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Police Corruption Mexico

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NEWS
December 16, 1996 | GEOFF BOUCHER and DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the trail of two suspected killers, Anaheim Det. Charlie Chavez arrived in Mexico in 1985 with names, addresses and a stack of evidence to prove his case. Police in two cities politely took the paperwork and told Chavez to wait for them to make an arrest. Eleven years later, Chavez and other Anaheim investigators are still waiting. Chavez's ordeal is an extreme example of a familiar frustration for Orange County police who often see their suspects evade or stall American justice.
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NEWS
December 15, 2001 | Associated Press
The former director of the federal highway police--who allegedly collaborated with a major drug cartel--was sentenced to more than four years in prison on charges of illegal arms possession, the attorney general's office said Friday. Enrique Harari was convicted of possessing 21 weapons permitted only for the military. They were found in his home in Ensenada in Baja California.
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NEWS
January 7, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican federal police and army agents seized three Lear jets, thousands of dollars in cash and more than two dozen suspected drug traffickers--including uniformed police officers--in a major blow to Mexico's most powerful drug cartel, authorities said Monday. The Mexican attorney general's office said it linked the jets and the 25 detained pilots, passengers and police officers--some of whom are federal agents--to the Juarez drug-trafficking cartel.
NEWS
June 23, 2000 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican authorities have arrested four of their own agents suspected of working for the powerful Arellano Felix drug gang. The Mexican federal attorney general's office said in a statement that the four federal agents, part of an anti-drug force in Tijuana since November, were charged with organized crime. The attorney general's statement said charges stemmed from "the relationship they had with the Arellano Felix brothers' criminal organization, through Ismael Higuera Guerrero."
NEWS
June 21, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A hit team fleeing the Guadalajara airport after killing a Roman Catholic cardinal and six other people last month handed off their automatic weapons to a cohort in waiting--a federal police officer hired to stash the guns in his car. A federal investigation of the assault quickly led officials to arrest the Jalisco state police chief, charging that he was on the payroll of the drug barons who had meant to kill rival trafficker Joaquin (El Chapo) Guzman.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Six Mexican police officers have been arrested on corruption charges as part of the investigation of last month's slaying of a Roman Catholic cardinal in Guadalajara, officials said in Mexico City. One of the officers, Lt. Col. Francisco Bejos Camacho, was the head of the Judicial Police in the state of Jalisco, of which Guadalajara is the capital.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate said Tuesday that Mexico's law enforcement Establishment appears to be infected by "massive corruption," as evidenced by a scandal involving Mario Ruiz Massieu, that nation's former top anti-drug official. While harshly criticizing the system itself, U.S. Magistrate Ronald Hedges made no immediate ruling on the Mexican government's request for extradition of Ruiz Massieu, held in U.S.
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's top law enforcement official on Wednesday ordered a "deep purge" and restructuring of the nation's federal police and prosecutors, targeting corruption, inefficiency and his agency's links to powerful drug cartels. Atty. Gen. Antonio Lozano indicated that the sweeping restructuring plan is a key step toward curbing abuses by some federal prosecutors and police commanders, who have run virtual fiefdoms in the Mexican countryside with unchallenged power.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigations into the assassination of a former western state attorney general and a highly publicized confrontation between law enforcement agencies over a northern Mexico cocaine shipment have provided increasing evidence of the depth of police involvement in this nation's drug trade.
NEWS
May 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Some of Mexico's biggest anti-drug operations were the brainchild of a Mexican drug lord who used the military to fight rival dealers, it was reported today. The report, based on testimony military officers gave during court proceedings in Mexico City, called into question efforts by the U.S. and Mexican governments to rely on the Mexican military in their war on drugs. The testimony was part of the case against Gen.
NEWS
August 3, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a corruption problem so serious that you don't trust your traffic cops to give out tickets. Mexico City Police Chief Alejandro Gertz faced a public outcry over exactly that dilemma. So on Monday, he took away the citation books from the city's 900 traffic officers. Instead, Gertz authorized just 30 police cars--each staffed by two policewomen, who are deemed less corruptible than their male counterparts--to issue traffic tickets.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To U.S. tourists and well-heeled Mexicans, this resort city is a haven of sunny weather, elegant restaurants and riotous gardens of purple and magenta bougainvillea. But in recent years, Cuernavaca has become a haven of a more sinister sort. Kidnappers have sown terror in the city and region, abducting hundreds of people. Drug lords have moved into the walled mansions of the "city of eternal spring." Authorities seemed helpless in the face of chaos. Now Mexicans are learning why.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1997 | LORENZA MUNOZ and SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Investigators in Mexico said Thursday that they have arrested seven people, including three Tijuana police officers, in connection with the kidnapping and killing of two Santa Ana men. The victims' bodies were discovered Wednesday buried under the concrete floor of a Tijuana auto body shop. Both men had been shot in the head, said Fausto Gonzalez, an investigator with the San Diego Police Department. The victims were identified as Juan Jose Solorzano and Jose Ramon Santillan.
NEWS
May 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Some of Mexico's biggest anti-drug operations were the brainchild of a Mexican drug lord who used the military to fight rival dealers, it was reported today. The report, based on testimony military officers gave during court proceedings in Mexico City, called into question efforts by the U.S. and Mexican governments to rely on the Mexican military in their war on drugs. The testimony was part of the case against Gen.
NEWS
May 14, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Seven former members of Mexico's anti-drug forces who were also allegedly on reputed cocaine baron Amado Carrillo Fuentes' payroll have been arrested, officials said. The arrests were made after two men tried to bribe the head of an army border post in the southeastern state of Campeche to allow a plane carrying illegal drugs to land safely, officials said.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
New mandatory drug tests for Mexico's federal law enforcement agencies turned up 424 police, prosecutors and administrative personnel who tested positive--nearly half of them for cocaine use--during the past six weeks, the attorney general's office disclosed here Tuesday.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Ernesto Zedillo named a tough army general to head this city's civilian Police Department last year, senior officials termed the move a temporary one to crack down on crime and police corruption. Six months later, when Zedillo appointed another active-duty army general to the nation's top counter-narcotics post, officials again called the measure temporary and said it was made to instill discipline and integrity in the ranks of Mexico's notoriously corrupt federal police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With record numbers of Mexican immigrants expected to return to their homeland for holiday visits, three high-level officials from Mexico City have pledged a crackdown on extortion and other abuses long common among Mexican authorities posted at borders, airports and roads. "We want our compatriots to know that they are welcome," Fernando Solis Camara, Mexico's immigration chief, told a news conference Thursday at the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Ernesto Zedillo named a tough army general to head this city's civilian Police Department last year, senior officials termed the move a temporary one to crack down on crime and police corruption. Six months later, when Zedillo appointed another active-duty army general to the nation's top counter-narcotics post, officials again called the measure temporary and said it was made to instill discipline and integrity in the ranks of Mexico's notoriously corrupt federal police.
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