Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPolitical Candidates
IN THE NEWS

Political Candidates

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 25, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Campaign season has just begun in the most electorally lopsided county in the state, where "two-party politics" means Democrat and, well, Democrat, and the Republican Central Committee recently met to make its big quadrennial decision: which Democrat to endorse for mayor. Hard on the heels of the Pledge of Allegiance, addressed to the kind of miniature flag that sticks out of graves on Memorial Day, the committee launched into fight No.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 4, 2013 | Mark Z. Barabak
Matt Bevin stood beneath Kentucky's Capitol dome and tore into all the things wrong with Congress, starting with the state's U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell. "How," Bevin demanded, "can we begin to remedy what ails us as a nation ... if we continue to send the very same tired ideas and tired people to Washington over and over and over again?" Soon enough Alison Lundergan Grimes chimed in. "D.C. has come to stand for the dysfunctional capital," she told a pair of reporters after touring a distribution warehouse in northern Kentucky, "and after 28 years in Washington, Mitch McConnell is the institution and the reason that it's broken down.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 16, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reversing course, the Supreme Court for the first time struck down a forced drug-testing program Tuesday, ruling that Georgia violated the 4th Amendment by requiring political candidates to undergo tests for purely symbolic purposes. While Georgia is the only state to pass such a law, the court's opinion voiding it is expected to have a broad impact in limiting the government's use of drug testing to situations involving public safety.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
If you think Citizens United has unleashed a torrent of cash and real corruption into our electoral system - and it has - brace yourself for something worse. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a campaign finance case that could be even bigger than Citizens United, which was decided in 2010. The new case, McCutcheon vs. FEC, challenges the aggregate spending rules that limit any one campaign contributor to $123,000 in total spending to political candidates and election committees during any two-year federal election cycle.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When 32-year-old theoretical physicist Ron Unz decided to run for governor, even some friends tried to talk him out of it. "Politics is not the kind of thing you expect geniuses to go into," said Eric Reyburn, who attended Harvard University with Unz. Rivko Knox, Unz's aunt, worried that the race would be brutal. "I said: 'Can you take criticism? What if you speak and people laugh at you?' " David Horowitz, the conservative activist, was more blunt.
NEWS
January 21, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Javier Perez de Cuellar, the former U.N. secretary general now running for the Peruvian presidency, has injected his campaign with all the excitement of a 300-page U.N. report on South American shipping regulations. Opponents of President Alberto Fujimori had hoped that a diplomat of Perez de Cuellar's stature would inspire the confidence of Peruvian voters, thwarting Fujimori's try for a second term in power. But it hasn't happened so far.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three candidates for leadership of the ruling Conservative Party, a post whose occupant automatically becomes prime minister, turned to television Sunday to carry their campaigns to the people. By day's end, the consensus backed by opinion polls put political outsider Michael Heseltine, a former defense minister, in a neck-and-neck race with Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major, with Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd trailing behind.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Assemblyman Mickey Conroy (R-Orange), a candidate for Orange County supervisor, shocked onlookers at a Republican Party headquarters rally this week by making obscene gestures--and some say shouting profanities--at his opponent. The controversial Conroy, 68, an assemblyman since 1991 who is leaving Sacramento because of term limits, acknowledged that he gave the finger to his rival, Todd Spitzer, a deputy district attorney.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt, who has clashed with broadcasters in the past, Tuesday renewed his call for the industry to boost its public-interest obligations. Addressing the industry's annual convention here, Hundt cited such issues as free time to political candidates, increasing the number of public-service announcements, educational television and a code of industry policy toward liquor advertising with an eye on protecting children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2000 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti's two challengers in the March 7 primary election criticized the county's top prosecutor Tuesday night for his handling of the Belmont Learning Complex fiasco and Rampart police scandal and for not attending the debate. "The fact that Gil Garcetti is not here tonight speaks loudly, . . . " said candidate Barry Groveman. "It's indicative of the problem that prompted both of us to run."
OPINION
October 7, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Almost 40 years ago, in Buckley vs. Valeo, the Supreme Court ruled that Congress didn't violate the 1st Amendment when it imposed reasonable limits on contributions to political candidates and campaign committees in an attempt to check the role of big money in politics. That bedrock of campaign finance law survived even the court's ill-conceived decision in Citizens United three years ago removing restrictions on independent political spending by corporations and unions. But some wealthy Americans have never reconciled themselves to the idea that they can't lavish as much money as they want on their favorite candidates, and some Supreme Court justices are sympathetic to that point of view.
OPINION
September 8, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Churches and other nonprofits long have been forbidden from endorsing political candidates. But erratic enforcement of the law has emboldened supporters of legislation in Congress that would end the restriction. Far from needing to be repealed, the ban on politics in the pulpit ought to be enforced more aggressively. A bill sponsored by Rep. Walter Jones (R-N.C.) would repeal a 1954 amendment to the tax code sponsored by then-Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson. The amendment says that churches and other so-called 501(c)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2013 | Catherine Saillant
City Councilman Dennis Zine holds a significant lead among likely voters in his race against Ron Galperin for the city controller's seat in the May 21 runoff election, a USC Price/Los Angeles Times poll shows. Zine, a three-term councilman, is the choice of 34% of respondents, according to the bipartisan survey of 500 likely voters conducted over three days last week. That compares with 22% who said they would probably vote for Galperin, a city commissioner and attorney. Poll director Dan Schnur, of USC, said the findings indicate that Zine has the advantage at this point in what has largely been a low-profile campaign.
OPINION
March 24, 2013 | By Michael Klarman
Court decisions sometimes spark dramatic political backlashes. Brown vs. Board of Education, which struck down school segregation laws in 1954, temporarily retarded progressive racial reform in the South and advanced the political careers of racial extremists. Furman vs. Georgia (1972), which strictly limited capital punishment, increased support for the death penalty, and Roe vs. Wade (1973) catalyzed a powerful right-to-life movement. The Massachusetts Supreme Court's 2003 ruling in favor of marriage equality led 25 states to enact constitutional amendments barring it. One possible outcome of the Hollingsworth vs. Perry litigation currently before the Supreme Court, which challenges California's Proposition 8, is a broad ruling in favor of marriage equality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2013 | Laura J. Nelson
On a sunny Friday morning, men flitted around the MacArthur Park bathrooms like moths to a flame. "See that activity there?" Los Angeles City Council candidate Jose Gardea said. "Drug activity. That has got to stop. " The squat building that borders Alvarado Street, Gardea says, represents the problems with the park, which has long been a stronghold of illegal activity. Cleaning it up, which Gardea estimates could cost $18 million, would include adding police, restoring the red-flagged boathouse and putting boats back on the lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2013 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Mayoral candidate Kevin James clawed his way into the thick of the race for mayor of Los Angeles, but a harsh TV ad last month turned off twice as many voters as it won over, according to a USC Price/Los Angeles Times online survey. That reaction contrasts strongly with viewers' feelings about more upbeat ads for front-runners Eric Garcetti and Wendy Greuel, the survey found. The James ad, financed by the independent group Better Way L.A., blames the three sitting politicians running for mayor - City Controller Greuel, Councilman Garcetti and Councilwoman Jan Perry - for the city's "loss of services, crumbling streets" and "bankruptcy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1992 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
A group of Democratic candidates for state and federal offices in Orange County said Friday they hope to break the GOP lock on local elections this year by riding the coattails of their party's surging presidential ticket. Democrats represent only one of the 17 seats in the delegations to Sacramento and Washington from California's strongest Republican territory. And they have been far behind the local GOP in raising money or getting votes when it comes to election campaigns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1990 | BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Republican Party Chairman Thomas A. Fuentes says it is the local GOP's 11th commandment: "Thou shalt not speak ill of a fellow Republican." Phyllis Badham, who is trying to unseat incumbent Assemblyman Gil Ferguson in the 70th District, speaks of it in less reverential terms. "I'm going to abolish it when I'm elected," she said this week.
WORLD
December 29, 2012 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - First, Silvio Berlusconi, who was driven from power last year by Italy's economic woes and his own scandals, said he wanted back his old job as prime minister. Then Mario Monti, an appointed technocrat who succeeded him at the head of an unelected government, kept the nation guessing for weeks before suddenly declaring that he would dive into politics and seek to lead the next government. They're only part of a perplexing lineup of political candidates voters will face in February's elections as political parties begin a frantic search for coalition partners.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|