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NEWS
October 7, 2010 | By Michael Muskal
President Obama will not sign a bill that could hurt homeowners seeking to challenge mortgage foreclosures, the White House announced Thursday. At his briefing, spokesman Robert Gibbs said Obama would use a pocket veto to prevent the bill, which passed both the House and the Senate, from becoming law. A pocket veto is when the president refuses to sign a bill. Designed as a consumer bill, the foreclosure measure could save banks and other mortgage processors from liability in how a foreclosure is processed.
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NEWS
October 7, 2010 | By Michael Muskal
President Obama will not sign a bill that could hurt homeowners seeking to challenge mortgage foreclosures, the White House announced Thursday. At his briefing, spokesman Robert Gibbs said Obama would use a pocket veto to prevent the bill, which passed both the House and the Senate, from becoming law. A pocket veto is when the president refuses to sign a bill. Designed as a consumer bill, the foreclosure measure could save banks and other mortgage processors from liability in how a foreclosure is processed.
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NEWS
March 3, 1986 | Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court today agreed to referee a major confrontation between President Reagan and Congress over the use of the so-called pocket veto. The court said it will review a ruling that Reagan illegally used a pocket veto in 1983 to kill a bill linking military aid to El Salvador with human rights progress by that country. The court's action sets the stage for a decision, probably sometime in 1987, on far-reaching questions of presidential and congressional powers. On Aug.
OPINION
January 8, 2008 | Robert J. Spitzer, Robert J. Spitzer is a political science professor at SUNY Cortland. His books include "The Presidential Veto."
Pundits and pols who have been tracking President Bush's constitutional transgressions can add another to the list: his Dec. 28 "pocket veto" of the massive defense spending bill. Instead of issuing a regular veto, which allows Congress the opportunity to override if it can muster the votes, Bush stated that he needed to pocket veto the bill -- a power the Constitution says may only be used when "Congress by their Adjournment prevent [the bill's] Return."
OPINION
January 8, 2008 | Robert J. Spitzer, Robert J. Spitzer is a political science professor at SUNY Cortland. His books include "The Presidential Veto."
Pundits and pols who have been tracking President Bush's constitutional transgressions can add another to the list: his Dec. 28 "pocket veto" of the massive defense spending bill. Instead of issuing a regular veto, which allows Congress the opportunity to override if it can muster the votes, Bush stated that he needed to pocket veto the bill -- a power the Constitution says may only be used when "Congress by their Adjournment prevent [the bill's] Return."
NEWS
March 4, 1986 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, moving to resolve a constitutional impasse between the Reagan Administration and members of Congress, said Monday that it will decide when the President may exercise a "pocket veto" to kill legislation he opposes. The justices will hear a Justice Department appeal of a lower court ruling that found that President Reagan had illegally used the historic device to invalidate a bill Congress passed in 1983 conditioning aid to El Salvador on progress in human rights. The U.S.
NEWS
April 11, 1989
Calling whistle-blowers "public servants of the highest order," President Bush signed legislation to give more protection to federal employees who expose waste, fraud and abuse in government. At a ceremony in the auditorium of the Executive Office Building, Bush signed into law the Whistle-blowers Protection Act of 1989, which he said is free of the "constitutional flaws" that led former President Ronald Reagan to pocket veto a similar bill last October. The bill's key features, fundamentally unchanged from the vetoed version, would establish a simpler and fairer standard for whistle-blowers to prove retaliation by their bosses and would give them the right to appeal their cases to the Merit Systems Protection Board if the government's Office of Special Counsel fails to do so.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1986
On Wednesday President Reagan said that he looked forward to bipartisan cooperation with the new Democratic-controlled 100th Congress. On Thursday he made a mockery of his own words with his pocket veto of the Clean Water Act. The veto was outrageous. The manner in which it was executed was shameful. Had he scoured the history of the presidency, Reagan probably could not have found a more effective way of setting up a direct confrontation with a new Congress.
NEWS
November 14, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan today vetoed the NASA authorization bill for 1987 containing approval for a fourth space shuttle because it contains a provision that he said "would constitute unacceptable interference with my discretion" and create "additional and unnecessary bureaucracy." In issuing the pocket veto, Reagan said NASA's ongoing programs will not be affected because the money for 1987 already has been appropriated.
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | Associated Press
The Senate today approved new limits on imports of textiles, clothing and shoes, defying the threat of a veto just weeks before November elections. The bill, aimed at protecting American manufacturers from foreign competition, would freeze this year's imports of textiles, apparel and non-rubber footwear at 1987 levels and limit their growth to 1% annually thereafter.
NEWS
April 11, 1989
Calling whistle-blowers "public servants of the highest order," President Bush signed legislation to give more protection to federal employees who expose waste, fraud and abuse in government. At a ceremony in the auditorium of the Executive Office Building, Bush signed into law the Whistle-blowers Protection Act of 1989, which he said is free of the "constitutional flaws" that led former President Ronald Reagan to pocket veto a similar bill last October. The bill's key features, fundamentally unchanged from the vetoed version, would establish a simpler and fairer standard for whistle-blowers to prove retaliation by their bosses and would give them the right to appeal their cases to the Merit Systems Protection Board if the government's Office of Special Counsel fails to do so.
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | Associated Press
The Senate today approved new limits on imports of textiles, clothing and shoes, defying the threat of a veto just weeks before November elections. The bill, aimed at protecting American manufacturers from foreign competition, would freeze this year's imports of textiles, apparel and non-rubber footwear at 1987 levels and limit their growth to 1% annually thereafter.
NEWS
November 14, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan today vetoed the NASA authorization bill for 1987 containing approval for a fourth space shuttle because it contains a provision that he said "would constitute unacceptable interference with my discretion" and create "additional and unnecessary bureaucracy." In issuing the pocket veto, Reagan said NASA's ongoing programs will not be affected because the money for 1987 already has been appropriated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1986
On Wednesday President Reagan said that he looked forward to bipartisan cooperation with the new Democratic-controlled 100th Congress. On Thursday he made a mockery of his own words with his pocket veto of the Clean Water Act. The veto was outrageous. The manner in which it was executed was shameful. Had he scoured the history of the presidency, Reagan probably could not have found a more effective way of setting up a direct confrontation with a new Congress.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan on Wednesday pocket-vetoed a Federal Maritime Commission authorization bill, saying it failed to eliminate a maritime loan program he found objectionable.
NEWS
March 4, 1986 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, moving to resolve a constitutional impasse between the Reagan Administration and members of Congress, said Monday that it will decide when the President may exercise a "pocket veto" to kill legislation he opposes. The justices will hear a Justice Department appeal of a lower court ruling that found that President Reagan had illegally used the historic device to invalidate a bill Congress passed in 1983 conditioning aid to El Salvador on progress in human rights. The U.S.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan on Wednesday pocket-vetoed a Federal Maritime Commission authorization bill, saying it failed to eliminate a maritime loan program he found objectionable.
NEWS
March 3, 1986 | Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court today agreed to referee a major confrontation between President Reagan and Congress over the use of the so-called pocket veto. The court said it will review a ruling that Reagan illegally used a pocket veto in 1983 to kill a bill linking military aid to El Salvador with human rights progress by that country. The court's action sets the stage for a decision, probably sometime in 1987, on far-reaching questions of presidential and congressional powers. On Aug.
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