Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPlumbing
IN THE NEWS

Plumbing

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Bill's daughter recently purchased a house, and it came with a home warranty. Then the trouble started. She took a shower and discovered that water was seeping out of the walls. Yow! Bill's daughter contacted the warranty provider and was told the policy didn't cover plumbing. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions Bill asks: Is that how these things usually work? And the answer is: No. Most home warranties cover plumbing, along with most other major systems and appliances.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Meehan Crist
The Royal Society for the Arts recently released a brilliant little animation based on a lecture by Dr. Brené Brown in which she differentiates between empathy and sympathy. In this animation, a sad fox is at the bottom of a deep, dark hole. An empathetic bear trundles down a rickety ladder into the hole, sits with the fox and says: "I know what it's like down here, and you're not alone. " A sympathetic gazelle peers down from the mouth of the hole, calling out: "Ooo! It's bad, uh-huh.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1997
Talk about cruel and unusual punishment. A plumbing problem at the state-of-the-art Twin Towers jail downtown left thousands of inmates with toilets that backed up and couldn't be flushed, authorities said Tuesday. While some inmates complained about serving unnecessarily hard time during the weekend mishap, sheriff's officials said a team of plumbers had worked around the clock to fix the problem at the $373-million facility, which was opened in January.
OPINION
March 9, 2014 | By Dinah Hatton
If you're a city person, you might only have read of chamber pots, an inconvenient though useful contraption from an earlier time. In the part of Texas where I grew up, the term "chamber pot" was a tad too genteel. We called these essentials "slop jars" or just "the pot. " Whatever you called it, I had to empty it. Our house sat on a slight rise facing busy Highway 31. The outhouse was back of the house, toward the woods, maybe 50 feet away. PHOTOS: 5 Senate women to watch in 2014 It was tricky running with the pot to the outhouse.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vice President Dan Quayle has discussed the possibility that the aged plumbing system at the vice presidential mansion might be linked to Graves' disease, the thyroid ailment suffered by President and Barbara Bush, a published report said. David Beckwith, press aide to Quayle, told the New York Times that Quayle and his wife wondered if the plumbing at the mansion might be involved. The Bushes lived at the vice president's quarters for eight years before moving to the White House.
NEWS
March 23, 1994 | From Associated Press
The plumbing at Riverside General Hospital could not have leaked toxic fumes that overcame an emergency room crew treating a patient in February, authorities said Tuesday. A review of the plumbing system eliminated any possible link between pipes in the hospital and the Feb. 19 incident in which patient Gloria Ramirez died and six doctors, nurses and attendants got sick or passed out after some noticed an ammonia-like smell.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1993 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Daniel Rossel, a Culver City plumber, believes that he has a new product that will shake up the plumbing business in America, one that could create a new multimillion-dollar industry and generate hundreds--maybe thousands--of jobs in Southern California. But he is worried that the city of Los Angeles may not give him the opportunity to start his business here.
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | LYNN SIMROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Water cutbacks or increased costs got you in a tizzy about how to reduce your household usage? Although some California cities have ordered water cutbacks, others are still in the voluntary stage. But residents of those cities can be sure that mandated reduction of water usage is coming, sooner than later. So what can you do? Sit down and figure out how much you are willing to spend to retrofit your home, condominium or apartment with water-saving devices.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Price Pfister Inc., a major plumbing-supplies maker in Pacoima, is apparently hurting from publicity surrounding the lead that its faucets leave in drinking water. Last month the state attorney general filed suit against Price Pfister, and more than 20 other major faucet companies, for selling products that leach too much lead into water. The suit is intended to force manufacturers to stop selling these faucets, or substantially reduce the lead in their products.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Diego jury ordered Shell Chemical Co. and two other companies to pay almost $50 million in punitive damages to homeowners and a developer for water damage caused by faulty plumbing pipe that the companies manufactured. The class-action lawsuit was brought by 41 San Diego homeowners and the builder of the Briarwood Pointe project against Shell Chemical Co., the U.S. Brass unit of Eljer Industries Inc. and Hoechst Celanese Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
Who knows what danger lurks in your plumbing? If you grew up in Southern California after 1965 and watched any of the major TV channels, it's likely you know the answer: "Adee do!" Those words were drilled into pop-culture posterity by a series of campy commercials that played day and night for decades thanks to Jack Stephan, a flamboyant entrepreneur with a flair for marketing who founded two of the region's most heavily advertised plumbing companies. "He was the Cal Worthington of plumbing," Jack Stephan Jr. said of his father, who died of natural causes Saturday at Torrance Memorial Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2014 | By Amy Dawes
For Showtime, landing Michael Sheen as the lead in "Masters of Sex," the drama about William Masters and Virginia Johnson and their groundbreaking midcentury research into human sexuality, meant agreeing to film the series in Los Angeles, where Sheen could be close to his teenage daughter - and thereby giving up the sizable tax break dangled by the state of New York. So it must have come as some relief that, along with its critical accolades, the first-season show has been recognized with two Golden Globe nominations: one for best drama and one for Sheen's performance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Maybe I've watched the movie "Chinatown" too many times, but a major justification for digging Gov. Jerry Brown's massive water tunnels just seems suspicious. Brown's not creating a drought by dumping water in the ocean and poisoning wells, as Noah Cross (John Huston) does in the classic film inspired by Los Angeles' draining of the Owens Valley. Developer Cross was selling L.A. voters on the need for a water bond to finance an aqueduct and reservoir. Brown and the water buffaloes - government bureaucrats, corporate farmers, urban expansionists - are peddling their own rationale for a $25-billion re-plumbing of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Bill's daughter recently purchased a house, and it came with a home warranty. Then the trouble started. She took a shower and discovered that water was seeping out of the walls. Yow! Bill's daughter contacted the warranty provider and was told the policy didn't cover plumbing. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions Bill asks: Is that how these things usually work? And the answer is: No. Most home warranties cover plumbing, along with most other major systems and appliances.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
Written with a poet's ear and directed with an artist's eye, "Forgetting the Girl" plumbs the psyche of an unassuming studio photographer, Kevin Wolfe (Christopher Denham). Traumatized by his sister's drowning when they were kids, he compensates by asking out the women who come to him for head shots. He's looking for a "real girl," not the porn stars whose photos his landlord lusts over - the salacious content of which isn't shown on-screen but, in a masterful touch by director Nate Taylor, revealed by viewers' reactions to them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Federal agencies reviewing draft environmental documents for the state's proposal to re-plumb the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta are criticizing the work as "insufficient," "biased" and "confusing. " The federal comments suggest it's going to be tough for the state to meet its self-imposed deadline of releasing the draft this October for official public comment, an important step in moving the project forward. In what would be the biggest water supply project constructed in California in half a century, the state is proposing to build a large diversion point on the Sacramento River in the north delta and send the water through two 35-mile tunnels to aqueducts serving the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1992 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several ownership changes in the 1980s, faucet maker Price Pfister Inc. seems securely nestled in the fold of its owner, Black & Decker Corp., the power-tools and household-products giant. But whether Black & Decker can help Pacoima-based Price Pfister climb above its perennial No. 3 spot in the U. S. faucet market is an open question. The added distribution channels provided by Black & Decker, which had 1991 sales of $4.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Jennifer Gilmore
Adelle Waldman's debut novel, "The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.," chronicles just that: Nathaniel Piven's love affairs. Nate lives in Brooklyn. He's a writer. The constant portrayal of Brooklyn in the media has made the New York borough ubiquitous. Despite this crisis of setting, Waldman has an uncanny way of getting into the mind - and cold heart - of Nate. And although the novel is about his love affairs in Brooklyn, this is really a novel that reveals - astutely - how Nate thinks. Nate is a Harvard grad, the son of Eastern European immigrants who have high expectations for him. Though he is accruing accomplishments - he reviews often for an unnamed important literary journal, and he has a lucrative book contract for a novel being published by a prestigious, unnamed publisher - his financial life, as with his romantic life, is unstable.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
Did you spend seven hours watching the Sundance Channel's crime-drama "Top of the Lake" and still feel like you didn't quite understand what Holly Hunter's oracle, GJ, was all about? Hunter doesn't exactly blame you since many of the mysteries surrounding the enigmatic character were never fully solved. But that didn't stop Hunter from having a go at them in a live chat that you can watch here. The Oscar-winning actress talks about her reunion with director Jane Campion ("The Piano")
Los Angeles Times Articles
|