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Police State

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1998 | GIDEON KANNER, Gideon Kanner is professor of law emeritus at Loyola Law School, where for the past 20 years he has taught property and land-use law
Basic legal doctrine has it that the state police power is the inherent regulatory power of government to do what is reasonably necessary to promote public health, safety, welfare and morals. That sounds pretty good until you recall Lord Acton's admonition that power tends to corrupt. That it does. Case in point: Glendale's harassment of Daniel and Melanie Trevor for--are you ready?
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NEWS
January 1, 1998 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Nicole Eklund, a 16-year-old cheerleader from Simi Valley, coming of age has meant getting used to police dogs sniffing for drugs at her school locker, dress codes proscribing bare midriffs, and an official 10 p.m. curfew seven days a week. Leaders in her community--a suburb so benign she calls it "Anytown, USA"--have expelled a kindergartner for bringing a pink squirt gun to school and are considering, as state legislators plan to, a daytime curfew for people under age 18.
NEWS
December 17, 1997 | BONNIE HAYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to keep repeat offenders out of problem areas in the city, Anaheim police and state parole officials have declared three public parks off-limits to all parolees with drug-related convictions. The policy, similar to those enforced by two other California cities, prohibits the parolees from being in Pearson, La Palma or Twila Reid parks or around any businesses nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1997 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police officials from two dozen Southland agencies gathered Tuesday to vent their frustrations with unlicensed or unqualified security guards in their cities, but many left the meeting optimistic about promised reforms in the screening of private-sector sentries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1997
I found your Sept. 22 article about the "crackdown" on malingering teens near Disneyland to be frankly appalling. What it really boils down to is yet another instance of our country's (and the media's) scapegoating of teens. While I do not advocate drug dealing or underage drinking, it's quite obvious that local police are using this as an excuse to harass any teen whom they deem to be "threatening." And in our increasingly xenophobic society, this seems to mean anyone who looks "different" than the police think they should.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1996 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gay community leaders and bar owners in the Hollywood and Silver Lake areas are complaining about allegedly overzealous bar inspections by the Los Angles Police Department. At a community meeting with police officials in Silver Lake on Wednesday night, critics said the LAPD and the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control are engaged in a crackdown on gay bars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1996 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Battle lines are being drawn in city council and school board meetings throughout Orange County over a bid by local law enforcement to impose a daytime curfew for school-age children. On the one side are civil libertarians and home-schooling advocates, who are warning that the imposition of a countywide curfew could result in a police state for kids, turning school-age children into second-class citizens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1996
I disagree with your editorial ("A Proper INS Presence in the Jails," May 29), because giving more power and resources to our local police will only enhance the racism that exists now in the city of Anaheim. The Anaheim Police Department officers discriminate against Latinos, whether they are documented or not. The Immigration and Naturalization Service should concentrate its efforts on the borders and not interfere with local politics. I'm afraid that, if we allow our local police to act as INS agents, it won't be too long before we will become a police state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1994 | Mexican author CARLOS FUENTES visited San Diego and Tijuana this week to participate in a transborder arts festival. He spoke about the immigration issue with Times Staff Writer Sebastian Rotella
It happened to Jewish communities throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. Or the reaction that Hitler fanned in Germany after World War I: You must find a scapegoat for the problems you yourself have created and which you do not wish to face. It is a cowardly act. It is an inhumane act. The deficit and unemployment in California are due to the end of the Cold War, the closure of defense industries, the advances in technology.
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