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Police Brutality Los Angeles

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NEWS
October 15, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three have been fired and 10 have quit. Nine have been promoted. Two have killed suspects while on duty. And one stands accused of falsifying evidence in a murder case. For most of the 44 Los Angeles Police Department officers labeled "problem officers" in the landmark 1991 Christopher Commission report, the past four years have been tumultuous. The commission said its intention was to illustrate, not define, what it called "the problem of excessive force in the LAPD."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2001 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no denying Sanford Diamond can be excitable. High blood pressure can do that to you, he says. So can the frustration of trying to communicate with a world you cannot hear. But even after the deaf and diabetic 72-year-old was handcuffed, brought to the ground, allegedly roughed up and finally cut loose by Los Angeles police, all he really wanted from the city was an apology and $5,850 for a new set of teeth, he says.
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BUSINESS
May 2, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks now, Tony Everfield has been planning a June vacation with his three children to Disneyland. But after watching two nights of rioting across Los Angeles on the television, Everfield was racked Friday by second thoughts. "I don't want my kids involved in seeing the violence," said the Oakland chef. "Los Angeles was a beautiful city. It just looks awful from what I've seen on the news. It will frighten the hell out of you.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2000 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The participants in Sunday's violent confrontation between police and protesters outside Parker Center clashed again Monday, as both sides accused the other of violence and hair-trigger reactions to provocation. Although the Los Angeles Police Department declined to make official comment pending a complete review of the incident, some officers defended their use of batons and rubber projectiles against demonstrators who, according to the LAPD, taunted, defied and pelted officers with debris.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Officer Henry J. Cousine--a police ring on his finger, an LAPD tattoo on his leg and battle scars on his body--says the officers accused of beating Rodney G. King swung their batons like "little girls." Then he ticks off some of his own episodes of violence during a decade as a beat cop: three fights and three shootings. "You get in my face, I'm going to fight back," Cousine said. "You swing at me, I'm going to knock you off your feet. And you pull a gun, I'll kill you."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even Hank Cousine admits that he's not the sort of fellow you would expect to find suing the Los Angeles Police Department for excessive force. On the other hand, having been labeled as one of the department's 44 "problem" officers by the Christopher Commission several years ago, perhaps he is something of an expert on the topic. "I've never been on this side of the table before," Cousine said in an interview this week, noting the irony in his status as victim and plaintiff.
NEWS
May 2, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of a flaming mini-mall near the corner of 5th and Western, behind a barricade of luxury sedans and battered grocery trucks, they built Firebase Koreatown. Richard Rhee, owner of the supermarket on the corner, had watched as roving bands of looters ransacked and burned Korean-owned businesses on virtually every block. But here, it would be different. "Burn this down after 33 years?"
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As soon as the black-and-white images of what he calls the "infamous incident" flashed across the nation's television screens, Daryl Francis Gates was back on familiar turf. Many times in his turbulent 13-year reign as Los Angeles police chief he has been on the defensive: the "normal people" controversy, the "Aryan broad" gaffe, the "El Salvadoran drunk" furor, the casual drug users "ought to be taken out and shot" uproar. This time, the stakes are higher.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Los Angeles police officers indicted in the Rodney G. King case have told department investigators that they feared for their lives during the beating of the motorist and were ready to shoot him if necessary. The officers' first detailed account of their actions is contained in a comprehensive 314-page Los Angeles Police Department Internal Affairs report on the incident, obtained Monday by The Times.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | DAVID SAVAGE and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling that sends the Rodney G. King police beating case back to Los Angeles for at least one more hearing, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously found Thursday that King's "misconduct" and the burden of a double trial justified the lenient, 30-month sentences imposed on two officers found guilty of violating his civil rights.
NEWS
February 14, 2000 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Anti-gang officers in the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart Division routinely and unnecessarily punched, kicked, choked and otherwise beat suspects in an effort to intimidate the gangs that the officers were charged with policing, according to confidential investigative documents and interviews.
NEWS
October 20, 1999 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ and RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Long before the current scandal erupted in the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart Division, top commanders had clear warnings that some of their elite, anti-gang officers lacked adequate supervision and were engaged in serious misconduct, including wrongly beating suspects and filing false reports.
NEWS
September 18, 1999 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal authorities said Friday that their civil rights investigation into the expanding Los Angeles Police Department corruption scandal is also focusing on the February 1998 beating of a handcuffed suspect held inside the Rampart station. Brian Hewitt, 34, the officer who allegedly beat the young man, was also involved in one of the station's controversial shootings, which left one man dead and two wounded. Hewitt fired seven of the 10 rounds discharged during the July 1996 incident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1998 | JOSEPH TREVINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than a thousand black-clad demonstrators marched through the Civic Center on Thursday as part of a national protest against police brutality, creating a massive downtown traffic jam. Led by a truck covered with pictures of people said to have died in confrontations with police, the eclectic group walked up Broadway from Olympic Boulevard to Temple Street, then east to the Los Angeles Police Department's Parker Center headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preempting a forthcoming report by the Los Angeles Police Commission's inspector general, Chief Bernard C. Parks on Tuesday released his own findings on officer use-of-force issues. Both the chief and the inspector general have found that use-of-force incidents at the LAPD--from shootings to physical encounters--have dropped over the last five years despite a significant increase in the number of officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1998 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR and SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Federal Bureau of Investigation has begun investigating the case of a Twin Towers Correctional Facility inmate, Danny Smith, who the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department admitted Tuesday was handcuffed during the altercation with deputies that ended with his death. That admission directly contradicts the department's previous account of the Aug. 1 death. The sheriff's initial news release said the incident began after deputies removed Smith's handcuffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1991 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Volker's mission was to find a fleeing gang member who had taken part in a pre-dawn shooting in Hollywood and slipped away. But when Volker, a German shepherd in the Los Angeles Police Department's K-9 unit, emerged from a nearby toolshed, his jaws were locked around the arm of someone other than the gunman. Hortencio Torres, 25, had been living in the shed, and he had nothing to do with the 1988 shooting incident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1992 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-seven of 44 Los Angeles police officers identified as "problem officers" by the Christopher Commission have received counseling and retraining, according to a report to be submitted next week to the Police Commission. The remainder of the officers were either fired or resigned from the force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of civil rights advocates on Tuesday pressed the Los Angeles Police Commission to establish an independent commission to investigate their claims that police selectively enforce laws to harass gay men and women. According to several speakers, LAPD officers target gays, their businesses and their communities with undercover operations aimed at citing people for lewd conduct and other offenses. "There is a widely and strongly held view . . .
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