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Poland Government

NEWS
December 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Poland's two-month-long government crisis ended when Parliament narrowly voted to accept a Cabinet that is likely to loosen the tough economic austerity program of President Lech Walesa. Last week, legislators gave Prime Minister Jan Olszewski a vote of confidence by rejecting his resignation, which he filed after saying his feud with Walesa made it impossible to choose a Cabinet. Ultimately his choices, once rejected, were approved by lawmakers unwilling to prolong the crisis.
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NEWS
December 19, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime ministerial candidate Jan Olszewski was trudging back to the drawing boards Wednesday, instructed to try again to come up with an acceptable government after the Polish Parliament voted to reject his withdrawal from the office. Olszewski, 61, announced Tuesday that he had given up his efforts to form a government, in the wake of a cool reception by President Lech Walesa to his proposed Cabinet and because the center-right coalition that backed him had fallen apart.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight weeks after this nation's parliamentary elections, the second proposed candidate for prime minister gave up Tuesday on efforts to form a new Polish government and submitted his resignation to Parliament. Jan Olszewski--a 61-year-old lawyer who had been the candidate of a five-party center-right coalition advocating a slower approach to economic reform--blamed his failure on President Lech Walesa's lack of support for his proposed government.
NEWS
December 6, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing finally to the complicated arithmetic of the fractured Polish Parliament, President Lech Walesa on Thursday nominated for prime minister the candidate proposed by a center-right coalition with the largest chunk of votes in the legislature.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Lech Walesa on Friday nominated Bronislaw Geremek, a longtime adviser and more recently an adversary, to try to form Poland's next government. Geremek, who has been closely involved with Solidarity since the union was formed in 1980, represents the Democratic Union party, which finished in first place by a narrow margin in the Oct. 27 parliamentary elections. Democratic Union won only 13% of the votes in the splintered voting, which saw 29 parties gain seats in Parliament.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | Associated Press
Poland's President Lech Walesa, moving to create a government capable of decisive economic reform after elections that resulted in a splintered Parliament, proposed Tuesday that he become his own prime minister. Walesa said he expects to form a coalition made up of groups rooted in the Solidarity trade union movement, preferably with himself as prime minister. An alternative, he said, is a government of the seven parties that won the greatest number of votes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1991 | TERRY SPENCER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The paintings portray a Poland oppressive in its past, uncertain in its present, optimistic of its future. The work of artists Jerzy Wojciech Bielecki and Miroslawa Smerek, a husband-and-wife team from Poland, will be displayed at a convention this weekend of the Polish National Alliance, a 111-year-old nonprofit fraternal and insurance group to help Poles and Polish-Americans.
NEWS
September 3, 1991
Poland's Sejm (lower house of Parliament) is expected to debate this week a controversial bill that would give the Solidarity government special powers to issue decrees and break a legislative logjam holding up dozens of free-market reforms. The government also plans to ask for constitutional changes strengthening the powers of President Lech Walesa.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | Reuters
Poland's Solidarity government unveiled plans Monday to bypass Parliament temporarily on most economic issues and issue decrees with the force of law. The government sent a bill to the Sejm, or lower house, seeking special powers to issue decrees and break a legislative logjam holding up many free market reform measures. A communique said it will also ask the Sejm to pass constitutional changes permanently strengthening the executive at a special sitting this week.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | From Reuters
Poland's Solidarity government survived a tense parliamentary confrontation with ex-Communists on Saturday when Parliament refused to accept its resignation. The vote strengthened the government of Prime Minister Jan Krzysztof Bielecki and eased a three-day standoff that had threatened Poland with its worst political crisis since the overthrow of communism in 1989.
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