disapproving eye on the Echo Theater Company's indecorous (though sensationally acted)
NATIONAL
April 16, 2012 | By David Horsey
SEATTLE -- This weekend, MSNBC's Rachel Maddow and I sat down in a couple of armchairs and talked about how America drifts to war. Maddow is on a frenetic cross-country tour to publicize "Drift," her new book that shot to the top of the New York Times bestseller list as soon as it was released. She flew in for a few hours in Seattle on Saturday, and I interviewed her in front of a standing-room-only crowd at Town Hall. In liberal Seattle, Maddow is a rock star, and she got a rock star's greeting when she walked onstage in her very casual clothes (including sneakers with Halloween-orange shoelaces)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989
As a longtime admirer of the lyrics and music of Stephen Sondheim, I was pleased to discover that he is now reaching a larger audience ("Sondheim Isn't Quite Out of the 'Woods,' " by Barbara Isenberg, Jan. 8). I do, however, have one reservation about Mr. Sondheim's work, which Isenberg touches on in her reference to the "minimal plots" of his more recent shows. In Craig Zadan's biography, the composer is quoted as saying: "Up until 'Company' I thought that musicals had to have very strong plots.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Two men who professed devotion to Al Qaeda -- one a convert to Islam, the other a Jordanian native -- were charged Thursday with plotting to blow up buildings in Illinois and Texas. In both cases, the men thought they were working with Al Qaeda operatives when they were really working with undercover federal agents. One man, according to authorities, planted what he thought was an explosive outside a Dallas skyscraper, while the other parked a van, supposedly armed with a bomb, outside a federal courthouse in Springfield, Ill. The devices were fakes.
WORLD
October 18, 2002 | By Bob Drogin and Josh Meyer, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
In a world of cloak and dagger, one of the CIA's most secret campaigns was called simply "the Plan. " For two years before the Sept. 11 attacks, it was the official operational strategy that the CIA, the FBI and other U.S. agencies jointly adopted for their clandestine -- and still largely unsuccessful -- campaign to capture terrorist Osama bin Laden and his chief aides. CIA Director George J. Tenet described "the Plan" publicly for the first time Thursday during hearings in which he battled with lawmakers over his agen- cy's effectiveness leading up to the Sept.
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | Associated Press
A federal jury on Friday found the national leader of the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club guilty of conspiracy to violate federal firearms and explosives laws in plots to kill members of a rival gang. National leader Ralph (Sonny) Barger Jr. was one of 10 Hells Angels from Alaska and California accused of plotting attacks in Louisville and elsewhere against members of the Outlaws. Barger and Michael Vincent O'Farrell, both of Oakland, were convicted in U.S.
NEWS
May 28, 1989 | From Reuters
One mystery about mystery writing is where the creators of Sherlock Holmes and Sam Spade get their plots. Sara Paretsky, author of five novels featuring the Chicago private investigator Vi Warshawski, including "Bloodshot," says she has no problem. She gets her plots from the Wall Street Journal and the Chicago Tribune. "What I'm on the lookout for always is political or financial or industrial fraud on a scope or scale that might lead one to commit murder in order to prohibit this fraud from coming to light," Paretsky said recently at the Mystery Writers of America annual convention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Richard Winton and Joseph Serna
A West Hollywood skin care expert who allegedly tried to hire a hit man to snuff out the competition pleaded not guilty in a Los Angeles County courtroom Wednesday. Dawn DaLuise, 55, who boasted a celebrity clientele including Nicki Minaj, Jennifer Aniston and Alicia Silverstone, is charged with one count of solicitation of murder and is being held in lieu of $1 million bail. The allegation has stunned neighbors and associates, who said they knew about the rivalry between DaLuise and esthetician Gabriel Suarez but never thought it would go so far. Suarez moved in a couple doors down from DaLuise's business last year and started offering facials and male body waxing; the competition created tension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
A San Joaquin County community college student arrested near the Canadian border for allegedly attempting to travel to Syria to fight with al Qaeda had boasted of a plot to bomb the subway in Los Angeles, according to a federal affidavit. Nicholas Teausant, 20, of Acampo, near Lodi, Calif., was arrested early Monday as the bus he was on neared the U.S.-Canadian border in Blaine, Wash. He was charged with one count of attempting to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Richard Winton and Marisa Gerber
With a clientele of Hollywood celebrities such as Nicki Minaj, Jennifer Aniston and Alicia Silverstone, Dawn DaLuise was well-known as a skin-care guru to the stars. The 55-year-old former model ran a West Hollywood “skin refinery” that used electrical muscle stimulation instead of the typical steam-and-cream facial. Vogue and InStyle magazines have featured her and she was the go-to beauty expert for national publications. So last year, when esthetician Gabriel Suarez moved in a couple doors down and started offering facials and male body waxing, the competition created tension.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
Like the put-upon pharmacist at its center, the neo-noirish suburban comedy "Better Living Through Chemistry," co-written and co-directed by Geoff Moore and David Posamentier, is a bit of a cheat - and goes soft in the clutch. Said druggist Doug Varney (Sam Rockwell) is the henpecked hubby of a scornful fitness nut (a misused Michelle Monaghan), with an angry 12-year-old son (Harrison Holzer) and a controlling father-in-law (Ken Howard). But Doug goes from doormat to Don Juan when new customer Elizabeth (Olivia Wilde)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
If the gay-themed "Tennessee Queer" came out 20 years ago - or was at least a more deftly made film - perhaps it wouldn't seem so desperately past its sell-by date. But this unevenly acted yuckfest, which is as unsubtle as its title, has all the pizazz of a bad sitcom episode. When Jason Potts (Christian Walker), a New York City librarian living in domestic bliss with his idyllic boyfriend (Jerre Dye), is summoned back to his native Smyth, Tenn., under false pretenses (long story)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Art thief-turned-daredevil rider Crunch (Kurt Russell) - fresh from prison, having been burned by his weaselly partner-in-crime half-brother Nicky (Matt Dillon) - wants nothing more to do with heists. Yeah, right. "The Art of the Steal" is another Last Big Job concoction, albeit one in which writer-director Jonathan Sobol doubles down against staleness by stuffing his cast with appealing character actors who know their way around a profane quip (Terence Stamp, Jay Baruchel, Chris Diamantopoulos, Kenneth Welsh, Jason Jones)
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | GERALD FARIS
Most of them do it for fun and exercise. Some make it a social thing, exchanging tips about growing vegetables while sharing sandwiches, soft drinks or beer under the shade of a tree. Some take the scientific approach, determining, for example, the best kind of manure for a particular crop and the temperature that starts tomatoes ripening. Others don't know a whole lot more than how to spread fertilizer and use a watering hose--and they really don't care.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | TOM WELLS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the buttery light of late afternoon, the Key West Cemetery is a pleasant or spooky place, depending on how you feel about cemeteries. There are the brilliant orange flowers of the poinciana trees, the sweet-smelling white flowers of frangipani trees and the green of tall, stately Washingtonia palms. But all is not well here. There is the story of a crazy old German who fancied himself a count and who dug up the body of the young woman he loved and kept it in his bed for seven years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Robert Abele
As disarmingly bracing at times as the stunning Alberta mountains behind its love-frazzled characters, the romantic comedy "The Right Kind of Wrong" works often in spite of its willful eccentricities. Failed novelist turned dishwasher Leo (Ryan Kwanten) is an unwitting poster boy for marital disappointment thanks to his ex-wife's popular blog and book, "Why You Suck. " In rebounding, Leo decides feisty tour guide Colette (Sara Canning) is the woman of his dreams, despite the fact that he meets her on her wedding day. What follows is what you'd expect: a hapless dreamer's grand gestures, flabbergasted hand-wringing by the newlywed - whose bohemian mother (Catherine O'Hara)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A skin care specialist with a Hollywood celebrity clientele has been arrested and charged in a plot to hire a hit man to kill off a competitor who moved into her territory, authorities said. Dawn DaLuise, who owns Dawn DaLuise's Skin Refinery in West Hollywood, was arrested Wednesday and charged Friday with one count of solicitation of murder after detectives discovered an alleged plot to hire a man to kill her business rival, Gabriel Suarez, officials said. Records show Suarez operates Smooth Cheeks in the same block as DaLuise's business in the 8500 block of Santa Monica Boulevard.
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