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Poland Politics

NEWS
November 21, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The undoing of a living legend with the historic stature of Polish President Lech Walesa comes rarely in politics. But for all the emotion surrounding Walesa's election defeat Sunday, there was little fear Monday that his successor would veer the country from the democratic and economic reforms Walesa toiled to secure. "The point of no return in Poland has been achieved," said Piotr Nowina-Konopka, an opposition member of Parliament and Walesa supporter.
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NEWS
November 20, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Lech Walesa, the hard-nosed shipyard electrician who helped topple the Communist regime in Poland, was in danger of being toppled himself by a former member of the regime in a runoff election Sunday. "If it happens, I will start singing, 'God, give us back our free homeland,' " said Solidarity trade union leader Marian Krzaklewski, on the verge of tears as early election results showed Walesa narrowly losing.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jozef Oleksy, a top official in Poland's last Communist government, moved a step closer Wednesday to becoming the country's next prime minister. But President Lech Walesa continued to make life difficult for the former Communist Party boss and his left-wing coalition. The Sejm, the lower house of Parliament, voted to oust the 16-month-old government of Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak and turned to Oleksy to form a new one. The vote had been expected after Pawlak agreed on Feb.
NEWS
February 18, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Communist Party official who helped negotiate the transfer of power to the Solidarity trade union has agreed to become Poland's next prime minister. But Jozef Oleksy, a onetime party boss and a minister in the country's last Communist government, may never get the job. Oleksy, 48, faces what many here consider to be an impossible task: making peace between his left-wing coalition government and President Lech Walesa, the only Solidarity-era figure still holding top office in Poland.
NEWS
October 29, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a moment it looked like a flashback from the 1980s, a dramatic televised scene of Poland's struggle to overthrow communism, featuring top players in the Solidarity reform movement. Solidarity strategist Bronislaw Geremek issued a stern warning about the sanctity of democracy. Solidarity journalist Tadeusz Mazowiecki lectured about civilian control of the military. And Solidarity activist Wladyslaw Frasyniuk accused the Polish president of authoritarian tendencies.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The spokeswoman in the government press office was apologetic, but there was nothing that she could do. The 13-sentence biography was the only information available on Waldemar Pawlak, Poland's new prime minister. The official release did not mention his wife's name, the names or ages of his three children, or anything about his life in the tiny village in central Poland where the farmer-turned-prime minister, now one month in office, got his political start eight years ago.
NEWS
September 20, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish voters issued a stunning rebuke to the country's aggressive economic reformers Sunday, giving two parties with Communist-era roots a majority of seats in the lower house of Parliament, according to preliminary projections early today. In just the second free parliamentary election since the collapse of communism in 1989, the biggest winner was the opposition Democratic Left Alliance, the successors to the former Communist Party.
NEWS
September 18, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just four years after the celebrated collapse of communism in Poland, the so-called invisible hand of capitalism is about to get slapped. Fed up with the stresses and strains of building a market economy from the shambles of communism, Poles are poised to do the seemingly unthinkable Sunday: elect a government with roots in the haunted past.
NEWS
August 8, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers at one of Poland's two auto plants are striking for a 150% pay raise. The government budget deficit has spiraled to double the relative size of the massive U.S. deficit. Members of as many as 20 parties are clawing for power in Parliament. Yet for all that, things have rarely looked so bright here since Poland led Eastern Europe's revolt against communism in 1989.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight weeks after this nation's parliamentary elections, the second proposed candidate for prime minister gave up Tuesday on efforts to form a new Polish government and submitted his resignation to Parliament. Jan Olszewski--a 61-year-old lawyer who had been the candidate of a five-party center-right coalition advocating a slower approach to economic reform--blamed his failure on President Lech Walesa's lack of support for his proposed government.
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