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Political Drama

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September 17, 1995 | RICHARDEDER
In the days when we were told stories and believed in them, "once upon a time" was a reassuring invocation. Reassuring because it meant that there would be a story and that it was about to begin, but also for another reason. It promised an ending down the way that was not a shattering of the story but part of it. "Once," with its mortality, was laid neatly "upon" the bosom of "time," which existed before and during, and would exist afterward.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1996 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Four years ago, veteran British actor Kenneth Cranham was getting ready for the opening of his first stage play in five years--"An Inspector Calls," at the Royal National Theatre--when he happened to run into an older colleague on the street. No sooner had the two thespians caught up with each other's activities than the elder man asked Cranham the question many in the London theater were surely wondering about, though they were perhaps too polite to ask.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2002 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Hollywood, conventional wisdom says you can't make movies about politics because no one cares enough to watch. In San Francisco, you can't hold a political race without everyone watching every minute. This election season's most captivating race here stars the daughter of a storied San Francisco politician and the son of a Sacramento auto mechanic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2004 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
At a certain point in award-winning British playwright David Hare's newest political drama, based on the real characters and real events of the recent past, the audience is left aghast at the unreality of what is historically true. The United States is attacked. The chief author of those attacks escapes into the mountains. And the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, Michael Phillips is The Times' theater critic
"Angels in America" seems like a long time ago. Fueled by leftist outrage over Reagan-era social policies, Tony Kushner's Pulitzer Prize-winning play debuted at the Mark Taper Forum in 1992. Here was old-fashioned political engagement on a stage, light on its feet and ready to rumble.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore
HONG KONG - When Mabel Cheung, one of this city's leading directors, shot her historical-political drama "The Soong Sisters" in China in the mid-1990s, the nature of the exchange for the co-production was simple: Beijing provided inexpensive manpower, and professionals from the British colony's highly developed movie industry provided the expertise. Hong Kong cinema, after all, had been enjoying a golden age for close to two decades - celebrated directors such as John Woo and Wong Kar-wai had helped the city's filmmakers garner a global fan base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992
Kevin Phillips' analysis (Opinion, Aug. 2) of the Clinton candidacy as a significant change for the Democratic Party is right in this respect: The Democrats have nearly mastered the repackaging of their tax-and-spend ideals. This is a milestone for the Democrats. When they used to wear the self-sacrifice ideal as a badge, now Gov. Clinton and Sen. Al Gore thinly disguise it behind quotes from the Bible, a "New Covenant" and the shameless use of personal tragedy for political drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1997
The Grande 4-Plex in downtown Los Angeles will launch its "Cine Latino" series of four films, each screening one week only, on Friday with "Aventurera," the classic 1950 Mexican campy melodrama. It will continue March 14 with the Venezuelan political drama "Knocks at My Door," which will be followed on March 21 with "Tango Feroz," based on the life of a popular Argentine rock singer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
Writers on "The West Wing" aren't expected to begin grappling with how to deal with actor John Spencer's death until after the holidays. Spencer, 58, who played former White House chief of staff and now vice presidential candidate Leo McGarry in the political drama, died of a heart attack Friday.
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