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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1994
Your editorial "A Frightful Disease Is Banished" (Oct. 1) elicited memories of a terrifying day in 1950 when we rushed our 13-month-old son to the Communicable Diseases building at Los Angeles County Hospital, where we were given the dreaded diagnosis, "polio." After four months of daily visits, he was able to be removed from the iron lung and was breathing without assistance. Multiple surgeries and physical and mental anguish were part of his childhood and teen-age years. There are memories, too, of many others--the brave, young woman whose two young children and husband were patients there, the beautiful little girl named Claudia who stared at us from the iron lung next to our son's.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON - The World Health Organization declared Southeast Asia polio-free Thursday, marking a global health milestone for India, where the disease accounted for nearly half of all worldwide cases just five years ago. The announcement comes after an independent commission of public health experts determined that the 11-nation region, as defined by the WHO, has not had a confirmed polio case for the last three years.  Map: Worldwide Polio...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
A small number of children in California have come down with polio-like illnesses since 2012 -- suffering paralysis in one or more limbs and other symptoms -- and physicians and public health officials do not yet know why. A virus may play a role, said Dr. Carol Glaser, leader of a California Department of Public Health team investigating the illnesses, which are occurring sporadically throughout the state. The afflicted kids suffer severe weakness or paralysis, which strikes rapidly -- sometimes after a mild respiratory illness. Scans of the patients' spinal cords show patterns of damage similar to that found in polio sufferers , Glaser said. Two of the affected children tested positive for enterovirus-68, a virus that is usually associated with respiratory illness but which has been linked to polio-like illnesses as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
A small number of children in California have come down with polio-like illnesses since 2012 -- suffering paralysis in one or more limbs and other symptoms -- and physicians and public health officials do not yet know why. A virus may play a role, said Dr. Carol Glaser, leader of a California Department of Public Health team investigating the illnesses, which are occurring sporadically throughout the state. The afflicted kids suffer severe weakness or paralysis, which strikes rapidly -- sometimes after a mild respiratory illness. Scans of the patients' spinal cords show patterns of damage similar to that found in polio sufferers , Glaser said. Two of the affected children tested positive for enterovirus-68, a virus that is usually associated with respiratory illness but which has been linked to polio-like illnesses as well.
NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Bill Gates is taking a tough stance on polio -- and not everyone in the research community agrees with it. In the philanthropist's annual letter , in which he highlights the key issues he's focusing on as co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the founder of Microsoft began his yearly note on the issue of polio, so that it appeared above malaria and HIV/AIDS. Polio, which once infected, paralyzed and killed countless children every year, is now all but eradicated: According to the World Health Organization, the estimated number of polio cases per year dropped from 350,000 in 1988 to less than 1,500 in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
It's not hard to imagine why people would be intrigued by the unique story of Mark O'Brien, a journalist confined to an iron lung who, nearing age 40, enlisted a sex surrogate to help him lose his virginity. Writer-director Ben Lewin was clearly one such person, as his new film "The Sessions," starring John Hawkes and Helen Hunt, is based on O'Brien's life. O'Brien's story had particular resonance for Lewin, who, like O'Brien, contracted and survived polio at a young age. But as Lewin told Times film reporter John Horn during a recent installment of the Envelope Screening Series, he wasn't sure at first whether his personal background was influencing his notion that O'Brien's story could make for a successful feature film.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Things aren't going so well for Matt Lauer lately. The once-beloved "Today" host has taken a beating in the media, sparked by the awkward departure of co-host Ann Curry from the NBC show. Last month, the New York Times ran a front-page story discussing Lauer's dwindling popularity, and to make matters worse, the show's ratings have been in decline. While "Today" was once the champ of the network morning shows, it's now regularly ranked second behind ABC's "Good Morning America. " RATINGS: Cable versus broadcast shows But at least we know that Lauer is reading his own press, both good and bad. According to the New York Post, Lauer recently poked fun at his own troubles while hosting the UJA Federation of New York's Broadcast Cable & Film Division event.
NEWS
September 24, 1988 | United Press International
Israeli soldiers began receiving polio vaccinations Friday as part of a nationwide attack on the disease by health officials after 10 people contracted the virus in recent weeks.
WORLD
May 30, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Yemen said the number of children diagnosed with polio had risen to 179 as officials prepared to launch a nationwide immunization campaign. Yemeni Health Minister Mohammed Yahya Nuaymi told reporters the campaign would inoculate more than 4.6 million children younger than 5. Low immunization rates have helped the virus spread, according to the World Health Organization.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | From Reuters
The country launched a three-day campaign Saturday to vaccinate an estimated 3.3 million children against polio at 15,000 points across the country, the Health Ministry said. The campaign, involving 60,000 health officials and volunteers, will cost an estimated $4.2 million.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Zulfiqar Ali
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - Militants again took aim at a polio vaccination campaign in this provincial capital, killing one police officer and injuring another Sunday morning with a bomb blast. Police official S.P. Rahim Shah told reporters that a bomb was planted near a vaccination post set up near a graveyard on Charsadda Road in Peshawar. Authorities put security in the district on a red alert following the incident. The bombing marred the third round of a major polio vaccination campaign by the provincial government, which aims to inoculate 600,000 children against nine deadly diseases.
OPINION
January 3, 2014 | By Nancy A. Aossey and William Garvelink
Once virtually eradicated, polio again stalks the Horn of Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. The innocent victims are mostly young children. The perpetrators are insurgents and indifferent governments. The polio resurgence is preventable and it is time to pull out an old but proven technique to halt its spread: Days of Tranquility. This 30-year-old quaintly named tactic involves a negotiated cease-fire during which insurgents and governments allow humanitarian groups to reach children trapped by fighting and immunize them against infectious diseases, such as polio.
WORLD
December 13, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- Two policemen and a polio worker were killed by gunmen in separate incidents in restive northwest Pakistan on Friday, officials said. In the first case, suspected militants fired at two policemen reportedly on their way to guard polio vaccination workers in the Swabi district of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, police said. One of the policemen, Ijaz Ali, was killed immediately, while the second, Iftikhar Ali, died a few hours later at a hospital. Both were shot in the head, said an officer who saw their bodies.
WORLD
November 8, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - An outbreak of polio among children in war-torn Syria has prompted a mass immunization campaign that aims to vaccinate 20 million children in seven Middle Eastern nations and territories, the United Nations and the World Health Organization said Friday. An emergency drive to prevent the transmission of the crippling ailment and other preventable diseases has already resulted in the vaccination of 650,000 children in Syria, including 116,000 in the northeastern province of Dair Alzour, where the polio outbreak was confirmed a week ago, the international agencies said in a statement.
WORLD
October 7, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A bomb exploded near a government health center Monday in northwestern Pakistan as anti-polio kits were being distributed, killing two people and wounding at least 12, Pakistani officials said. The explosion in a suburb of Peshawar, the capital of restive Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province near the Afghan border, was apparently detonated by remote control. It was the latest in a series of attacks on polio workers in Pakistan. A policeman and a volunteer peace committee member were killed in the blast, which appeared to target police assigned to protect vaccinators shortly before they headed into nearby neighborhoods to administer the anti-polio vaccine, authorities said.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Thanks, ABC and Jenny McCarthy, for making it more likely that today's coddled children will get a taste of the character-building hardship our grandparents endured. Kids these days, they've had it so easy for so long, but they may finally get a dose of some old-world misery -- in the form of polio, whooping cough or smallpox. As a new parent (of twins!), I won't have any of it. You've probably learned by now that McCarthy will occupy a regular seat on the morning talk show "The View" starting in September, presumably bringing along her noxious anti-vaccine convictions . And for those who expect McCarthy's producers and co-hosts to tighten the reins when she spouts dangerous misinformation, take a hint from the no-so-subtle title of the show and put those expectations to rest.
WORLD
October 26, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
An emergency drive to vaccinate Nigerians against polio is being hindered by suspicion from Muslims. Health workers launched the drive Friday, racing to immunize 15 million children at immediate risk. But the four-day effort has been impeded by rumors among Muslims that the vaccine is part of a U.S. plot to spread AIDS and render Muslims infertile. Three predominantly Muslim states have either delayed or withheld permission for the vaccination drive. Nigeria has 192 known polio cases.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | Associated Press
Americans should make sure they've been vaccinated for polio before traveling to the Netherlands, where at least 52 people have been stricken with the disease, U.S. health officials cautioned on Thursday. "We do consider it serious," said Carrie Hartshorn, spokeswoman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's immunization division. The 52 cases include one death and 40 people who were paralyzed, according to new data from Dutch officials.
WORLD
May 28, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Alex Rodriguez
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - Gunmen killed a female polio worker and injured another near the northwest city of Peshawar on Tuesday, the latest in a series of assaults on vaccination teams working to eradicate the disease in Pakistan. The women were vaccinating children in Kaga Wala, a village perched on the edge of the country's volatile tribal belt, when two men opened fire, said Shafeeullah Khan, a local police official. One of the workers was critically injured in the attack and was being treated for gunshot wounds at a Peshawar hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013
Hilary Koprowski, a Polish-born researcher who developed the first successful oral vaccine for polio, has died. He was 96. Koprowski died of pneumonia April 11 at his Philadelphia home, said his son, Dr. Christopher Koprowski, a radiation oncologist. In 1950, Hilary Koprowski showed that it was possible to use his live-virus oral vaccine against polio, which had plagued the United States and other countries for decades. Another researcher, Dr. Albert Sabin, would win the race to get an oral vaccine licensed in the U.S. while Jonas Salk would develop an injectable vaccine that eliminated much of the disease in the country.
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