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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Claire Zulkey
Sketches about funny voices and the 2012 election dominated the opening of "Saturday Night Live's" 38 th season. Host Seth MacFarlane, creator and voice actor of “Family Guy” and “Ted,” tended to rely upon his vocal characters for most of his starring scenes (a dark sketch about a damaged puppet class attendee was arguably the most successful in terms of both humor and originality), although the host did take a stab at celebrity impression during a fond Weekend Update tweak at the genial dimness of Olympics star Ryan Lochte.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | Meredith Blake
The first “Saturday Night Live Weekend Update Thursday” aired last night on NBC, continuing an election year tradition that began in 2008. The first show kicked off last night with a sketch about - what else? - Mitt Romney's “47%” videotape and the determined efforts by the perky hosts at “Fox & Friends” to downplay the nominee's comments.    Naturally, in the “SNL” version of the undercover videotape, Jason Sudeikis' Romney puts things in even starker terms than his real-life counterpart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1994 | N.F. MENDOZA
Talk show meets public affairs show when Jay Leno appears in a round-table discussion on political humor on NBC's "Meet the Press," Sunday at 7 a.m. on Channels 4, 36 and 39. Comedy takes the stage tonight at 8 when NBC presents "Bob Hope's Birthday Memories," celebrating the comedian's 91st birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Claire Zulkey
Sketches about funny voices and the 2012 election dominated the opening of "Saturday Night Live's" 38 th season. Host Seth MacFarlane, creator and voice actor of “Family Guy” and “Ted,” tended to rely upon his vocal characters for most of his starring scenes (a dark sketch about a damaged puppet class attendee was arguably the most successful in terms of both humor and originality), although the host did take a stab at celebrity impression during a fond Weekend Update tweak at the genial dimness of Olympics star Ryan Lochte.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Did you hear the one about President Chun Doo Hwan and four other guys in a submarine? You will here, along with variations involving a lifeboat and an airplane. But there is not a lot of political humor in South Korea, mainly because there has not been a lot of politics in nearly four decades of independence. The targets have been few, and skins have been thin.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2000 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, Paul Brownfield is a Times staff writer
Some of the best coverage of the Republican and Democratic national conventions came not from a news source, but from a fake one--Comedy Central's "The Daily Show." For two weeks, the cable series hosted by Jon Stewart dispatched its straight-faced correspondents onto the convention floors in Philadelphia and Los Angeles, and mocked leaders, delegates, the news media--and most of all the notion that something of social import was actually taking place. It was all a lot of fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Washington, D.C., won't have Clinton to kick around on Inauguration Day--Kate Clinton, that is. The comedian (no relation to Bill), whose biting political commentary resounds from stages across the country to the news desks at CNN, will kick off her 20th year in show biz at the Long Beach Center Theatre on Saturday, coincidentally coinciding with festivities in the nation's capital. "It was either come to Long Beach or get some bail money together and go to D.C.
WORLD
August 23, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Shortly before his 2004 suicide, the wry American monologist Spalding Gray was asked after a New York show how his humor was received overseas. He recalled a presentation he'd recently given in Europe that hadn't received a single chuckle over a two-hour period — ouch! — after which he'd overheard two audience members remark, "My, those Americans sure like talking about themselves. " Humor may be easily lost in translation, but sociologists, artists and political pundits say it also offers insight into how an individual or society sees itself.
WORLD
November 18, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Every week, Kim Ou-joon does what was once unthinkable in South Korea: He gleefully lampoons the president. At the start of a recent installment of Kim's wildly popular political podcast, "Naneun Ggomsuda," or "I'm a Weasel," the narrator intoned with mock-solemnity: "Wall Street is occupied by protesters while Korea is peaceful and quiet. That's natural because Korea is heaven on earth! "Our president can cross the river on a bridge of fallen autumn leaves. " Next, listeners heard the name of President Lee Myung-bak repeated in a series of goofy vocal stylings that alternately imitated Alvin the Chipmunk, whining children and, finally, Bela Lugosi.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1997
Steve Hammel's commentary on the vicious nature of current political humor hits the nail on the head. Humor once considered too gross or "blue" for network TV is now freely directed at President Clinton and his character, not to mention that of Hillary and Chelsea Clinton. In particular, nightly references by David Letterman to the president's sexual, eating and personal habits frequently cross the line of decency. If we are to expect politicians to clean up their acts regarding "dirty" campaigns, maybe we ought to start with our political humor.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Monday night on "The Daily Show," Jon Stewart bid a reluctant goodbye to Herman Cain, the Republican presidential candidate who has provided his show with a nearly endless stream of material over the last two months, with Stewart suggesting that his show's writers are more unhappy with Cain's decision to pull out of the race than Cain's supporters. "I'm gonna miss him so much," Stewart said. PHOTOS: Political scandals and gaffes of 2011 Stewart also delved into one of the greatest mysteries still surrounding Cain's imploded campaign: Why the now ex-contender seemed so preoccupied with a passage from a Donna Summer song from 12-year-old Pokemon movie.
WORLD
November 18, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Every week, Kim Ou-joon does what was once unthinkable in South Korea: He gleefully lampoons the president. At the start of a recent installment of Kim's wildly popular political podcast, "Naneun Ggomsuda," or "I'm a Weasel," the narrator intoned with mock-solemnity: "Wall Street is occupied by protesters while Korea is peaceful and quiet. That's natural because Korea is heaven on earth! "Our president can cross the river on a bridge of fallen autumn leaves. " Next, listeners heard the name of President Lee Myung-bak repeated in a series of goofy vocal stylings that alternately imitated Alvin the Chipmunk, whining children and, finally, Bela Lugosi.
WORLD
August 23, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Shortly before his 2004 suicide, the wry American monologist Spalding Gray was asked after a New York show how his humor was received overseas. He recalled a presentation he'd recently given in Europe that hadn't received a single chuckle over a two-hour period — ouch! — after which he'd overheard two audience members remark, "My, those Americans sure like talking about themselves. " Humor may be easily lost in translation, but sociologists, artists and political pundits say it also offers insight into how an individual or society sees itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010
SERIES Ghost Whisperer: Melinda (Jennifer Love Hewitt) tries to help Ned (Christoph Sanders) stop a ghost out for revenge at the Grandview radio station after the station broadcasts humiliating secrets. Aidan Lucas guest stars in the new episode (8 p.m. CBS). Medium: The ghost of a suspected murderer contacts Allison hoping to clear his name in this new episode (9 p.m. CBS). Shark Tank: The unscripted series returns with a full slate of entrepreneurs pitching their ideas in hopes of obtaining funds from the resident moguls.
OPINION
January 15, 2007 | Fadoua Benaich and Jesse Sage, FADOUA BENAICH is a Moroccan journalist based in Washington. JESSE SAGE directs the HAMSA project of the American Islamic Congress.
THE ONLY REAL DANGER to a political joke in the United States is missing your mark. Just ask John Kerry. Although Americans can make light of their leaders, their enemies and even the Iraq war, a fundamental challenge to freedom of expression is happening just off our radar screen in Morocco. There, two of the country's leading journalists face five-year prison sentences, crippling fines and/or being banned from publication, all for an article about political humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2005 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
In the picture, residents of New Orleans make their way through waist-deep water as President Bush stands next to his father, grinning and displaying a striped bass that he's just caught. "Bush's vacation" is the caption of the photographic gag that has made its way around the Internet this week. In another doctored photo, the president strums a guitar and appears to be serenading a weeping African American woman holding a baby in front of the Louisiana Superdome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1992
When Dan Quayle attacked the "Hollywood elite," the reaction of the American public was something between a sigh and a groan. When the "Hollywood elite" struck back during the Emmy Awards, the reaction of the American public--and, for that matter, of the Emmy audience itself--was something between a groan and a yawn. Thanks to the vice president's post-Emmy counterattack, we now know that his sister, presumably a Republican, is a divorced and struggling single mother.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Monday night on "The Daily Show," Jon Stewart bid a reluctant goodbye to Herman Cain, the Republican presidential candidate who has provided his show with a nearly endless stream of material over the last two months, with Stewart suggesting that his show's writers are more unhappy with Cain's decision to pull out of the race than Cain's supporters. "I'm gonna miss him so much," Stewart said. PHOTOS: Political scandals and gaffes of 2011 Stewart also delved into one of the greatest mysteries still surrounding Cain's imploded campaign: Why the now ex-contender seemed so preoccupied with a passage from a Donna Summer song from 12-year-old Pokemon movie.
NEWS
November 23, 2001 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"A laugh a day is as good as eating a juicy lamb chop," goes an old Turkish adage. As Turks struggle with a severe economic crisis, few can afford meat these days, but many are laughing at their own woes thanks to a cheeky political cartoon magazine called LeMan. No subject is too sacred or sensitive for the biting pen strokes of Turkey's most widely circulated weekly: not the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in the U.S., nor militant Islam, nor police repression of Turkey's ethnic Kurds.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Washington, D.C., won't have Clinton to kick around on Inauguration Day--Kate Clinton, that is. The comedian (no relation to Bill), whose biting political commentary resounds from stages across the country to the news desks at CNN, will kick off her 20th year in show biz at the Long Beach Center Theatre on Saturday, coincidentally coinciding with festivities in the nation's capital. "It was either come to Long Beach or get some bail money together and go to D.C.
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