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Political Drama

BOOKS
September 17, 1995 | RICHARDEDER
In the days when we were told stories and believed in them, "once upon a time" was a reassuring invocation. Reassuring because it meant that there would be a story and that it was about to begin, but also for another reason. It promised an ending down the way that was not a shattering of the story but part of it. "Once," with its mortality, was laid neatly "upon" the bosom of "time," which existed before and during, and would exist afterward.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1996 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Four years ago, veteran British actor Kenneth Cranham was getting ready for the opening of his first stage play in five years--"An Inspector Calls," at the Royal National Theatre--when he happened to run into an older colleague on the street. No sooner had the two thespians caught up with each other's activities than the elder man asked Cranham the question many in the London theater were surely wondering about, though they were perhaps too polite to ask.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2002 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Hollywood, conventional wisdom says you can't make movies about politics because no one cares enough to watch. In San Francisco, you can't hold a political race without everyone watching every minute. This election season's most captivating race here stars the daughter of a storied San Francisco politician and the son of a Sacramento auto mechanic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2004 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
At a certain point in award-winning British playwright David Hare's newest political drama, based on the real characters and real events of the recent past, the audience is left aghast at the unreality of what is historically true. The United States is attacked. The chief author of those attacks escapes into the mountains. And the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, Michael Phillips is The Times' theater critic
"Angels in America" seems like a long time ago. Fueled by leftist outrage over Reagan-era social policies, Tony Kushner's Pulitzer Prize-winning play debuted at the Mark Taper Forum in 1992. Here was old-fashioned political engagement on a stage, light on its feet and ready to rumble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan and David Zahniser
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti on Thursday set the stage for a potentially messy confrontation with the City Council, saying he would refuse to sign a proposed salary deal with the politically potent union representing Department of Water and Power workers. Local 18 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers ran a fierce campaign against Garcetti, whose main argument in the mayoral election in May was that he could be trusted to stand up for DWP ratepayers. In a written statement, Garcetti said the union-endorsed contract proposal included cost savings that were worth pursuing.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
Like a mid-season coaching hire for a losing ballclub, director Bennett Miller inherited an uphill battle when he was brought in as the director of a shaky project called "Moneyball," but he had two key players on his side — and both of them were named Brad Pitt. With its half-dozen Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild nominations, "Moneyball" is now viewed as a quality contender in the Oscar nomination race, but the sports-film-with-a-message was clearly a longshot project back when Miller stepped in following the summer 2009 departure of Steven Soderbergh, who had spent years developing the script.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2011 | By David Lauter, Washington Bureau
High-stakes negotiations force people to reveal what they really care about, and in the 11th-hour deal to stave off a federal financial default, President Obama and congressional Democrats and Republicans each made clear their top priorities. For Republicans, it was preventing any tax increase to upper-income families. For Democrats, it was ensuring no cuts to Social Security, Medicaid and a handful of other programs that aid the elderly and the poor. And for Obama, it was getting a deal that would end the threat of an economy-shaking default until after the 2012 presidential election.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012 | By Ben Fritz and Joe Flint
Netflix has acquired the exclusive U.S. rights to movies from Walt Disney Studios films, beginning in 2016, in a three-year deal that catapults the Internet video-on-demand service into direct competition with pay-TV giants such as HBO and Showtime. The news is a blow to the pay channel Starz, which previously had the rights to Disney movies, including its Pixar animated films and Marvel superhero pictures. Disney has also agreed to immediately give Netflix non-exclusive streaming rights to more of its older library titles including "Dumbo," "Pocahontas" and "Alice in Wonderland.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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