YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPolitical Drama

Political Drama

September 17, 1995 | RICHARDEDER
In the days when we were told stories and believed in them, "once upon a time" was a reassuring invocation. Reassuring because it meant that there would be a story and that it was about to begin, but also for another reason. It promised an ending down the way that was not a shattering of the story but part of it. "Once," with its mortality, was laid neatly "upon" the bosom of "time," which existed before and during, and would exist afterward.
In Hollywood, conventional wisdom says you can't make movies about politics because no one cares enough to watch. In San Francisco, you can't hold a political race without everyone watching every minute. This election season's most captivating race here stars the daughter of a storied San Francisco politician and the son of a Sacramento auto mechanic.
May 5, 1996 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Four years ago, veteran British actor Kenneth Cranham was getting ready for the opening of his first stage play in five years--"An Inspector Calls," at the Royal National Theatre--when he happened to run into an older colleague on the street. No sooner had the two thespians caught up with each other's activities than the elder man asked Cranham the question many in the London theater were surely wondering about, though they were perhaps too polite to ask.
September 15, 2004 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
At a certain point in award-winning British playwright David Hare's newest political drama, based on the real characters and real events of the recent past, the audience is left aghast at the unreality of what is historically true. The United States is attacked. The chief author of those attacks escapes into the mountains. And the U.S.
August 13, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, Michael Phillips is The Times' theater critic
"Angels in America" seems like a long time ago. Fueled by leftist outrage over Reagan-era social policies, Tony Kushner's Pulitzer Prize-winning play debuted at the Mark Taper Forum in 1992. Here was old-fashioned political engagement on a stage, light on its feet and ready to rumble.
July 24, 2008 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
There was a time when it was hard to find yellow warblers at Rush Creek. But on a recent bright and sunny morning, a yellow warbler plunged through a gap in a stream-side cottonwood forest, flying back to the nest where her chicks were hiding. Suddenly, she was stopped in midair, tangled in a mist net. Field biologist Chris McCreedy found the bird in his snare a few minutes later. "Hi there, sweetie," McCreedy said as he set to work.
August 10, 2010 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
Maywood, whose political marriage to the city of Bell made national headlines, is considering a quickie divorce. In late June, Maywood fired most of its workers and turned over operations to its neighbor city. But the scandal over eye-popping salaries in Bell has become a "distraction" and Maywood leaders say they may look for someone else to run their affairs. "We're caught in a situation where we need to move forward," said Maywood Councilman Felipe Aguirre. "We don't want to be distracted by things that are not germane to our city.
December 7, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
When Ronald Reagan was asked, as he periodically was, whether his experience as an actor had helped him to be an effective president, he'd genially respond that he didn't know how anybody could do the job without having been an actor. He was, Reagan biographer Lou Cannon believes, kidding on the square, and "Hyde Park on Hudson" amusingly demonstrates how important performance was for another head of state. Though Daniel Day-Lewis as Abraham Lincoln is the presidential presentation of the moment, Bill Murray as Franklin Delano Roosevelt is well worth paying attention to. His FDR beautifully conveys the notion of the chief executive as seductive star performer, a man who counted on his ever-appealing charm to get his way in matters both personal and professional.
January 12, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
If you serendipitously end up in an elevator with Steven Spielberg, make an impression. British actor David Thewlis did, though it may not have been quite the one he wanted. In 1994, Thewlis was leaving an award ceremony in New York after accepting a prize for his lead role in Mike Leigh's working-class dramedy "Naked. " He found himself riding down with Spielberg, who had just received an award for "Schindler's List," and the two had a brief, unremarkable exchange. But a few months later, Spielberg called him with an odd request: The director wanted Thewlis to play a man who turned into a dog. "Is it something about my character in 'Naked' that makes you think I'd be good in that?"
December 4, 2012 | By Ben Fritz and Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Netflix Inc. has acquired exclusive U.S. rights to movies from Walt Disney Studios in a deal that catapults the Internet video-on-demand service into direct competition with pay TV giants such as HBO and Showtime. The three-year agreement takes effect in 2016 and is a blow to the pay channel Starz, which currently has the rights to broadcast Disney movies, including its Pixar animated films and Marvel superhero pictures, about eight months after they are released in theaters. Starz's sole remaining movie provider is now Sony Pictures.
Los Angeles Times Articles