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Police Abuse

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WORLD
September 26, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Two police officers in Kazan, Russia, were sentenced to less than three years in prison Tuesday after the first convictions in a high-profile case that involved the illegal detention and death of a resident. Human rights activists complained that the sentences were too short to discourage abuses by police. Officers Ilshat Garifullin and Ramil Nigmatzyanov received sentences of 2 1/2 and two years, respectively, for exceeding their authority after the court determined that they illegally arrested Sergei Nazarov on March 9. Investigators allege that on the night of the arrest, Nazarov, 52, was beaten and sexually assaulted by colleagues of the two officers.
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WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Vincent Bevins
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- The mysterious death of a young dancer during a police operation led to violent clashes between slum residents and police in Rio de Janeiro on Tuesday night that left one man dead. Residents set fires and put up barricades, shutting down parts of the Copacabana and Ipanema neighborhoods into the night. One 30-year-old man died, reportedly shot in the head, and a 12-year old boy was injured. The incident was the latest in which the efforts of Rio's often-criticized Military Police to occupy and "pacify" Rio's hundreds of favelas, or slums, have been set back amid resurgent violence, pushback from communities and accusations of human rights abuses.
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NATIONAL
November 29, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
New Mexico lawyer Arlon Stoker calls the case the most obvious example of mistaken identity, color blindness or just plain meanness, and most likely all of the above. Stoker has filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Albuquerque on behalf of an elderly Native American couple and their three grandchildren who were pulled over at gunpoint in March by six New Mexico law enforcement officers searching for a car thief. The stop took place near the small community of Farmington. The driver, William Mike, who is 67 and suffers from chronic kidney disease and diabetes, was ordered to kneel on the cold, wet pavement while he was handcuffed, according to the suit.
OPINION
December 6, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Under fire for its controversial stop-and-frisk policy - which a federal judge has declared racially discriminatory and a violation of the 4th and 14th amendments - New York City has turned to a familiar face to lead the nation's largest police force: William J. Bratton. Bratton garnered national attention for a dramatic drop in crime while he was New York's police commissioner in the 1990s. But his subsequent tenure as chief of the Los Angeles Police Department cemented his reputation as a reformer.
OPINION
February 28, 2002
After reading "L.A. Settles 7 Rampart Cases for $2.8 Million" (Feb. 20), it's evident that police framing scandals are still a big-time problem in this nation. Just this one Rampart Division has cost taxpayers $35 million. I'd love to see an article on the burden put on taxpayers for this type of police abuse on a nationwide basis. It must be staggering. Wendell Taylor Rancho Santa Margarita
OPINION
May 15, 2004
Re "Lawsuit From Protest in 2000 Settled," May 8: The L.A. City Treasury is $4.1 million poorer because the actions of the police were indefensible. Consider that as a result of these actions: Innocent people suffered permanent injuries; law-abiding citizens were jailed; peaceful people were terrified to actually exercise their constitutional rights. Cynthia Hart Culver City
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2000
The problem with police in this country today goes far beyond the Rampart scandal. Throughout this country the beating and pepper-spraying of peaceful protesters, the shooting of homeless people and planting drugs on suspects seem to have become the accepted way of dealing with the public. Maybe requiring all police officers to have a college degree would create some hope of changing the police culture in this country. Moreover, if the Supreme Court continues to give police more authority, such as the disintegration of our 4th Amendment right (search and seizure)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Testimony in the Donovan Jackson police abuse trial is scheduled to resume Monday after a juror's illness forced the postponement of Friday's session. John Barnett, the defense attorney for former Inglewood Police Officer Jeremy Morse, is expected to call the final witnesses on Monday. Morse, who is charged with assault under color of authority, may testify in his own defense. The jury may begin deliberations by midweek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1991
Jurors in the trial of two Long Beach officers accused of police abuse spent Tuesday watching videos of the nationally publicized confrontation involving black activist Don Jackson, who is expected to testify today. Jurors watched five videos of the Jan. 14, 1989, confrontation in which Officer Mark Dickey appears to push Jackson into a glass window, shattering it. Jackson, a former Hawthorne police sergeant, arrived in Long Beach that night to conduct a "sting" on the city's Police Department.
WORLD
November 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The United Nations Committee Against Torture expressed concern Friday about alleged police abuse in Mexico, particularly "the indiscriminate use of arbitrary detentions" against some protesters. A committee report cites several police crackdowns on protests from 2004 to 2006 in which officers allegedly sexually abused demonstrators and beat others. There was no immediate comment from the government.
WORLD
July 25, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
RIO DE JANEIRO - When Pope Francis' first trip to his native Latin America takes him into a Rio de Janeiro slum on Thursday, he will be walking into an intersection of all the major social problems that have beset Brazil's economic rise - and that exploded into huge protests across the country last month. Almost a year after the tiny Varghina favela , or slum, was "pacified" - retaken from drug gangs by the government - residents complain of police abuse and say the authorities' arrival has not been accompanied by basic improvements in public services such as healthcare, transportation and education.
OPINION
May 27, 2013 | Jim Newton
Although it was drowned out by the mayor's race, Los Angeles quietly marked a historic moment this month: On May 15, after 12 years of policing the city under the eye of a federal judge, the Los Angeles Police Department at last was allowed to return to managing itself. That marks the end of a contentious yet intensely productive era, and it is a signal triumph for the man most responsible, Gerald Chaleff, who negotiated the consent decree in 2001, who oversaw its implementation and who witnessed its expiration.
WORLD
May 24, 2013 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - The streets of Stockholm were quieter late Friday after five consecutive nights of rioting that rocked the Swedish capital and shook the Scandinavian country's self-image as a tolerant, liberal place. Since Sunday, sections of northwest and south Stockholm have been lighted up with the glow of fires started by rock-throwing rioters, apparently protesting a fatal shooting by police last week. Schools, shops, a library and about 150 vehicles were set ablaze during the nightly rampages, which some commentators say are rooted in feelings of despair and disenfranchisement among the city's poor and its growing immigrant population.
WORLD
May 24, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- Residents of Stockholm braced for more violence Friday after five consecutive nights of rioting that have rocked the Swedish capital and shaken the Scandinavian country's self-image as a tolerant, liberal place. Since Sunday, sections of northwestern and southern Stockholm have lighted up with the glow of fires started by rock-throwing rioters apparently protesting a fatal shooting by police last week. Schools, shops, a library and about 150 vehicles have been set ablaze during the nightly rampages, which some commentators say are rooted in feelings of despair and disenfranchisement among the city's poor and its growing immigrant population.
WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- Same-sex marriage is legal in this city. Gay and lesbian couples can adopt children, and the government touts tolerance and respect for "sexual diversity" in messages posted on subway platforms and bus billboards. Yet, according to Jonathan Zamora, a 31-year-old psychologist, the advancement of gay rights in Mexico's capital in recent years conceals an ugly, persistent problem: unchecked discrimination and violence in what is, on paper at least, one of the most gay-friendly cities in the world.
WORLD
January 24, 2013 | By Reem Abdellatif
CAIRO - An Egyptian human rights groups reported this week that torture and police brutality, which helped spark a national uprising two years ago, have continued under the new Islamist-led government. Over the course of 2011 and 2012, the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR) documented more than 20 extrajudicial killings as a result of torture or "unnecessary" use of firearms by police forces, the group said in a report released ahead of the second anniversary of the Jan. 25 revolt that eventually toppled former President Hosni Mubarak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
The California Legislative Black Caucus plans to hold statewide hearings on police abuse, a state senator and an assemblyman said at a town hall meeting in Leimert Park on Saturday. The event was organized by the Community Commission on Police Abuse, a coalition of activists assembled by publisher and community leader Danny Bakewell after the June 23 televised beating of Stanley Miller, who was tackled by officers after being pursued in a stolen car.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1995
A jury that includes two Latinos and two African Americans was impaneled Thursday for the trial of a police abuse lawsuit that a Latino teen-ager filed against a black officer from Compton. Felipe Soltero, whose July 29 beating by Michael Jackson was partially videotaped by a neighbor and was shown to national and local TV audiences, says he was the victim of excessive force.
NATIONAL
November 29, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
New Mexico lawyer Arlon Stoker calls the case the most obvious example of mistaken identity, color blindness or just plain meanness, and most likely all of the above. Stoker has filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Albuquerque on behalf of an elderly Native American couple and their three grandchildren who were pulled over at gunpoint in March by six New Mexico law enforcement officers searching for a car thief. The stop took place near the small community of Farmington. The driver, William Mike, who is 67 and suffers from chronic kidney disease and diabetes, was ordered to kneel on the cold, wet pavement while he was handcuffed, according to the suit.
WORLD
November 2, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Activist Angy Peter, who has spent years exposing police failures in the sprawling township of Khayelitsha outside Cape Town, was due to testify at an upcoming commission of inquiry. Instead, she is behind bars, charged with killing a petty thief and police informer, Rowan du Preez, who supporters say Peter once saved from an angry mob that had accused him of theft. The timing of Peter's arrest and the homicide allegation are both suspicious, say fellow activists from Cape Town's Social Justice Coalition.
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