Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPolice Protective League
IN THE NEWS

Police Protective League

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1996
The Los Angeles City Council and Mayor Richard Riordan officially approved a four-year contract for the city's police officers, giving them raises totaling 18% by 2000. The unanimous council vote and Riordan's signature simply formalize the contract that 94% of the police union's membership approved in June. The salary increases--5% for each of the first three years, and 3% the last year--are retroactive to July 1 (probationary officers get 1% less each year).
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2009 | Joel Rubin
Despite repeated legal defeats, the union representing Los Angeles police announced Friday it will pursue its fight against a policy that requires officers to disclose personal financial information. Since the policy was approved more than a year ago, the Police Protective League has worked aggressively to block its implementation. The union first filed a lawsuit against the police department and then sought a temporary injunction to prevent the Los Angeles Police Department from collecting the information until the lawsuit was decided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1987
I could not believe what I was reading in the article. One of the most amusing and disturbing statements was made by Frank Grimes of the Police Protective League when he said, "I think it's dangerous when you have members of this department in policy-making positions speaking in religious terms. . . ." I suppose he would rather hear their vulgar language. Mr. Grimes, the danger is not with the born-again Christians but with those officers who are murdering innocent people, stealing yachts and dealing in narcotics of which much has been in the paper recently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000
Re "Officer Believed He Was About to Be Shot," Commentary, Nov. 12: While it is Ted Hunt's and Mitzi Grasso's job to protect LAPD officers, their defense is misplaced. I do not dispute that an officer's job in the field is "laden with fear and doubt." But all human beings, especially those in law enforcement, observe their surroundings. This officer knew that this was a Halloween party at a million-dollar home, in a million-dollar neighborhood, with privately hired security on the grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1987
A Los Angeles police captain, accused of roughing up a female desk officer who tried to stop him from taking a card she had received in a bouquet of flowers, faces a Police Department board of inquiry, a police spokesman said Saturday. Police Chief Daryl F. Gates called for the board of inquiry, the Police Department's most serious review, for Capt. Jerry Conner, 49, commander of the 77th Street station in South Los Angeles, Cmdr. William Booth said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2008 | Joel Rubin
The Los Angeles Police Commission once again raised concerns Tuesday about a union fund that reimburses officers who are suspended without pay for misconduct. Members of the oversight body pressed Police Chief William J. Bratton and a member of the department's Internal Affairs Group for assurances that the policy doesn't undermine the LAPD's ability to discipline officers. Bratton acknowledged to commissioners that he could not provide any clear proof that officers take suspensions and conduct issues seriously, saying he and his staff were only offering a "subjective opinion" that the reimbursements were not a problem.
OPINION
February 15, 2002
Re "Teamsters Seeking to Represent the LAPD," Feb. 12: So the rank and file of the LAPD are considering having the Teamsters represent them. Let me understand this. They want to be represented by the same Teamsters Union once headed by the apparently late Jimmy Hoffa, who it seems has met a mob ending. The same Teamsters Union that was taken over by a federal supervisor in face of rampant internal corruption. The same Teamsters Union that has used mob-style enforcement and lead pipes in support of its "labor actions," and has destroyed the property of those who have had the temerity to cross its picket lines.
OPINION
April 12, 2002
The Los Angeles police union is like an overly critical partner who never has anything good to say. The Police Protective League doesn't like Chief Bernard C. Parks. It wants a divorce; Mayor James K. Hahn delivers. The union demands a three-day workweek of 12-hour days; the mayor makes sure some officers get it, over the opposition of the chief and common sense. So far during Hahn's mayoral tenure what the police union wants, it gets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2009 | David Zahniser
Even as Los Angeles police officers go without raises, the City Council moved ahead with a plan Friday to give employees of the Department of Water and Power pay increases ranging from 2% to 4% in each of the next five years. Three hours after it approved a two-year contract with the Police Protective League that offers no salary increases, the council forwarded the pay-raise package to members of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 18 for ratification. City Administrative Officer Miguel Santana, the top budget official, refused to comment on the agreement.
OPINION
April 12, 2002
Your coverage of Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard Parks' resolve to seek another term in office despite official opposition (April 10) presented a compelling portrait of a man of high character and uncompromising integrity. In the face of controversy from all quarters, he undeniably has the strength and courage to stand alone and work toward his vision of better law enforcement. And that is what we hired him to do. The ordeal of change is often painful, and it takes a remarkable individual to make it happen.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|