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December 24, 2000 | MAURA DOLAN and MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Only rarely does a judge in a criminal case overturn the verdict reached by jurors in her own courtroom. Still rarer is the judge who admits to committing an error so serious it taints a verdict. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Jacqueline Connor did both Friday night in an extraordinary ruling that overturned the convictions of three Rampart Division police officers, impressing legal scholars with both her tightly reasoned legal arguments and her unusual candor.
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NATIONAL
April 6, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
ALBUQUERQUE - When Wynema and Michael Gonzagowski moved to town about two years ago, family and friends warned them about what they described as the heavy-handed tactics and aggressive attitude of Albuquerque police. At first the couple brushed off the warnings, saying things couldn't be as bad as what they had experienced in Los Angeles in the LAPD's Rampart Division, which became infamous for corruption in its anti-gang unit in the 1990s. But the Gonzagowskis, like others here, began to grow suspicious of their Police Department.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2003 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
The San Bernardino man who allegedly shot a sheriff's deputy last week, and then stunned investigators by pulling out a handgun and killing himself in a Sheriff's Department interview room after his arrest, was facing a third-strike felony charge and a possible life sentence if convicted, authorities said Monday. San Bernardino County Sheriff Gary Penrod also said investigators found that the suspect, Ricardo Alfonso Cerna, 47, had two bullets in his .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
An Anaheim councilwoman is being asked to resign following her online remarks that the fatal police shooting of a 21-year-old man had "saved us a trial. " Lucille Kring, who is running for mayor in the resort city, quickly apologized for her comments, but some residents said it was too late and urged her to step down instead. The relationship between police and residents in the densely packed core of Orange County's largest city has been strained for years and came to a head in the summer of 2012 when a series of shootings ignited days of street protests and angry demonstrations.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
ALBUQUERQUE - When Wynema and Michael Gonzagowski moved to town about two years ago, family and friends warned them about what they described as the heavy-handed tactics and aggressive attitude of Albuquerque police. At first the couple brushed off the warnings, saying things couldn't be as bad as what they had experienced in Los Angeles in the LAPD's Rampart Division, which became infamous for corruption in its anti-gang unit in the 1990s. But the Gonzagowskis, like others here, began to grow suspicious of their Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1999
Re "Police Shootings," letter, April 13: I have been a police officer for over 10 years. It has never been the policy of either agency I have worked for to "shoot to kill." Leonard Burney asks the question, why do police shoot to kill, not shoot to wound. The conditions [during a shooting] are always less than ideal. The easiest part of a person to hit is also the part that could cause fatal injury. The mind-set is to reduce the threat, not to kill. Unfortunately, death sometimes occurs but, generally speaking, most of those who die put themselves in that position, not the police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2012 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Federal officials have agreed to look into a recent officer-involved shooting in Anaheim after a meeting with the mayor Friday. The U.S. Department of Justice and the FBI have agreed to conduct an independent review of the July 21 police shooting of Manuel Diaz, a 25-year-old documented gang member. The city will also provide federal authorities with information about other police shootings in Anaheim this year. So far, there have been six officer-involved shootings, five of them fatal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
In the wake of two controversial police shootings, Anaheim is launching a pilot citizens review board that would help monitor the city's Police Department. The nine-member board, appointed by the city manager, will be selected using a lottery system with representatives coming from four neighborhood council areas. The panel will provide recommendations to city officials, issue annual reports and conduct community outreach, according to the staff report. City Manager Marcie Edwards said she expects to have board members in place by summer -- two years after residents took to the streets in protest after the fatal shootings of Manuel Diaz and Joel Acevedo.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A robbery suspect in Albuquerque appears to toss his gun into the air while fleeing a police officer who shot at him eight times from behind, newly released video shows. Four of the shots are heard after the gun is in the air. The video, which includes audio, was captured in October by the officer's lapel-mounted camera. The case of robbery suspect Joaquin Ortega, 35, is one of the most recent controversies surrounding the Albuquerque Police Department's use of force. The city has paid out millions of dollars in lawsuits related to alleged police misconduct in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
In the wake of two controversial police shootings, Anaheim is launching a pilot citizens review board that would help monitor the city's Police Department. The nine-member board, appointed by the city manager, will be selected using a lottery system with representatives coming from four neighborhood council areas. The panel will provide recommendations to city officials, issue annual reports and conduct community outreach, according to the staff report. City Manager Marcie Edwards said she expects to have board members in place by summer -- two years after residents took to the streets in protest after the fatal shootings of Manuel Diaz and Joel Acevedo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday revised the way it evaluates police shootings, tying an officer's use of deadly force to his or her actions in the moments leading up to the incident. The unanimous decision by the civilian panel that oversees the Los Angeles Police Department was made to bring the department in line with current legal standards. It also is expected to clarify commission rules that in the past have led to confusion over how the panel evaluates some officers who fire their weapons or use other deadly force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
The Los Angeles Police Commission is poised to adopt a major shift in the way it judges police shootings, tying an officer's decision to pull the trigger to his actions in the moments leading up to the incident. The rule change, which will be taken up Tuesday, would settle years of debate over whether the commission can make a determination that a shooting violated department policy if the officer created a situation in which deadly force was necessary. Until now, the commission has generally focused on the narrow question of whether an officer faced a deadly threat at the moment he opened fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
A man who watched as his dog was shot and killed during a confrontation with Hawthorne police has filed a civil-rights suit against the city and three police officers. Leon Rosby alleges the June 2013 incident was part of a “pattern of harassing conduct” carried out by Hawthorne police after he complained about alleged corruption within the department. According to the suit, the officers' conduct was “directed at Mr. Rosby and was intended to intimidate and harm him and to cause psychological trauma” by forcing him to watch his dog being killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck has found that eight officers who opened fire on two women in a pickup truck during a search for Christopher Dorner violated the department's policy on using deadly force, according to multiple sources with knowledge of the case. Beck will meet Tuesday with the Police Commission, which oversees the LAPD and has the final word on police shootings, to share his finding. The commission will then vote on whether it agrees the officers violated LAPD policy.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
At least one young person was hurt after an officer-involved shooting at a high school in Honolulu on Tuesday morning, according to Honolulu police. A spokesman for the Honolulu Police Department told reporters three officers went to Roosevelt High School after a 17-year-old runaway showed up at the school. After police encountered the young man in a school office, he "became combative" and struck two of the officers, the spokesman said. The 17-year-old pulled out a knife and "began slashing" the officers, the spokesman said.
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