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Poisons And Poisonings

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1995
Investigators were awaiting autopsy results Thursday in the apparent carbon monoxide poisoning death in a Mammoth Lakes ski resort of an FBI agent from Santa Clarita, authorities said Thursday. Special Agent Walter Weber, 42, was pronounced dead Sunday after he was found lying in his room at the North Village Inn. His wife, Molly Smith Weber, 36, vice president for college textbook publishing at Houghton Mifflin Co.
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SPORTS
September 20, 1994 | From Associated Press
Former tennis star Vitas Gerulaitis apparently died of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning, police said Monday night. Gerulaitis, 40, appeared to have been overcome by the fumes from a "faulty propane heater installation" that seeped into the heating and air conditioning system of a friend's home, Southampton Village police said. Police said they did not know whether Gerulaitis was asleep at the time of the accident.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | From United Press International
A 45-year-old former feed store worker was indicted Tuesday in the deliberate poisoning of the centuries-old Treaty Oak. The Travis County indictment charged Paul S. Cullen, of Elroy, with felony criminal mischief that caused in excess of $20,000 damage to the historic tree. Because of a previous burglary conviction, prosecutors said the charge was enhanced to a first-degree felony. Cullen, who could be sentenced to life in prison if convicted, has been in jail since his arrest June 29.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1991 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kagel Canyon is the kind of neighborhood where people leave their doors unlocked. Set amid steep ravines of oak and pine trees, the homes here sit secluded from the urban East San Fernando Valley just a few miles down the hill. In this neighborhood, people have always let their children and dogs run free. But last October, at a neighborhood party, two pet dogs went into convulsions and died within minutes. Since then, seven more dogs have perished the same way.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whites brought disease and war to American Indians during the last century and it took a heavy toll, but scientists here now think that at least one major tribe, the Omahas, may have been ravaged to near extinction by a stunningly different pioneer import. "Why did they die?" poses anthropologist Karl Reinhard. "Subtle lead poisoning."
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | Associated Press
The daughter of the first person in the nation charged with causing death by tampering with over-the-counter drug capsules is prepared to testify for the prosecution, government lawyers said Monday. The disclosure was contained in a pretrial brief filed by Assistant U.S. Atty. Joanne Maida as jury selection began in the trial of Stella Nickell, 44, in U.S. District Court.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | Associated Press
A illness that caused 127 children in a Ukrainian town to lose their hair was probably caused by acid rain that carried high doses of thallium, a newspaper reported Thursday. "Since there are no sources of the discharge of thallium into the environment in Chernovtsy and its environs, a conclusion was drawn that the chemical was introduced to the area by acid rains in July," the Communist Party daily Pravda said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2000 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dog owners in a Huntington Beach neighborhood were in an uproar Monday after the apparent poisonings of two pets in adjacent backyards on the same day. "People are in a state of shock," said Steve Quinn, a pet owner and professional dog walker who lives near Lakeside and Arrow lanes, where the dogs died. "You couldn't have picked a worse place for this to happen."
NEWS
June 25, 1996 | From Associated Press
Aging plastic mini-blinds can cause lead poisoning in young children, the government warned Monday. "They are throughout the country. You find them everywhere," said Kathleen Begala, spokeswoman for the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Every year, 25 million non-glossy, vinyl mini-blinds are imported into the United States from China, Taiwan, Mexico and Indonesia. Lead is added during production to stabilize the plastic in the blinds.
NEWS
November 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A top Russian public health official said 27,000 people in the nation have died this year as a result of alcohol poisoning. "That's a whole village full of people, mostly men," said Gennady Onishchenko, first deputy health minister. Onishchenko has warned repeatedly that excessive drinking is on the rise in Russia, and the problem is exacerbated by the poor quality of much of the alcohol. Home-distilled vodka and other spirits remain popular and may contain harmful impurities.
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