Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPoland Culture
IN THE NEWS

Poland Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1991 | GRETA BEIGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly half a century, the remains of Ignace Jan Paderewski, renowned pianist, composer and beloved Polish statesman, have rested in a zinc casket at the base of the mast of the USS Maine memorial at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. If all had gone according to plan, his remains would have been transferred to Poland for a state burial June 29, the 50th anniversary of his death. A celebratory concert in Warsaw with some of the biggest names in music was scheduled.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish artist Zbigniew Libera is passing up the opportunity of a lifetime for the sake of some Lego toys packed away in the storeroom of an art gallery here. "I couldn't sleep the entire night after making up my mind," he said. "But I had to refuse. For me, the whole thing is very clear." Libera was invited to participate in next month's Venice Biennale exposition in Italy, one of the world's premier arts events and a dream come true for any struggling artist.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish artist Zbigniew Libera is passing up the opportunity of a lifetime for the sake of some Lego toys packed away in the storeroom of an art gallery here. "I couldn't sleep the entire night after making up my mind," he said. "But I had to refuse. For me, the whole thing is very clear." Libera was invited to participate in next month's Venice Biennale exposition in Italy, one of the world's premier arts events and a dream come true for any struggling artist.
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The circles beneath the eyes of Police Chief Jerzy Stanczyk are dark and heavy, the battle wounds of a hellish few weeks. Stanczyk is struggling for control of Warsaw, his underworld adversaries taunting him like a caged animal. For more than a month, a gang of thugs, many with lengthy criminal records and alleged ties to organized crime, have terrorized restaurant and store owners in Old Town, the capital's historic center and the cobblestoned home to its most popular eateries and galleries.
NEWS
June 11, 1988 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
It is dacha season in Poland, and Ewa Lukasiak is where you will find her on most weekend days for the next two or three months--digging in the garden behind the small country house that she built for herself about six years ago. "You have to be careful of the roots," she tells her neighbor, who watches skeptically as Lukasiak's muddy fingers carefully separate the clods of dirt surrounding the new lettuce plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1990 | DAVID LEWIN
Eminent domain, strictly speaking, is a legal term--an elegant euphemism for the right of the state to appropriate all property within its frontiers. As applied in Communist countries before the dramatic events of recent months, eminent domain also included the lives, emotions and hopes of the people who lived there. Now, it is the title of a film being made by an international cast and crew looking at events in Poland that could not have possibly been looked at from inside that country . . .
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lazienki Park is a civic treasure nestled amid the postwar Communist concrete of Warsaw. For the past 18 years, Urszula Maciejewska, a diminutive woman with short red hair and enormous energy, has worked as a conservationist in the park and now heads a staff of 40. They are largely devoted to caring for the park's magnificent trees, some of which, at least in age and size, are thought to be unique in Europe.
NEWS
April 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Poland was all wet on Monday. Nationwide, young people hurled buckets of water at each other in the annual post-Easter folk holiday of "Pouring Monday." In Warsaw, the teen-agers also doused a few police officers who wandered by the good-natured and vaguely political water games that pitted a contingent of "Smurfs" dressed in blue against green-clad "Water People" in Castle Square.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is not easy to conceive of this city as "the Paris of the East," but if you come from Byelorussia, the Ukraine or the lumpen suburbs of Moscow, Riga or Vilnius, the old Polish capital beckons with a distinct glitter. True, the sparkle is more that of the Klondike in the Gold Rush than of the City of Light.
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The circles beneath the eyes of Police Chief Jerzy Stanczyk are dark and heavy, the battle wounds of a hellish few weeks. Stanczyk is struggling for control of Warsaw, his underworld adversaries taunting him like a caged animal. For more than a month, a gang of thugs, many with lengthy criminal records and alleged ties to organized crime, have terrorized restaurant and store owners in Old Town, the capital's historic center and the cobblestoned home to its most popular eateries and galleries.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Mazowsze Polish touring folk dance troupe are allowed to moan about cramped quarters on the bus, grouse over hotel accommodations or bellyache even during rehearsals. But in accordance with an ironclad company mandate, once the curtain rises on a performance, "You just cannot complain anymore," says deputy director Brygida Linartas. "These songs and dances bring joy, and you have to express this joy, sheer joy."
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | JANET EASTMAN, Janet Eastman is assistant editor of The Times Orange County View section.
It's easy to check into Lech Walesa Inn. No need to board a plane, pack a passport or stuff your wallet full of zlotys. You just have to drive to Yorba Linda this weekend. The Inn, where patrons are served such cafe fare as czarnina (duck's blood soup) and kiszka (pork and barley sausage), is temporarily on-site at the Pope John Paul II Polish Center. It's one of the many offerings of Dozynki '91, the center's 13th annual harvest festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1991 | GRETA BEIGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly half a century, the remains of Ignace Jan Paderewski, renowned pianist, composer and beloved Polish statesman, have rested in a zinc casket at the base of the mast of the USS Maine memorial at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. If all had gone according to plan, his remains would have been transferred to Poland for a state burial June 29, the 50th anniversary of his death. A celebratory concert in Warsaw with some of the biggest names in music was scheduled.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is not easy to conceive of this city as "the Paris of the East," but if you come from Byelorussia, the Ukraine or the lumpen suburbs of Moscow, Riga or Vilnius, the old Polish capital beckons with a distinct glitter. True, the sparkle is more that of the Klondike in the Gold Rush than of the City of Light.
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lazienki Park is a civic treasure nestled amid the postwar Communist concrete of Warsaw. For the past 18 years, Urszula Maciejewska, a diminutive woman with short red hair and enormous energy, has worked as a conservationist in the park and now heads a staff of 40. They are largely devoted to caring for the park's magnificent trees, some of which, at least in age and size, are thought to be unique in Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1990 | DAVID LEWIN
Eminent domain, strictly speaking, is a legal term--an elegant euphemism for the right of the state to appropriate all property within its frontiers. As applied in Communist countries before the dramatic events of recent months, eminent domain also included the lives, emotions and hopes of the people who lived there. Now, it is the title of a film being made by an international cast and crew looking at events in Poland that could not have possibly been looked at from inside that country . . .
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was raining on market day in Jadow when Zdzislaw Okninski, the local Communist naczelnik , or village leader, walked through the mud in his good brown suit, the one with the broken zipper, looking for someone to talk to. He had gotten a late start for his market tour, his weekly morning of "meeting the people." The usual crowd had thinned out, and he had to troll the length of the market and start over before he hooked someone. "So how are the prices?" he ventured.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Mazowsze Polish touring folk dance troupe are allowed to moan about cramped quarters on the bus, grouse over hotel accommodations or bellyache even during rehearsals. But in accordance with an ironclad company mandate, once the curtain rises on a performance, "You just cannot complain anymore," says deputy director Brygida Linartas. "These songs and dances bring joy, and you have to express this joy, sheer joy."
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was raining on market day in Jadow when Zdzislaw Okninski, the local Communist naczelnik , or village leader, walked through the mud in his good brown suit, the one with the broken zipper, looking for someone to talk to. He had gotten a late start for his market tour, his weekly morning of "meeting the people." The usual crowd had thinned out, and he had to troll the length of the market and start over before he hooked someone. "So how are the prices?" he ventured.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | BLAINE HARDEN, THE WASHINGTON POST
The future of private television in the Eastern Bloc is here on the 11th floor of a student dormitory, in a windowless janitor's room where three wall calendars depict Polish women in various stages of undress. As far as hardware is concerned, there is not much else in the broadcast center of Echo TV-Channel 28 to catch the eye.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|