Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPolitical Agenda
IN THE NEWS

Political Agenda

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2000
If presidential candidates must pander, and evidently they believe they must, then at least the pandering should make political sense. Vice President Al Gore's caving in to the pressure of Miami's Cuban American community in the Elian Gonzalez custody case is neither politically sensible nor right.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Much of the adult film industry was halted over the weekend after the third performer in a month tested positive for HIV. And on Monday, an advocacy group said a fourth performer had come forward as HIV-positive, although adult industry officials dismissed the report as a "rumor. " The Free Speech Coalition, an adult industry trade group, called a weeklong filming moratorium last month after actress Cameron Bay tested HIV-positive. A second performer, Rod Daily, who is romantically linked to Bay, announced his status on Twitter and to the Daily News shortly after filming resumed - but that case was not officially reported to the industry group and did not result in a new moratorium.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 22, 1992
Kip Dellinger's letter (Times, Oct. 15) accuses Santa Monica High School teachers of having a common political agenda. He could not be more mistaken. We differ dramatically on almost every issue except one--our determination to provide a first-rate education for students. This is our agenda. To accuse the school of shrinking from honest discourse is absurd. I invite Mr. Dellinger to visit our classes, where he could in one day hear students discussing authors as varied as Sophocles, Sandra Cisneros, Homer, Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright and Shakespeare.
WORLD
February 1, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - They are a bedraggled front line, shock troops with scabbed faces and gunshot wounds, many of them boys with runny noses and sandaled feet, standing beyond police barricades with gasoline bombs, swords and stones. They are legion, angry young men and grade school dropouts without jobs, prospects or political ideologies. They battle Egyptian police through the fog of tear gas, advancing and retreating over charred streets and shattered glass. They are as persistent as horseflies, an endless buzz at the edge of protest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1990 | ARMANDO ACUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with the defeat of her major City Hall initiatives this year by a "mindless smorgasbord of silliness," Mayor Maureen O'Connor on Thursday outlined a revised political agenda that will take her around the world on a personal political mission. In doing so, the mayor acknowledged that her much-debated tactic of announcing she wouldn't seek reelection in two years backfired. O'Connor, talking to a luncheon audience of the city's Hotel Motel Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1997 | WILLIAM A. DONOHUE, William A. Donohue is president of the Catholic League, which defends individual Catholics and the institutional church from defamation and discrimination. The league is based in New York
Howard Rosenberg likes the pilot to ABC's "Nothing Sacred" but confesses that he understands why some Catholics might be troubled, if not outraged, by the show (" 'Nothing Sacred,' but Much Ventured," Calendar, Aug. 6). Let me explain why.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2003 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
When the leader of the California Assembly announced plans for lawmakers to conduct town hall meetings across the state, they were billed as a chance to hear what real people think about the budget crisis. But a Democratic Party internal memo suggests that the audiences will be deliberately stacked with like-minded Democrats and witnesses will be hand-picked to "convey the desired message."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1988 | ROBERT P. SCHIFFERMAN, Robert P. Schifferman is a Superior Court judge for the County of Los Angeles, assigned to Glendale. and
A judge has been defined as "a lawyer who knew a governor." This sardonic observation, while often factually incorrect, mirrors the fact that members of the American judiciary, from justices of the peace to judges of our highest courts, are frequently not selected by the appointive powers on the basis of demonstrated ability, but rather to meet political or social agendas.
NATIONAL
September 3, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scouring their speeches from the 2000 election, President Bush and Al Gore, his Democratic rival, can both find moments when they urged increased vigilance against terrorists. But terrorism wasn't a central, or even a secondary, issue in their fiercely fought campaign. Neither candidate suggested that defending against terrorism would soon become perhaps the preeminent challenge facing the United States.
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger pleaded not guilty Tuesday to the latest charge stemming from the Iran-Contra scandal, claiming he had become "a pawn in a clearly political agenda." The former Californian, who faces trial Jan. 5 on five Iran-Contra charges, entered his plea in federal court and afterward assailed prosecutors for producing the pre-election indictment that also cast President Bush in an unfavorable light. Prosecutor James J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2012 | By Evan Halper and Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Sam Blakeslee said he was putting personal ambition aside. The maverick GOP lawmaker from San Luis Obispo announced he would leave politics to run a nonprofit bankrolled by a big donor. His only aim at the California Reform Institute would be to promote common-sense solutions to big policy problems vexing Sacramento. An early "Strategic Plan" for the nonprofit reviewed by The Times, however, lays out a different goal: "Devise and execute a plan that makes Blakeslee a politically viable candidate for Republican statewide office in 2014.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
After they were forced out of City Hall park last year, some members of Occupy L.A. made their stand half a mile away on a sidewalk on Towne Avenue that became known as "Occupy Skid Row. " The encampment, which included homeless people and activists from around the region, took on more political significance in recent months as Occupy made the issue of homeless rights and downtown gentrification its new rallying cry. But this summer, the Los...
OPINION
June 5, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
It should surprise no one that I'm opposed to the recall of Scott Walker, the Wisconsin governor whose fate will be decided Tuesday. But that's only in part because I support what he's been trying to do in the Badger State. I'm also against recalls as a matter of principle. In 2003, I was one of the few conservatives opposed to the recall of Gray Davis, arguably the worst California governor in modern memory. Davis didn't deserve to stay in office, but the voters of California deserved to keep him. Democracy depends on accountability, not just for individual politicians but for their parties and programs.
WORLD
July 27, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
In an illustration of its growing muscle in Iraq as U.S. influence wanes, anti-American cleric Muqtada Sadr's movement has won pardons for at least 50 prisoners jailed for crimes including murder, kidnapping and attacks on U.S. troops. The amnesties come at a time when U.S. forces remaining in Iraq have faced an increased number of attacks, many by Shiite Muslim militias associated with the Sadr movement. And they have angered some senior Iraqi officials, who charge that the law is being applied selectively and bent to fit a hidden political agenda.
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | Patrick Goldstein, Los Angeles Times
Liberal Hollywood has been taking a beating in recent days, thanks to the fallout from a provocative new expose called "Primetime Propaganda: The True Hollywood Story of How the Left Took Over Your TV. " Written by Ben Shapiro, a 27-year-old Harvard Law School grad who is an executive at a conservative talk show radio network, the book is a sensation in the conservative media world, earning admiring coverage from virtually every corner of the...
OPINION
August 31, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
Predictably, conservative commentator Glenn Beck's "Restoring Honor" rally Saturday on the National Mall has evoked a lot of consternation. For instance, Greg Sargent of the Washington Post argues that because the rally explicitly avoided trumpeting a political agenda, it was all the more insidiously political. "Beck repeatedly claimed that his rally wasn't meant to be 'political,' " writes Sargent. "As high-minded as that may sound, the real point of stressing the rally's apolitical goals was political.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1995 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One day after a vote to temporarily suspend Planned Parenthood and AIDS Care speakers from sex-education workshops, county Superintendent of Schools Charles Weis on Tuesday blasted members of the Board of Education for their "far-right political agenda." In his strongest criticism yet of the new conservative board majority, Weis chastised Trustees Marty Bates, Angela N.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2008 | Manya A. Brachear, Chicago Tribune
The Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. told journalist Bill Moyers that media organizations circulating controversial sound bites of his sermons on the Internet wanted to paint him as "un-American" or "some sort of fanatic" to bring down Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A federal judge in Columbus fined a leader of the movement challenging President Obama's citizenship and warned her against using the legal system to pursue "political rhetoric and insults." U.S. District Judge Clay D. Land's scathing 43-page order, issued Tuesday, said California lawyer and dentist Orly Taitz had filed "frivolous" litigation and attempted to misuse the courts to push a political agenda. Taitz, a leader of the so-called birther movement, sued in Georgia federal court on behalf of Army Capt.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2009 | Tom Hamburger
Conservative activists blasted it as socialist. Worried parents called for boycotts. School administrators struggled over whether to let students hear it. But in the "back to school" speech Barack Obama plans to give Tuesday, he will do what American presidents have done before -- urge students to work hard, stay in school and follow their dreams. "If you quit on school, you're not just quitting on yourself, you're quitting on your country," Obama will say in the speech, which is loaded with similar exhortations.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|