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Poland Politics

NEWS
October 26, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish voters will go to the polls Sunday to elect a new Parliament, one that will replace the Communist-dominated assembly that has complicated political and economic reform here for more than two years. Although it will be the first fully free parliamentary election here since the end of World War II, public opinion surveys suggest that a low voter turnout is expected, largely because of a poor public regard for politicians and political institutions.
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NEWS
September 1, 1991 | From Reuters
Poland's Solidarity government survived a tense parliamentary confrontation with ex-Communists on Saturday when Parliament refused to accept its resignation. The vote strengthened the government of Prime Minister Jan Krzysztof Bielecki and eased a three-day standoff that had threatened Poland with its worst political crisis since the overthrow of communism in 1989.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the summer season of strikes once again in Poland. On any given day, about 20 labor stoppages are going on, strike alerts are posted in factories, trams are shut down in the cities, buses stop running, garbage collectors stand sullen and idle beside their trucks. But this strike season has brought a significant change. The general public no longer finds itself alarmed or excited by strikes.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Lech Walesa has backed down, at least for now, from his threat to dissolve the Communist-dominated Parliament, but the political battle that surrounded Walesa's feint has suggested to Poles the presidential style that lies in store for them for the next five years. Based on evidence of the controversy surrounding Walesa's goading and threats to the Sejm, or Parliament, it will be, as some of Walesa's opponents predicted and feared, an activist presidency.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political struggle over Poland's economic recovery plan has intensified, with new threats of strikes and moves by President Lech Walesa to grant emergency powers to the government to dislodge stalled economic legislation in Parliament. Presidential aides say Walesa also is increasingly contemplating invoking his powers to dissolve the Parliament, which on Friday rejected his amendments to a law setting rules for parliamentary elections, now anticipated for October.
NEWS
June 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Lech Walesa vetoed a law drafted for Poland's first fully democratic parliamentary election. He exercised the presidential right of veto despite a warning from Mikolaj Kozakiewicz, Speaker of the Sejm (lower house), that such a move would make it impossible for the election to be held in October as planned.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Polish economic reform program, hailed by Western lenders, governments and financial institutions, is beginning to run into heavy political weather. With parliamentary elections scheduled for October, political operatives who see bankruptcies and factory closings looming in the coming months have taken aim at the economic reform plan guided by Leszek Balcerowicz, the finance minister.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1991 | GRETA BEIGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly half a century, the remains of Ignace Jan Paderewski, renowned pianist, composer and beloved Polish statesman, have rested in a zinc casket at the base of the mast of the USS Maine memorial at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. If all had gone according to plan, his remains would have been transferred to Poland for a state burial June 29, the 50th anniversary of his death. A celebratory concert in Warsaw with some of the biggest names in music was scheduled.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Defeated presidential candidate Stanislaw Tyminski said he has received permission to leave Poland. He said he plans to return temporarily to his family in Canada. Tyminski, who had been ordered to remain in the country pending investigation of slander charges stemming from the campaign, said he was required to post a $100,000 bond before he could leave. Meanwhile, the outgoing president, Gen.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Lech Walesa savored his presidential election victory with a visit to his old workplace in the Gdansk shipyards, Polish prosecutors announced Monday that Walesa's opponent, Stanislaw Tyminski, will be barred from leaving the country while an investigation continues into charges that he slandered the government. Tyminski, a 42-year-old who holds citizenship in Canada, Peru and Poland, could not be reached Monday, and his campaign offices were closed.
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