Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPoetry
IN THE NEWS

Poetry

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011
'Poetry' Unrated Running time: 2 hours, 19 minutes Playing: At Laemmle's Royal, West Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
[ This story has been corrected. See bottom of post for details .] National Poetry Month is almost over, but we'd be remiss to overlook “Jimmy's Blues and Other Poems” by James Baldwin (Beacon: 94 pp., $16 paper), which collects all 25 poems the essayist and novelist published before his death in 1987 at age 63. If you didn't know Baldwin was a poet, you're not alone - although it makes sense because his prose was always visionary and poetic, built on a torrent, a flow of words.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
There is a knife in this story. And by the time you get to the end, someone is going to use it. Tipping you off to the knife is a dramatic lesson taken from Anton Chekhov, one of Russia's great playwrights and short story writers. Russia has a history full of indelible writers of fiction: Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky and Nikolai Gogol, just to name a few. Poets haven't made as big an impression on English-language readers, but from Alexander Pushkin's time to the present, poetry has been a big part of the literary discussion in Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
LAS VEGAS - Telling friends that you're heading to Las Vegas for some Shakespeare is a bit like claiming you read Playboy for the interviews. Well, I did indeed head to Vegas last weekend to see "The Tempest," and I can guarantee that I was the only person on my morning flight reading Harold C. Goddard's classic "The Meaning of Shakespeare. " Just a few pages from the chapter on "The Tempest," mind you. The guys downing pre-lunch wine and cocktails around me were whooping it up "Hangover"-style.
NEWS
September 20, 2012
The first poem Peleg Top put in the poetry box outside his Silver Lake home: “Bless This Journey” I look ahead and see no destination I look behind and see thousands of questions I look down and hear my heart melting I look forward and take a deep breath   The next step could be the one that drowns me that drops me into my abyss   The next step could be the one that leads me into my unknown ...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Twenty or so years ago, Lou Reed - who died Sunday of liver failure at 71 - published a book called “Beyond Thought and Expression: Selected Lyrics” that casts in stark relief the promise and the pretension of thinking about rock lyrics as poetry. Reed, of course, always considered himself in such terms, tracing a lineage to the story writer and poet Delmore Schwartz , who had been his teacher at Syracuse University, creating with the Velvet Underground (and later, in solo efforts such as “Berlin,” “Street Hassle,” “New York” and “Songs for Drella” )
HEALTH
May 10, 2010 | By Robert Oliphant, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My name is Bob and I'm an exercise coward. I've tried to stick with various exercise programs but always failed until I reached 71 and my Kaiser internist prodded me into an honest shot at losing weight. To my surprise, this time I was able to stick with it — all because of a Higher Power, namely William Shakespeare. My Higher Power had hooked up with me five years earlier when my fear of senile dementia had pushed me into memorizing 20 of his most famous sonnets as a brain exercise.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Poetry" is daring in the ways only quiet, unhurried but finally haunting films have the courage to be. A character study of remarkable subtlety joined to a carefully worked-out plot that fearlessly explores big issues like beauty, truth and mortality, it marks the further emergence of Korean writer-director Lee Chang-dong. Lee's script for this film took the best screenplay prize at Cannes last year, and his previous directing effort, 2008's "Secret Sunshine," won the festival's best actress award for Jeon Do-yeon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
It's tempting to read the Greek poet Yannis Ritsos , who died in 1990 at the age of 81, as an embodiment (of sorts) of Percy Bysshe Shelley's admonition that “[p]oets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world.” A lifelong communist, he was sent into internal exile in the late 1940s and later held under house arrest after a military dictatorship took over Greece in 1967. And yet, if much of Ritsos' work is explicitly political, he can also be among the most personal of poets, tracing in spare and lyrical language the substance of his days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1998
Whether it is haiku, the sonnets of William Shakespeare or the lyrical truths of Maya Angelou, poetry has long been an important art form that illuminates the human experience. Today's rappers use rhyme and vivid imagery to capture important moments in their lives. Explore the role of poets and poetry through the direct links on The Times' Launch Point Web site: http://www.latimes.com/launchpoint Here are the best sites for getting your schoolwork done or for just having fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Claremont Graduate University announced Wednesday that Afaa Michael Weaver is the recipient of the $100,000 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for his collection "The Government of Nature. " The award, one of the nation's most substantial poetry prizes, is given annually to a midcareer poet. Weaver was born in Baltimore, the eldest of five children of a beautician mother and steelworker father. He grew up a big reader and started college, then dropped out in 1970. That was the year his girlfriend got pregnant, they married, and lost their son at 11 months.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
This is not a light and easy Valentine's Day book recommendation. The Russian poet Vera Pavlova is a fiercely sensual writer. Her collection, “If There Is Something to Desire: One Hundred Poems,” is not the sort of book you buy for someone you've just met. No, it's for that person you've broken up with and gotten back together with three or four times times. For the sort of relationship where you've loved someone and also hurt and screamed at them, and they've hurt you, and yet you always end up back with them because you know they are who you were meant to be with.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Christopher Reynolds
This week should be a joyous one For couples back together. But all these storms chased off the fun, Replaced the love with weather.   St. Valentine would hardly cheer At all those stranded solo, Alone in airports, left to jeer As agents all say no-go.   The TSA did pat you down And maybe that was thrilling. But now your laptop's charge is gone With ten hours to be killing.   Your dreams of romance after sunset? In terminal condition.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
Writer Andy Cochran shows off a truly authentic voice in his delightfully off-kilter script for "Adult World," a smart, incisive comedy about a recent college grad's booby-trapped immersion into real life. Directed by actor-filmmaker Scott Coffey ("Ellie Parker"), this darkly funny film involves 22-year-old Amy (a game Emma Roberts), an intellectually entitled, rather clueless poet hellbent on literary stardom. But when Amy's strapped parents (Catherine Lloyd Burns, Reed Birney) announce they can no longer finance her dream, she's forced to take a job clerking at Adult World, a faded porn shop owned by a pair of frisky seniors (Cloris Leachman, John Cullum)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
With a strong push from MTV, spoken-word poetry went mainstream in the mid-1990s, and Maggie Estep was its leading lady. Dressed in black, often backed by a rock band, Estep was a sassy, slightly twisted New Yorker who wrote and performed humorous, biting pieces that merged poetry with stand-up comedy. A regular at Manhattan's Nuyorican Poets Café, the center of the poetry slam movement, she was a crowd favorite for pieces with titles like "Hey Baby" and "The Stupid Jerk I'm Obsessed With.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
Decades before she won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, Maxine Kumin was a student at Radcliffe College who had summoned the courage to show a handful of her poems to an instructor. His comment couldn't have been more withering. "Say it with flowers," he wrote, "but for God's sake don't try to write poems. " Kumin heeded his advice. Seven years passed before she tried again, but this time her efforts brought far more encouraging results. With a clear-eyed vision of the natural world, relationships, mortality and the inner lives of women, Kumin became one of the country's most honored poets, whose fourth book of poetry, "Up Country," brought her the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Holly Myers
In a welcome follow-up to "Requiem for the Sun, " Blum & Poe's superb survey earlier this year of the art of Japan's Mono-ha movement, the gallery has assembled another, similarly museum-grade survey exploring the work of one of its leading figures, Kishio Suga. With 86 works spanning more than 40 years, it is a substantial undertaking - Suga's first solo exhibition in North America, and the first single-artist show to occupy both floors of the gallery's prodigious space. It feels light and fresh, almost spontaneously generative.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
There is a knife in this story. And by the time you get to the end, someone is going to use it. Tipping you off to the knife is a dramatic lesson taken from Anton Chekhov, one of Russia's great playwrights and short story writers. Russia has a history full of indelible writers of fiction: Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky and Nikolai Gogol, just to name a few. Poets haven't made as big an impression on English-language readers, but from Alexander Pushkin's time to the present, poetry has been a big part of the literary discussion in Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Amiri Baraka died Thursday after weeks of failing health, a family spokeperson confirmed. He was 79. A playwright, poet, critic and activist, Baraka was one of the most prominent and controversial African American voices in the world of American letters. He was born Everett LeRoi Jones on Oct. 7, 1934, in Newark, N.J. A gifted student, he graduated from high school two years early and went to college at New York University and Howard University. After serving in the Air Force for more than two years, Baraka -- then Jones -- was dishonorably discharged for reading communist texts.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|