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September 19, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the image of Guatemala as a massive violator of human rights has drawn world attention in recent years, almost as troubling is the nation's growing corruption, an infestation of special privilege that has reached to the top of the armed forces and into the highest ranks of government. The most important question facing President Jorge Serrano "is how much he is interested in fighting corruption," said Gen. Hector Gramajo, the retired minister of defense and former army chief of staff.
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NEWS
September 19, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the image of Guatemala as a massive violator of human rights has drawn world attention in recent years, almost as troubling is the nation's growing corruption, an infestation of special privilege that has reached to the top of the armed forces and into the highest ranks of government. The most important question facing President Jorge Serrano "is how much he is interested in fighting corruption," said Gen. Hector Gramajo, the retired minister of defense and former army chief of staff.
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NEWS
September 19, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It never seems to end. Day after day, year after year, Guatemala is awash in murder, torture, kidnaping and fear, whether the government is in the hands of power-grabbing generals or elected civilians. The statistics are appalling. As of the end of August, at least 548 people had been killed this year in political violence and 114 others had been kidnaped. Another 124 people had been attacked, tortured or threatened for political reasons.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It never seems to end. Day after day, year after year, Guatemala is awash in murder, torture, kidnaping and fear, whether the government is in the hands of power-grabbing generals or elected civilians. The statistics are appalling. As of the end of August, at least 548 people had been killed this year in political violence and 114 others had been kidnaped. Another 124 people had been attacked, tortured or threatened for political reasons.
WORLD
December 2, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Mexican and Guatemalan drug traffickers arguing about bets on a horse race in a rural border town fought a series of gun battles in which 17 people died, police said. Guatemala's National Police spokesman, Donald Gonzalez, said the traffickers were drinking in Santa Ana Huista on Sunday afternoon when the argument broke out, leading to a pursuit in which the men shot at one another with automatic weapons from racing trucks. Gonzalez said police found grenade launchers at the scene of the final shootout, along with hundreds of bullet cartridges and a truck with license plates from the Mexican state of Tamaulipas.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guatemalan authorities are investigating whether escaped Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman Loera is behind recent assassination attempts on the family of a retired Guatemalan general. Police in Guatemala believe that "El Chapo" may be hiding there and are investigating whether he ordered revenge hits Wednesday on the daughter and wife of retired Gen. Otto Perez Molina, the Reforma paper reported. The daughter was wounded and the wife unharmed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1985
President Reagan's plan to pour large amounts of money into Central American police agencies is a serious mistake, typical of the shortsighted view that shapes Administration strategy for the region. The aid plan, as outlined by Times correspondent Doyle McManus, would provide $53 million worth of equipment and training to police forces in Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Costa Rica.
TRAVEL
April 23, 1995 | EDWARD WRIGHT, Wright is a former assistant foreign editor at The Times. His column appears monthly.
Latin America Mexico: Several U.S. Embassy employees have been abducted, assaulted and robbed after hailing taxicabs in the streets of Mexico City, and the embassy now advises its staff to use only taxis at authorized taxi stands, known as sitios, at the airport and throughout the capital. For the locations of those stands, travelers may consult their hotels, and the embassy can provide further information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2010 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Reporting from Caserio Xexac, Guatemala
It was just before 11 a.m. when Isabel Marroquin Tambriz once more began to cry. Her wails were so piercing they rose above the brass band. They traveled down the dirt paths of the village, which grew ever more crowded with mourners. "Walijoq caewaj!" she yelled over and over in Quiche. Wake up, my love. Wake up, my love. In a casket outside her cinder-block home lay the body of her husband, Manuel Jaminez Xum. He was dressed in a pinstripe three-piece suit, finer than anything he'd worn when he was alive.
WORLD
February 21, 2007 | Hector Tobar and Alex Renderos, Special to The Times
Three Salvadoran legislators, including a scion of one of the country's leading right-wing families, were kidnapped and slain and their bodies set ablaze during a trip to neighboring Guatemala, officials said Tuesday. The congressional deputies were members of the ruling right-wing Nationalist Republican Alliance. They were killed Monday night along with their driver as they paid an official visit to Guatemala City. Their charred bodies and gutted vehicle were found on a farm outside the city.
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