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Police Dogs

NEWS
November 13, 1986
The City Council Monday approved a law exempting police dogs from city license fees and leash requirements. It also exempted dogs that live in the city but are used by outside law enforcement agencies. Under the municipal code, dog owners are required to pay a $17 annual license fee and keep their pets on a six-foot leash and are prohibited from taking the animals to parks or inside stores and restaurants. Police said the rules hindered their pursuit and apprehension of criminals.
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NEWS
June 27, 1999 | Reuters
Fearless police dogs in Florida are dressing for danger in bulletproof vests made of the same Kevlar armor that their handlers wear. "We really don't want to lose any of our dogs," Deanna Brown, spokeswoman for the Seminole County Sheriff's Department in central Florida, said Friday. The department fitted its four German shepherd dogs with the vests this week.
NEWS
July 24, 1988
The brutality of using vicious dogs to corner and control humans was brought home to me in the article, "Man Attacked by Police Dog Says He'll Sue" by Bettina Boxall (Times, July 7). The incident is reminiscent of the 1960s when black Americans were subjected to dog attacks as they marched in protest in the South against the brutal policies of racism and segregation in America. I always considered the use of police dogs as inhumane no matter who the victims are. I hope that Southern Californians will speak out against such brutality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1995 | From Associated Press
Two men who say they were victims of excessive force when they were pursued and bitten by Orange County police dogs lost an appeal to the state Supreme Court. The court Monday let stand rulings that threw out the civil rights lawsuits against Santa Ana, Costa Mesa and their city police departments. Lawyers for Thomas Shannon and Craig Brooks had argued police should not be shielded from being sued if they "knowingly use weapons--police dogs--to injure people" unnecessarily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1996 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allowing police dogs to sniff student lockers for drugs does not violate students' constitutional rights, according to a legal opinion requested by the Simi Valley Unified School District. The district is scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to bring 10 officers and their dogs on campus while students are in class to sniff lockers for drugs. The exercise would serve as training for the county's canine units and as a deterrent to students who would bring drugs to school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1990 | TOM MC QUEENEY
Police dogs helped arrest a 23-year-old man and a 16-year-old Anaheim youth early Tuesday morning after they allegedly tried to run over two Anaheim police officers investigating a possible auto burglary. Arrested were Paul Anthony Koudssi, who told police he has no home, and the teen-ager, whom police did not identify because of his age. They were found hiding under a truck in the rear parking lot of a plumbing business on Brookhurst Street north of Lincoln Avenue, Lt. Marc Hedgpeth said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1990
A Santa Ana police officer was bitten by another department's police dog during a routine arrest Monday night, authorities said. The incident occurred about 9 p.m. after an Orange police officer spotted a stolen vehicle and followed it into Santa Ana, according to Orange Police Sgt. Ed Falkenstien. Santa Ana officers joined the pursuit of the vehicle and arrested the unidentified driver at the intersection of Main and 18th streets.
NEWS
July 12, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
One of the most liberal judges of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and a leading conservative colleague have clashed in an unusually personal exchange of insults over questions of privacy, police dogs and judicial philosophy. The rare legal quarrel between the two federal judges was triggered by a dispute over whether there is an urgent need to decide if police dogs can be used in searches of private homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
A double funeral will be held Thursday for Rocco and Axel, two dogs who worked for the Long Beach Police Department until they died the same week. The public is invited to the 3 p.m. service, complete with pastoral remarks, taps and a 21-gun salute, at the Long Beach Police Academy, 7290 E. Carson St. Rocco, a 2 1/2-year-old Dutch shepherd, was checking for a burglar on the roof of the Museum of Latin American Art when he jumped onto an aluminum awning that collapsed.
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