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NEWS
August 12, 1992 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Prodded by President Bush's reelection campaign, GOP platform drafters changed their minds Tuesday and decided to call the controversial 1990 tax increase agreed to by Bush "recessionary" instead of "a mistake." Some Bush campaign strategists apparently feared that Democrats would use the "mistake" phrasing adopted in Monday's platform draft against the President, even though Bush himself has used similar language in describing his decision to approve the tax hike.
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NEWS
August 15, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Is the White House deliberately sending mixed messages on abortion? After hammering down a staunchly anti-abortion plank in their party platform, GOP leaders have awakened the last few days to find Barbara Bush questioning their work and the President himself saying he would support a grandchild who opted to have an abortion.
NEWS
August 14, 1992 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
A party platform that provoked outrage among abortion rights advocates but won cheers from conservative activists was given its finishing touches Thursday by a Republican drafting committee. In the past, the platform has taken a hard line against abortion. Dissenters had hoped that this year's manifesto would at least acknowledge room for diversity on the issue.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | JOHN BRENNAN, TIMES POLL DIRECTOR
Given the heat the issue continually generates, one might conclude that Americans are in two rigidly defined armed camps on the abortion question, an abortion rights group and an anti-abortion wing, each poised for a fight to the death on the electoral battlefield. Such categories may accurately portray abortion militants. But they don't describe the complex, contradictory views held by most voters on the subject.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Republicans from around the nation headed toward Houston on Saturday for a national convention they hope will begin to revive their party's flagging political fortunes, President Bush indicated that he will soon offer new proposals for helping the beleaguered economy. "I'll be making some proposals regarding the economy . . . that I think will take care of it," Bush said in an interview with Time magazine that was released Saturday.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | CONNIE STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after he lost the Democratic presidential primary in his home state, a relaxed, almost jovial Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. pledged to hammer out a "people's platform" for his party and to keep working to give ordinary folks a stake in the political process. The former California governor also predicted that the California Senate race between liberal Democrat Barbara Boxer and conservative Republican Bruce Herschensohn will highlight what can be at stake in an election.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ross Perot, outlining how he would mend the U.S. economy, proposes a combination of tax cuts and loans for small business and tougher trade policy to create more jobs at home. "We cannot be a superpower if we cannot manufacture here," the Texas billionaire said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. He called for the United States to make almost everything it needs at home. "We have to manufacture here," he said.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent preemptive strike before President Bush's prime time news conference, businessman Ross Perot told a gathering of supporters Thursday that his undeclared presidential candidacy already has changed the political landscape of the nation. "Three months ago, I was worried nobody'd listen," Perot told a crowd in Las Vegas. "Now they've all got hearing aids. It's just really fascinating, isn't it, that suddenly we've got the President of the United States interested in a balanced budget."
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