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Political Cartoonist

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2002
Alberto Beltran Garcia, 80, a noted painted, engraver and political cartoonist in Mexico, died Friday at a Mexico City hospital of complications from a cerebral hemorrhage. Born in Mexico City, Beltran began studying art when he was 15 and soon landed a job drawing illustrations for several local publishers. His illustrations were so popular that readers began snapping up books that contained his work, bolstering a publishing industry that was struggling through a prolonged sales slump.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2002 | From Associated Press
Louis Mitelberg, a cartoonist who for decades lampooned political leaders such as former French President Charles de Gaulle, died Monday. He was 82. The cartoonist, sculptor and former Resistance fighter died at a hospital in Paris, said his wife, Zuka. The cause of death was not immediately known, but he had been hospitalized since June after a heart attack, she said. Born Jan. 23, 1919, in Kaluszyn, Poland, Mitelberg moved to Paris in 1938 to study architecture.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was born in the waning days of one century, endured a second and, with a little luck, will soon greet a third. "True, I lived only 95 days in the 19th century," Boris Yefimov says with sly modesty. "And then together with the rest of the planet I entered the 20th century. We could not have suspected that it would be so awful, so troubled, so unprecedented in human history." Yefimov is no ordinary centenarian--and not just because he is an eminent political cartoonist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1998
Re "Let Public Speak, Voters Decide," editorial, Sept. 13. If I were a political cartoonist I would draw a cartoon of Thousand Oaks Mayor Mike Markey examining the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The caption would read, "What's this?" SAMUEL M. ROSEN, Newbury Park
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1997
Raymond Jackson, 70, the London political cartoonist known as "Jak." Jackson had been the principal cartoonist at London's Evening Standard newspaper since 1952, and claimed to be the first cartoonist to break the British media's self-imposed ban on caricaturing Queen Elizabeth II. When Barings Bank went bankrupt in 1995 after wild deals by rogue trader Nick Leeson, Jak depicted the queen trying in vain to get money from a Barings cash machine. "That's funny, Philip," she said to her husband.
NEWS
October 12, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stretched out in his bed at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital, where he is recovering from kidney surgery, Ding Cong hardly looks like one of the most dangerous men in China. During World War II, Ding worked with the American Office of Strategic Services, precursor to the CIA, and was instrumental in the propaganda campaign against Japan. Later he took the winning, Communist side in China's civil war. Ding, 80, has never wielded anything more lethal than a paintbrush.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1996 | DEBORAH BAKER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bill Mauldin was close to euphoric. Not at the prospect of telling a visitor his life story, or of showing off the Pulitzer Prizes on the breakfast room wall. And not at the opportunity to autograph books for the appliance repairman who showed up at the front door at his home here with three copies of Mauldin's classic World War II cartoons. Nope, it was the impending delivery of an automobile engine that had Mauldin in high spirits.
NEWS
December 24, 1994
Robert Osborn, 90, a caricaturist, cartoonist and satiric commentator known for his superior drawing ability and sharp wit. In the New Republic and other magazines, Osborn often ridiculed presidents from Lyndon B. Johnson through Ronald Reagan. Osborn enlisted in the Navy at the outbreak of World War II, and his talents were put to use in drawing for training manuals. Over the years, he continued to draw for the Navy, publishing his cartoons in Naval Aviation News.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1993
I heard that Conrad was retiring and tears welled up in my eyes; a quiet, muffled curse slipped out between my lips, and an overwhelming sense of loss steamrolled over me. Other times when I had felt like this were when Hank Aaron retired, Muhammad Ali quit boxing, and Sandy Kofax left baseball. For like no other political cartoonist ever, Paul Conrad hit more home runs, threw more knockout blows and pitched more strikes at the hypocritical, the sententious and the unjust. He can say more with a few brush strokes than some reporters can with 5,000 words.
NEWS
January 25, 1993
Paul Conrad, three-time Pulitzer Prize winner and political cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times since 1964, will retire from the newspaper March 31. Conrad, 68, will continue to have his cartoons distributed by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate, and his cartoons will appear twice a week in The Times. The paper will also continue to carry the work of a variety of other editorial cartoonists.
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