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Polio Virus

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Researchers last week reported the development of a possible AIDS vaccine that hooks up a key part of the deadly AIDS virus with a safe polio virus widely used in immunization programs. The potential vaccine was able to disarm a wide range of AIDS viral strains in studies of laboratory rabbits, but it has not yet been tested in humans, the scientists said. Reporting in the journal Nature, British researchers said they used genetic engineering techniques to tailor a model vaccine consisting of the Sabin polio virus and a protein from the outer membrane of the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, which causes AIDS.
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OPINION
January 3, 2014 | By Nancy A. Aossey and William Garvelink
Once virtually eradicated, polio again stalks the Horn of Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. The innocent victims are mostly young children. The perpetrators are insurgents and indifferent governments. The polio resurgence is preventable and it is time to pull out an old but proven technique to halt its spread: Days of Tranquility. This 30-year-old quaintly named tactic involves a negotiated cease-fire during which insurgents and governments allow humanitarian groups to reach children trapped by fighting and immunize them against infectious diseases, such as polio.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A recurrence of muscle weakness brought on by polio decades after a patient has recovered from the illness is apparently caused by the polio virus itself rather than other medical conditions, a new study has concluded. Some doctors have suggested that aging or a deterioration of once-damaged nerve cells, and not a new attack by the polio virus itself, causes the progressive weakness, muscle pain and other problems associated with the syndrome. But a team led by Mohammad K.
WORLD
November 8, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - An outbreak of polio among children in war-torn Syria has prompted a mass immunization campaign that aims to vaccinate 20 million children in seven Middle Eastern nations and territories, the United Nations and the World Health Organization said Friday. An emergency drive to prevent the transmission of the crippling ailment and other preventable diseases has already resulted in the vaccination of 650,000 children in Syria, including 116,000 in the northeastern province of Dair Alzour, where the polio outbreak was confirmed a week ago, the international agencies said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1985 | Associated Press
Using sophisticated computer graphics, medical researchers have pieced together a model of the virus responsible for polio, a development they say could lead to a safer vaccine for the crippling disease. The three-dimensional model was mapped out by Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation scientists, who recreated the chemical structure of the virus atom-by-atom. David J. Filman, a molecular biologist at Scripps, said the model construction is "equivalent to taking a picture without a lens."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1985 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
The molecular structure of the polio virus has been determined by a team of scientists led by members of the Research Institute of Scripps Clinic here. The finding, made public today, is expected to yield major benefits both in helping make a safer vaccine for polio--still a scourge ravaging half a million people annually worldwide--as well as helping to break the codes of other poorly understood viruses, such as hepatitis A.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
Some virologists and public health officials have long questioned whether childhood immunization against polio should end once the World Health Organization declares polio eradicated. The WHO program is only monitoring cases of acute paralysis in people to decide whether the virus has been eliminated. Critics say water and sewage systems could still be contaminated, so polio vaccines should continue to be a routine part of child immunizations. Konstantin M.
NEWS
October 26, 2010 | Mary Forgione , For the Los Angeles Times
A new oral polio vaccine is making headlines today — and small wonder. Polio may have been wiped out in America, but that’s not true for parts of Africa. And it's there that a new vaccine may finally put an end to the crippling disease. The bivalent oral polio vaccine, known as bOPV, immunizes children in high-risk countries for two key strains of the polio virus in one shot, according to findings published in Lancet on Tuesday. World Health Organization scientist Roland Sutter hailed the vaccine that could "get us to the finish line of polio eradication," Reuters reports.
WORLD
November 8, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - An outbreak of polio among children in war-torn Syria has prompted a mass immunization campaign that aims to vaccinate 20 million children in seven Middle Eastern nations and territories, the United Nations and the World Health Organization said Friday. An emergency drive to prevent the transmission of the crippling ailment and other preventable diseases has already resulted in the vaccination of 650,000 children in Syria, including 116,000 in the northeastern province of Dair Alzour, where the polio outbreak was confirmed a week ago, the international agencies said in a statement.
OPINION
January 3, 2014 | By Nancy A. Aossey and William Garvelink
Once virtually eradicated, polio again stalks the Horn of Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. The innocent victims are mostly young children. The perpetrators are insurgents and indifferent governments. The polio resurgence is preventable and it is time to pull out an old but proven technique to halt its spread: Days of Tranquility. This 30-year-old quaintly named tactic involves a negotiated cease-fire during which insurgents and governments allow humanitarian groups to reach children trapped by fighting and immunize them against infectious diseases, such as polio.
WORLD
October 7, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A bomb exploded near a government health center Monday in northwestern Pakistan as anti-polio kits were being distributed, killing two people and wounding at least 12, Pakistani officials said. The explosion in a suburb of Peshawar, the capital of restive Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province near the Afghan border, was apparently detonated by remote control. It was the latest in a series of attacks on polio workers in Pakistan. A policeman and a volunteer peace committee member were killed in the blast, which appeared to target police assigned to protect vaccinators shortly before they headed into nearby neighborhoods to administer the anti-polio vaccine, authorities said.
WORLD
December 18, 2012 | By Nasir Khan and Mark Magnier
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Five female anti-polio workers in Pakistan were slain Tuesday by gunmen on motorcycles, police said, on the second day of a three-day national immunization campaign. Four of the women were killed in Karachi, the nation's largest city, and the fifth in Peshawar. Sagheer Ahmed, the health minister for Sindh province, whose capital is Karachi, ordered a halt to the anti-polio drive in the port city after the shootings. Health officials said vaccinations were also halted until further notice in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, where Peshawar is located.
WORLD
June 26, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Scientists, health workers and community outreach officials in India believe they're finally on the cusp of a major milestone, the defeat of polio throughout the country. The polio virus, which attacks the nervous system, has been largely eliminated in most other countries through immunizations. But it has remained a frustratingly significant threat in India, as well as in Nigeria, Afghanistan and Pakistan, largely because of unsanitary conditions. It wasn't too long ago that polio killed or crippled 100,000 children in India each year.
OPINION
February 9, 2011 | By Wendy Orent
We've been waiting a long time for the eradication of polio. Since the World Health Organization's 1988 decision to eliminate polio from nature, as it once did smallpox, billions of dollars have been funneled into this long war. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation alone has contributed more than $1 billion since 1999 to the effort, and it recently pledged an additional $119 million. The massive campaign has included armies of eradicators, mountains of research and the dedication of numerous governments and NGOs.
NEWS
December 16, 2010
British and U.S. researchers are developing a new virtually risk-free polio vaccine that "tricks" the body into triggering its immune system to counteract the polio virus, according to British media reports this week. Unlike other polio vaccines, this replica, or hoax vaccine, bypasses the need to import any poliovirus cells into the body. Researchers are optimistic as they embark on the first stage of testing. "This is an entirely new strategic approach against polio," Dr. Nicola Stonehouse of the University of Leeds says in a statement.
NEWS
October 26, 2010 | Mary Forgione , For the Los Angeles Times
A new oral polio vaccine is making headlines today — and small wonder. Polio may have been wiped out in America, but that’s not true for parts of Africa. And it's there that a new vaccine may finally put an end to the crippling disease. The bivalent oral polio vaccine, known as bOPV, immunizes children in high-risk countries for two key strains of the polio virus in one shot, according to findings published in Lancet on Tuesday. World Health Organization scientist Roland Sutter hailed the vaccine that could "get us to the finish line of polio eradication," Reuters reports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Thomas C. Peebles, a World War II bomber pilot who isolated the measles virus, setting the stage for development of the vaccine that freed the world from the deadly scourge, died July 8 at his home in Port Charlotte, Fla. He was 89. Peebles also led a team that showed the tetanus vaccine could be given every decade instead of every year, developed a way to add fluoride to children's vitamins to prevent tooth decay and founded one of the country's...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1995
Re "A Remarkable Life, an Extraordinary Era," editorial, June 26: Dr. Jonas Salk well deserves your tribute for having contributed to the elimination of the horrible polio scourge. That he was able to do so was because Drs. John Enders, Tom Weller and Fred Robbins at Harvard Medical School developed the technique of virus culture in roller tubes, including the polio virus, the measles virus, the varicella/zoster virus, etc., for which they most deservedly received the Nobel Prize.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Thomas C. Peebles, a World War II bomber pilot who isolated the measles virus, setting the stage for development of the vaccine that freed the world from the deadly scourge, died July 8 at his home in Port Charlotte, Fla. He was 89. Peebles also led a team that showed the tetanus vaccine could be given every decade instead of every year, developed a way to add fluoride to children's vitamins to prevent tooth decay and founded one of the country's...
SCIENCE
January 22, 2009 | Mary Engel
In one of its largest grants ever, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation donated $255 million Wednesday toward the push to eradicate polio, a goal that has eluded world health agencies for decades but that many still consider doable, possibly within five years. Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates made the announcement of the grant to Rotary International at a meeting of the service organization in San Diego.
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