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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gabriel A. Almond, 91, Stanford political science expert on "political culture" whose doctoral thesis about the role of the wealthy in New York City politics was published 60 years after he wrote it, died Dec. 25. Almond died in Palo Alto after several years of heart disease, heart attacks and bypass surgeries. A prolific writer and editor of books of political analysis, Almond was born in Rock Island, Ill.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Karen R. Long
Spider webs combine a strength and elasticity unmatched by anything we humans can make. They don't trigger much of an immune response in us and are "insoluble in water, two facts that the classical Greeks exploited when they used cobwebs to patch bleeding wounds," notes science writer Adam Rutherford. These days, spider silk has inspired another innovative use. Utah State University researchers have spliced DNA from the golden orb-weaver spider into the genome of a goat named Freckles, adjacent to her own coded base pairs for prompting the production of milk.
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OPINION
January 21, 2001
Eliminating authoritarianism, "patronism" and "caudilloism" and supporting women's rights need to be a continuous part of Vicente Fox's agenda as the leader of Mexico. Roderic Ai Camp is absolutely correct ("Vicente Fox's Election Is Just the Tip of the Iceberg," Commentary, Jan. 14) in stating that "political process affects the political culture rather than political culture determining the characteristics of the process." However, suggesting that the PRI take a path of "rebuilding its strength through grass-roots organizations" won't be easy because "traditional linkage to and control over the state" have been a part of the culture for centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
French filmmaker Olivier Assayas has said all of his films have autobiographical elements in them, even if the exact details may be unrecognizable across his wide-ranging body of work. Assayas' sensitive portrayals of the changes in contemporary life, touching on globalization, technology and personal relationships, led the Austrian critic Alexander Horwath, in a recent book preface, to declare the filmmaker "one of the defining voices in the past quarter-century of cinema. " "Cold Water," Assayas' international breakthrough in 1994 about teenage romance and self-discovery, was the most obviously autobiographical of his films.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1986
How interesting to see what Podhoretz reveals about himself in his article. He ends with a particularly fine example of what one has learned to expect from him: " . . . the cancerous spread of pacifist inclinations that now pervade our political culture." If, according to this view, the "cancerous" illness is pacifism, does it not follow that the author considers war to be the "norm"? (No pun intended, although the temptation is strong.) What is to be said about a mind capable of such distortion?
OPINION
November 15, 1992
Irredentism is a political philosophy whose name derives from the Italian word irredenta , meaning "unredeemed," and from an Italian political movement of the late 19th Century that sought to capture or "redeem" (a later generation would say "liberate") territory adjacent to Italy where substantial numbers of Italians had long lived under Austrian or other non-Italian rule. Irredentism has had a long and ugly career.
OPINION
September 29, 2005
TOM DELAY HAS BEEN so intellectually dishonest for so long that news that he may have been criminally dishonest hardly comes as a surprise. The question now is how much worse the political culture will become before it can get better. DeLay's indictment on a single count of conspiracy to violate state election laws has drawn predictable reactions from Democrats and his fellow Republicans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989
Conrad's cartoon depicts Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, a Jewish Star of David on his sleeve, ominously fixing a machine gun on blindfolded Bush men, their hands tied behind their backs. However scurrilous the cartoon, the objections do not challenge Conrad's First Amendment rights. The question is one of fairness, civility, and political culture. Political cartoons are not means to be taken literally. Cartoons caricature. They trade on grotesque exaggerations. But are there no limits to graphic perversions?
OPINION
January 16, 2005 | Mickey Kaus, Mickey Kaus writes the kausfiles blog for Slate.com.
An experimental column in which the Los Angeles Times invites outside critics to take their best shot at Southern California's heaviest newspaper. Did you know that Mayor James Hahn's marriage had collapsed? And the kids are living with him, not his wife? I didn't know that. When I tell people I run into, they're surprised too -- surprised they didn't know. Why don't they know? Because these people read the Los Angeles Times!
OPINION
January 14, 2001 | RODERIC AI CAMP, Roderic Ai Camp, a professor of government at Claremont McKenna College, is the author of "Politics in Mexico: the Decline of Authoritarianism" (Oxford University Press, 1999)
The election of President Vicente Fox in Mexico has introduced some remarkable political changes that presage dramatic, long-term implications beyond this decade. First, and most important, before last July's election, only 40% of Mexicans believed their country was a democracy. Immediately after the election, 63% described Mexico as a democracy, a whopping 50%-plus increase.
WORLD
April 29, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Hold the martini, please. With fanfare and cheers from Islamists, the first nonalcoholic hotel in Egypt's Red Sea resort of Hurghada has opened, a testament to a new political culture, which seeks at the very least a veneer of piety in a nation caught in the fury of upheaval. Egypt is mired in political and economic problems. It drifts from crisis to crisis and is headed for a dangerous summer of power outages and gas shortages. Such temporal annoyances, however, have not dissuaded conservative Islamists from trying to bring the nation in closer sync with the Koran.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By Rima Marrouch
BEIRUT - When Mazen El Sayed, a.k.a. El Rass, picks up a microphone, his provocative phrasings may lock in on any number of targets: Islamic clerics, the West, Arab regimes, social inequities. "We are all made from the same steel," the Lebanese hip-hop artist proclaims, "but the blacksmith is rotten. " El Rass' broadsides are delivered in singular thrusts of the Arab language, resulting in imaginative lines evoking "the optimistic suicide bomber" or lauding "a rebel critical of the rebellion.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
It's with David Chase's much-honored individualism in mind that one should best approach - and best enjoy - his first feature film as a writer-director, the wonderfully immersive and evocative "Not Fade Away. " Despite the nostalgia-drenched idealism coursing through it - and a cinematic familiarity to the subject matter - this is not a story that's neatly told or safely predictable. The result, though, proves a warmly reflective, diligently crafted and confidently digressive flashback to a time, a place and people Chase, the creator of "The Sopranos," knows like the back of his hand (as it's largely drawn from the filmmaker's own coming of age)
OPINION
April 29, 2012
Twenty years ago Sunday, on a warm spring afternoon, Los Angeles fell apart. It started with the announcement of not-guilty verdicts on all but one count against the police officers who had beaten Rodney King into submission. It flared in confrontations in neighborhood after neighborhood, was fanned by television images of a truck driver being dragged from his vehicle at the intersection of Florence and Normandie, and was inflamed by a raucous mob that rampaged through downtown that night, starting at police headquarters and spreading out from there.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
In the blithe romantic comedy "Habana Eva," playing Friday and Saturday at the Los Angeles Film Festival , the frisky, young Cuban heroine faces several thorny choices. Should she stand by her loyal-but-lethargic Cuban boyfriend, or bed down with a rich, dashing Venezuelan photographer? Stick with her seamstress job in a state-run factory, or take the plunge into entrepreneurial capitalism by becoming a fashion designer? Hold fast to the old revolutionary ideals, or embrace the new spirit of globalization that's encroaching on Cuba like the waves pounding the Malecon sea wall?
OPINION
April 11, 2011 | Gregory Rodriguez
Last week, after the brutal beating of a Giants fan in the Dodgers Stadium parking lot, Los Angeles and San Francisco officials issued a public plea for more "civility and common decency" among sports fans. In January, the shootings in Tucson in which six people were killed and 13 wounded, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, sparked a national conversation on civility in politics. The following month, the University of Arizona established the National Institute for Civil Discourse to advocate greater civility in all corners of the public square.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1988
Your editorial "Repression in Jordan" (May 3), branding Jordan as a "repressive society" simply because its government decided to withdraw the press credentials of the NBC correspondent in Amman, is totally unwarranted. The measure was an isolated action, the first of its kind taken by the Jordanian authorities against a foreign correspondent--and decided upon only after several incidents had left them with no other choice. To convey, without valid reason, such a negative image of Jordan to your readers is a most regrettable distortion of reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1991 | MELOR STURUA, Melor Sturua has been a columnist for Izvestia in Moscow for more than 40 years. He is a visiting professor at the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. and
During his recent talks in the Kremlin with Secretary of State James A. Baker III, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev indulged, as usual, in a rambling monologue about the internal situation in the Soviet Union. The purpose of this monologue, I suspect, was not so much to enlighten Baker as to impress him with a questionable intellectualism. For example, Gorbachev spoke about a "moral political directive"--in other words, defining political events in a moral framework.
WORLD
October 4, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
If you ask Xu Peifen what she thinks of Beijingers, she puffs out her chest and squares her shoulders, doing the best imitation of a pompous bureaucrat that can be mustered by a plump, middle-aged woman standing in the kitchen with an apron tied around her. "They stand like this," says the 56-year-old restaurateur, hands on hips, adding a scowl to her performance. "They're sooo annoying. Just because they come from the capital, they act like they're running the country. " The antipathy is mutual.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2010 | By Zachary Karabell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A World Without Islam Graham Fuller Little, Brown: 336 pp., $25.99 One of the sadder consequences of the near decade of war and violence that has followed the attacks of 9/11 is that so many people are convinced that we are in a clash of civilizations divided along religious fault lines. The concept was popularized by Harvard political scientist Samuel Huntington in the mid-1990s, but he didn't invent the idea; he gave it a name. Until 9/11, however, it was both debated and debatable.
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