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Police Murders Texas

NEWS
March 4, 1993 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Law enforcement and tactical experts across the country on Wednesday expressed dismay over the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms' handling of a Sunday confrontation with a messianic cult that left four federal agents and at least two cult members dead.
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NEWS
March 4, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As messianic cult leader David Koresh and more than 100 followers awaited "instructions from God" before agreeing to surrender their armed prairie fortress, a well-supplied force of law enforcement officials laid groundwork Wednesday for a long siege, vowing not to risk another bloody assault on the compound. Two high-ranking federal officials acknowledged publicly that last Sunday's raid on the Branch Davidian complex near Waco, which left four U.S.
NEWS
March 3, 1993 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A heavily armed cult leader who has held federal agents at bay for three days promised to surrender himself and scores of followers Tuesday, but the time set for their capitulation came and went without any break in the increasingly tense standoff. Throughout the day, there were intimations of a pending end to the conflict between David Koresh, his followers and as many as 400 federal agents gathered at the cult's 77-acre compound 10 miles from Waco, in central Texas.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | STEPHEN BRAUN and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ringed by hundreds of armed law enforcement officials, machine-gun wielding members of a messianic religious sect released six children from their fortified compound Monday, but the concession did little to ease the state of siege that has set in since four federal agents and two cult members were killed in a chaotic firefight on Sunday.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal agents attempting to serve search warrants on a heavily armed religious camp near here early Sunday were ambushed by raging gunfire that left four of them dead and 15 others injured, several seriously. About 45 minutes after the automatic weapons fire began, a cease-fire was negotiated by surviving agents of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms and the cult's leader, a 33-year-old guitarist and ninth-grade dropout who is said to believe that he is Jesus Christ.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
For 50 years, the cult involved in a violent and bloody shootout Sunday with federal agents near Waco, Tex., has been preoccupied with the long-foretold catastrophic end of time--an awful day of reckoning when the wicked would be brought to judgment. But as federal agents stormed the cult's armed fortress on Sunday, it was the group's leader, David Koresh--a man who claims to be Jesus Christ--that agents of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms were attempting to bring to justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's hard to imagine a case with two antagonists more estranged than Linda Sue Davidson and Tupac Amaru Shakur. Davidson, a white middle-aged state trooper's wife, has spent the past 20 years raising her two children in this tiny Texas town where country music rules the airwaves and John Wayne's portrait hangs on the wall of the local cafe.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Popular music is back in the courtroom--on a murder charge. Six weeks after Time Warner Inc. and Ice-T pulled the controversial "Cop Killer" song off the market, an unprecedented legal battle over another album released by a Time Warner subsidiary promises to reopen the bitter national debate over artistic expression, free speech and corporate responsibility.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an extraordinary series of middle-of-the-night phone calls, the Supreme Court at the insistence of four justices agreed early last Wednesday to rule on whether the Constitution forbids the execution of a convicted murderer in Texas who may be innocent. But, at the same time, the high court turned down an appeal for a stay of execution of the man, whose lawyers say can be proved not guilty by new evidence.
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
The man whose wrongful conviction became a celebrated case because of a movie won his unconditional freedom Thursday, but not before a series of events that cast a pall on the Dallas justice system. All charges against Randall Dale Adams, convicted in 1976 of murdering a policeman, were dropped by Dallas Dist. Atty. John Vance, who said there was not enough evidence to justify a retrial.
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