Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPolice Ussr
IN THE NEWS

Police Ussr

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | From United Press International
Lavrenti P. Beria, the notorious chief of Josef Stalin's secret police, killed prisoners "with his own hands" in a Georgian torture chamber, an official newspaper said Saturday in a horrifying account of Beria's trial. Beria and several aides were sentenced to death in December, 1953, nine months after Stalin's death, but details of his closed trial were not released until Trud, the official newspaper of the state-run trade unions, ran excerpts from the trial transcripts in Saturday's editions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting on a park bench and professionally eyeing the passers-by, KGB Maj. Andrei Borisov--his real rank but not his real name--told a tale Thursday of a spy agency in deep trouble, hurt and hopping mad. "Most people in the committee are in shock and terribly upset," he said, referring to the Komitet Gosudarstvennoi Bezopastnosti-- the Committee of State Security. "Everyone's on pins and needles, waiting. What will happen? What? Where?
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That wasn't Gorky Park that a burly Russian cop was swooping over Monday in a police helicopter. That was Griffith Park. Leningrad policeman Albert Vorontsov went airborne to get acquainted with Los Angeles and launch a first-ever swap of Soviet and local police officers that is aimed at spreading goodwill--and trading good ideas. Vorontsov will shadow Los Angeles Police Sgt. Greg Braun for two weeks. Then Braun will travel to the Soviet Union in June to work with Vorontsov.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | Reuters
Had one vodka too many? Call the police. Traffic cops in the Soviet city of Tselinograd have launched a commercial service for drivers who have had too much to drink. "Police officers, without the usual moralizing, will arrive and drive you home in your own car," the Communist Party daily Pravda said Tuesday. All it takes is a "sufficiently solid sum."
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Poland says a member of the Soviet secret police who signed the order for the World War II massacre of Polish officers in the Katyn forest is still alive and should be interrogated, the PAP news agency reported in Warsaw. It is alleged that Pyotr Karpovich Soprunenko, then a major in the secret police, signed the list of 4,200 officers ordered to be executed at Katyn in the spring of 1940. Justice Minister Aleksander Bentkowski said Soprunenko is living in Moscow.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting on a park bench and professionally eyeing the passers-by, KGB Maj. Andrei Borisov--his real rank but not his real name--told a tale Thursday of a spy agency in deep trouble, hurt and hopping mad. "Most people in the committee are in shock and terribly upset," he said, referring to the Komitet Gosudarstvennoi Bezopastnosti-- the Committee of State Security. "Everyone's on pins and needles, waiting. What will happen? What? Where?
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | Reuters
Had one vodka too many? Call the police. Traffic cops in the Soviet city of Tselinograd have launched a commercial service for drivers who have had too much to drink. "Police officers, without the usual moralizing, will arrive and drive you home in your own car," the Communist Party daily Pravda said Tuesday. All it takes is a "sufficiently solid sum."
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of Russian Federation leader Boris N. Yeltsin's supporters face a potentially explosive showdown outside the Kremlin today with an army of riot police loyal to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. As of Wednesday night, the Yeltsin camp refused to cancel the planned rally despite a government ban on all demonstrations for three weeks and ominous warnings from the Soviet vice president and top law-enforcement officials that "public disorder" could result.
NEWS
March 7, 1988
Police broke up a demonstration in central Moscow by several dozen people who were protesting what they said was a revival of Stalinism in the country, eyewitnesses said. They said several people were detained during the brief protest, timed to mark the 35th anniversary of the death of Kremlin dictator Josef Stalin on March 5, 1953. The demonstration was organized by the Perestroika-88 independent discussion group. Sergei I.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The KGB, the Soviet security police, opened the doors of its headquarters at Moscow's infamous Lubyanka Prison to the press Tuesday in its gathering campaign to demonstrate that President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's reforms have changed even it. "Our activities must be increasingly subjected to public control, and in protecting the state we must strive to protect human rights as well," Maj. Gen. Alexander N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian vagrant rose shakily from the cell's wooden bench and stared up in bleary disbelief at the tall figure in an unfamiliar midnight blue uniform and shiny badge. "Hi there, how you doing today?" the apparition asked in friendly English. "Lost your way home?" "He's a bum," Kasimir Zhukovsky, deputy chief of Leningrad's 28th Precinct, explained in Russian as the scruffy man continued to stare silently at Sgt. Greg Braun of the Los Angeles Police Department. "Do you have them, too?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three slightly built men in conservative suits spoke little English, and their hosts were able to manage even less Russian. But when they gathered together to talk shop Friday, there was at once a common language between them. "We are policemen, and they are policemen," said Aleksandr Kulikov in his native tongue, pausing to allow an interpreter to translate. "And it's the responsibility of policemen in their area to protect the people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That wasn't Gorky Park that a burly Russian cop was swooping over Monday in a police helicopter. That was Griffith Park. Leningrad policeman Albert Vorontsov went airborne to get acquainted with Los Angeles and launch a first-ever swap of Soviet and local police officers that is aimed at spreading goodwill--and trading good ideas. Vorontsov will shadow Los Angeles Police Sgt. Greg Braun for two weeks. Then Braun will travel to the Soviet Union in June to work with Vorontsov.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here, for a change, is a police chief imbroglio from the other side of the globe: The Komissarov Affair lacks damning videotape, it's true. But it offers its own special Soviet mix of dueling decrees, a beefy hero caught between the old and the new, a perilous hunger strike and a cast of tens of thousands of confused cops. Vyacheslav S.
NEWS
March 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tens of thousands of supporters of Boris N. Yeltsin, kept away from the Kremlin by 50,000 riot police and troops equipped with water cannon and horses, thronged central Moscow on Thursday to demand the ouster of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and their hero's election as Russian Federation president.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of Russian Federation leader Boris N. Yeltsin's supporters face a potentially explosive showdown outside the Kremlin today with an army of riot police loyal to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. As of Wednesday night, the Yeltsin camp refused to cancel the planned rally despite a government ban on all demonstrations for three weeks and ominous warnings from the Soviet vice president and top law-enforcement officials that "public disorder" could result.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Warnings of trouble at pro-democracy rallies, expected to attract hundreds of thousands Sunday, were issued by Soviet authorities Friday. Rallies are planned for Moscow, Leningrad, Sverdlovsk in the Urals and Kiev and Lvov in the Ukraine, among other cities. They will come ahead of key March 4 elections that are likely to see many longtime Communist officials swept from power. Defense Minister Dmitri T.
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, confronted with growing unrest across the Soviet Union and conservative demands for tougher measures to counter it, replaced his liberal interior minister on Sunday with a hard-line Communist Party official and appointed an army general as deputy. Although Gorbachev gave no explanation for the changes, conservative members of the Soviet Parliament on Saturday had demanded the removal of Vadim V.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet constitutional watchdog panel ruled Friday that President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's order drafting soldiers for police patrols lacks legality, but it let the controversial practice continue anyway. The Constitutional Compliance Committee, insisting that proper legal procedures be obeyed in the future, said that "precise legislative regulations" must be adopted by the Supreme Soviet, the nation's parliament, to govern the use of Soviet troops in such circumstances.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed troops will join police in patrolling the streets of the Soviet Union's major cities next week to combat rising street crime, the Kremlin announced Friday. In a joint order by the Soviet ministers of defense and of internal affairs, the government said that law and order are deteriorating even more rapidly than before, that criminals are now well armed and that "grave crimes of a vicious and cynical nature" are increasing. The new directive from Defense Minister Dmitri T.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|