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Poisons And Poisonings

WORLD
December 7, 2006 | David Holley and Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writers
British authorities Wednesday formally classified the recent poisoning death of a dissident former Russian spy as a murder case, changing it from the category of a suspicious death. Alexander Litvinenko is believed to have been poisoned with radioactive polonium-210, probably on Nov. 1, when he met with several people in London.
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WORLD
December 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Former Russian Prime Minister Yegor T. Gaidar was released from the hospital Monday following a mysterious illness that raised suspicions of another poisoning after a former KGB agent died in London of radiation poisoning. Gaidar, a 50-year-old economist and leader of a Russian liberal opposition party, fell ill at a conference outside Dublin, Ireland, a day after former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko died of poisoning by the radioactive isotope polonium-210.
WORLD
December 4, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
British authorities said Sunday that they were widening their investigation of the poisoning of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko on the heels of a fresh series of leads into the Russian's murky political and business connections stretching from Moscow to the U.S. "Over the next few days, I think all of these things will widen out a little from the circle just being here in Britain," Home Secretary John Reid told the "Sunday Live With Adam Boulton" program of Britain's Sky News.
WORLD
December 2, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
An Italian KGB expert who had warned poisoned Russian dissident Alexander Litvinenko that his life might be in danger has a "significant quantity" of radioactive polonium-210 in his body, authorities said Friday. British health officials also said they had detected a small quantity in a close relative of Litvinenko. Neither has shown signs of illness.
WORLD
December 1, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Irish authorities launched an inquiry Thursday into the sudden and violent illness of former Russian Prime Minister Yegor T. Gaidar, whose aides said he might have been the victim of poisoning. Gaidar's illness appeared to deepen the mystery surrounding the fatal poisoning of Russian dissident Alexander Litvinenko, in London, though investigators did not indicate that the cases were linked. Litvinenko died last week. Gaidar, 50, suddenly fell ill Saturday at a university near Dublin.
WORLD
November 30, 2006 | Sebastian Rotella and Janet Stobart, Times Staff Writers
Investigators found traces of radiation on two British Airways planes Wednesday as police widened a complex international investigation into the mysterious poisoning death last week of a former Russian spy. The discovery of polonium-210, the rare and lethal radioactive substance that killed Alexander Litvinenko and ignited a public health scare, could be a sign that police are on the trail of a suspected killer who traveled between London and Moscow.
WORLD
November 25, 2006 | Sebastian Rotella and Janet Stobart, Times Staff Writers
Counter-terrorism police investigating the mysterious death of a Russian spy-turned-dissident warned Friday of a potential public health hazard at two hospitals that treated him and three other locations where officials found traces of the radioactive material thought to have killed him. On a day of dramatic revelations and accusations, authorities said they believed Alexander Litvinenko, a former KGB agent and a fierce critic of Russian President Vladimir V.
WORLD
November 24, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A former Russian spy who said he had been poisoned died Thursday night at a London hospital after a mysterious and rapid decline that left doctors puzzled over the cause of death, officials said. Alexander Litvinenko, a fierce critic of the Russian government, had suffered heart failure and was heavily sedated as medical staff struggled to pinpoint what had made the 43-year-old critically ill.
WORLD
November 22, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Here in Moscow on the Thames, it was a calling card from home. A former KGB agent who has settled in London to raise his family gets a warning that his name is on an organized crime hit list, then falls ill from a mysterious poisoning. Theories involving the Kremlin and sinister business figures tumble around town like blinis from a hot pan. Suddenly, the elegant Mayfair townhouses with window-box geraniums and the Chelsea gastro pubs with designer vodka don't seem so far from Russia after all.
WORLD
November 21, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
A former KGB agent who had accused the Russian security services of involvement in several killings was transferred to intensive care Monday after British doctors confirmed he had been the victim of a deadly nerve poison. Alexander Litvinenko, 41, a Kremlin critic who has lived in Britain for several years, suffered a slight setback over the weekend and remained in serious condition, hospital officials in London said.
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