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October 4, 1992 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Officer Henry J. Cousine--a police ring on his finger, an LAPD tattoo on his leg and battle scars on his body--says the officers accused of beating Rodney G. King swung their batons like "little girls." Then he ticks off some of his own episodes of violence during a decade as a beat cop: three fights and three shootings. "You get in my face, I'm going to fight back," Cousine said. "You swing at me, I'm going to knock you off your feet. And you pull a gun, I'll kill you."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | Steve Lopez
In Los Angeles, patrol officers are caught disabling recording equipment that was in place to keep them honest. In Santa Monica, a high school student demonstrates why the wrestling coach is the last faculty member to mess with. And in Glendale, a young woman challenges the definition of "hands-free" driving after getting a ticket for talking on a phone tucked into her head scarf. These three police blotter tales have little in common, except that I've assembled them in a nice spring bouquet, along with a prickly observation or two. First the LAPD.
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NEWS
December 24, 2000 | MAURA DOLAN and MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Only rarely does a judge in a criminal case overturn the verdict reached by jurors in her own courtroom. Still rarer is the judge who admits to committing an error so serious it taints a verdict. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Jacqueline Connor did both Friday night in an extraordinary ruling that overturned the convictions of three Rampart Division police officers, impressing legal scholars with both her tightly reasoned legal arguments and her unusual candor.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A robbery suspect in Albuquerque appears to toss his gun into the air while fleeing a police officer who shot at him eight times from behind, newly released video shows. Four of the shots are heard after the gun is in the air. The video, which includes audio, was captured in October by the officer's lapel-mounted camera. The case of robbery suspect Joaquin Ortega, 35, is one of the most recent controversies surrounding the Albuquerque Police Department's use of force. The city has paid out millions of dollars in lawsuits related to alleged police misconduct in recent years.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | ROBERT A. JONES
I remember the show ran on Monday nights and I remember my father loved it. He was the family's biggest fan of "Dragnet." My mother refused to watch, probably on religious grounds, but the rest of us did, every week. "Dragnet" was part of our routine. That took place in Memphis, Tenn., 1953 or '54. We had one of the first TV sets on the block and "Dragnet" was our introduction to California. We saw palm trees growing out of the sidewalks and crooks wearing Hawaiian shirts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998 | JIM NEWTON and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Just beneath the surface of Los Angeles' charter reform debate, a historic struggle for power is being waged inside the LAPD, with the department's chief trying to solidify his authority and the city's police union taking what once would have been considered desperate measures to resist. According to documents submitted to the city's two charter commissions and interviews with many of the principals, Police Chief Bernard C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1999
"An Old Rap Sheet" (editorial, May 6), criticizing the timing of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission report concerning police abuse in L.A. County, is unwarranted. Yes, the commission took a long time in issuing a report that recommends the same changes many of us have been seeking for years. If The Times questions the need for a "special prosecutor," perhaps it should use its own resources to investigate why so few police officers and deputies are prosecuted in L.A. County, compared to the number of civil rights police misconduct cases won each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2013 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey announced Tuesday that she has issued new policies on when to disclose information about police officer misconduct and other evidence in criminal cases to defense attorneys. The move drew praise from the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California, which, along with other civil rights lawyers, sued the county last year accusing prosecutors of improperly withholding key evidence from defendants. The new directives, issued last week, make it clear that prosecutors must disclose all evidence favorable to the defense and that they cannot rely solely on the contents of a district attorney's database that tracks police misconduct when they determine what evidence needs to be turned over.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
Citing their own statistics, several civil liberties groups charged Wednesday that police misconduct in the city and county of Los Angeles has reached "epidemic proportions" and called for formation of citizen review boards, appointment of special prosecutors and legislative hearings. Members of a coalition of civil and human rights organizations, including police activist Don Jackson, made the charges at a press conference in front of Parker Center. The Los Angeles Police Department quickly responded by saying there has been a decrease in complaints of excessive force filed with the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1988 | JOHN A. OSWALD, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles police officers who allegedly caused extensive damage to four Southwest Los Angeles apartments during a drug raid two weeks ago appear to be guilty of "some police misconduct," a police department spokesman said Friday. "The officers are trying to do something about gangs and drugs and I think in this case they got carried away," said Deputy Chief Bill Rathburn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
In the wake of two controversial police shootings, Anaheim is launching a pilot citizens review board that would help monitor the city's Police Department. The nine-member board, appointed by the city manager, will be selected using a lottery system with representatives coming from four neighborhood council areas. The panel will provide recommendations to city officials, issue annual reports and conduct community outreach, according to the staff report. City Manager Marcie Edwards said she expects to have board members in place by summer -- two years after residents took to the streets in protest after the fatal shootings of Manuel Diaz and Joel Acevedo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014 | By Richard Winton
An African American judge has filed a $10-million claim alleging excessive force and racial profiling by UCLA's campus police when he was handcuffed and put into a police cruiser after being stopped last fall for not wearing a seat belt. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge David Cunningham III, a former police commission president, alleges in the claim filed Jan. 16 that two UCLA Police Department officers, Kevin Dodd and James Kim, used unreasonable force and that their motivation was racial profiling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
A group of Los Angeles police officers Wednesday began wearing on-body cameras, the first step toward the LAPD's plan to outfit hundreds of officers with the recording devices. Over the next several months, 30 officers assigned to the downtown skid row area will test different camera models. At the end of the testing period, officials expect to purchase about 600 cameras for use throughout the LAPD. The push for the cameras has been led by the president of the Police Commission, Steve Soboroff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2013 | By Tina Susman and Joe Serna
NEW YORK -- New York City Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio named William J. Bratton to return as the city's police commissioner Thursday, selecting the former LAPD police chief to head a department praised for overseeing a drop in crime but criticized for its use of racially charged stop-and-frisk tactics. Bratton had been expected to get the job, which has been held since 2002 by Raymond Kelly. De Blasio, who will take office in January at the end of Michael Bloomberg's third and final term, was a harsh critic of Kelly and vowed to replace him if elected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | Richard Winton
UCLA is conducting an internal investigation into allegations by an African American judge that excessive force was used by campus police officers when they stopped him on suspicion of not wearing a seat belt. UCLA officials say David S. Cunningham III, a former Los Angeles Police Commission president, ignored officers' orders to stay in his car. Cunningham has filed a complaint against the officers, saying they shoved him against his car, handcuffed him and locked him in the back seat of their police cruiser.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Jack Leonard
A corruption-tackling prosecutor has been selected to head a new agency that will scrutinize the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, with the power to conduct investigations inside the troubled jails and elsewhere. After months of searching, the Board of Supervisors offered the job Tuesday to Deputy Dist. Atty. Max Huntsman, a supervisor in the district attorney's public corruption division who has been among the lead prosecutors in the trial of Bell city officials, according to county sources familiar with the decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Judges trying to decide whether to admit evidence of misconduct by police officers testifying in court are not entitled to see the officer's entire personnel file, just documents that police departments believe are relevant, the state Supreme Court has ruled. In a unanimous decision, the high court ruled Monday that Santa Ana police officials did nothing inappropriate when they gave a judge only a portion of a jail guard's personnel file before a trial that hinged on the officer's testimony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1996
Responding to a controversial arrest, a community group has opened a hotline and free legal clinic to help Korean-speaking victims of police mistreatment. Many monolingual immigrants do not publicly challenge police misconduct because it only means more frustration and humiliation, said K.S. Park, a staff attorney with Korean Immigrant Workers Advocates. The program, which began Thursday, was prompted by the arrest and detention of Korean immigrant Dong-Sik Chong, 81.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | By Richard Winton
An African American judge who has accused UCLA police of excessive force ignored officers' orders to stay in his car, UCLA officials said Monday. David S. Cunningham III, a former Los Angeles Police Commission president, filed a complaint against the officers after they allegedly shoved him against his car, handcuffed him and locked him in the back seat of their police cruiser. "During the course of the traffic stop, police officers instructed the driver to stay inside the vehicle and returned to their patrol car to run a routine license and registration check," UCLA said in a statement released late Monday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | By Richard Winton
Colleagues of Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge David S. Cunningham III, who has filed a complaint against UCLA police for excessive force, said they are shocked by the incident and don't believe the mild-mannered former police commissioner would have provoked authorities. “Calm and thoughtful are two words that come to mind with David,” said Andrea Ordin, a former U.S. attorney, Los Angeles County counsel and L.A. police commissioner. “I have known him as a judge, a lawyer and from his work with the police commission.
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