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Political Prisoners South Africa

NEWS
November 25, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The government Thursday eased restrictions on black nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela, moved the reprieved Sharpeville Six from death row and hanged six other blacks convicted of murder.
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NEWS
September 1, 1988
South African prison authorities said black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela had been moved from Cape Town's state-run Tygerberg Hospital to a private clinic. A statement said the condition of Mandela, who is being treated for tuberculosis, had improved so that treatment at the hospital is no longer necessary, and he was moved to Constantiaberg clinic for after-care. The move revived speculation that Mandela might soon be freed, or at least be allowed more freedom to receive visitors.
NEWS
February 16, 1989
The South African Council of Churches called on the sickest of about 250 hunger-striking detainees to suspend their fast amid increasing signs that the government may be preparing to release a large number of the activists held without charge. The council's recommendation, which is likely to be widely observed, was aimed at preventing irreversible medical damage to the protesters, some of whom are in their 23rd day of fasting.
NEWS
November 6, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Black nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela's autobiography will be published early next year, South Africa's largest newspaper reported. The Sunday Times said the book was secretly written by the African National Congress leader during his 27 years in prison and that the manuscript has been smuggled out. Its publication may be timed to coincide with Mandela's release, it said. Mandela's lawyer is believed to be negotiating with U.S.
NEWS
October 6, 1989
The South African government will free jailed black leader Walter Sisulu but is irritated by Western pressure to negotiate with his African National Congress guerrilla movement, news reports said. Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha criticized comments this week by U.S. State Department official Herman J. Cohen, who said he expects the white-minority government to legalize outlawed groups and begin talks with them within nine months. Sisulu, 77, was sentenced in 1964 along with Nelson R.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | From Reuters
Police have assaulted scores of South African political detainees, including children, who are being held under a national state of emergency, the opposition Progressive Federal Party said Wednesday. Helen Suzman, party spokeswoman on law and order, told Parliament that sworn affidavits from one district of Natal province alone contained the names of 119 people, two of them aged 15 and 12, who said they had been assaulted by police.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Anglican and Catholic bishops led a dawn procession of 600 worshipers, many carrying wooden crosses, through downtown Durban on Friday to pray for the release of South Africa's thousands of political detainees. The multiracial procession, led by Catholic Archbishop Denis E.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | WILLIAM CLAIBORNE, The Washington Post
The government Saturday made it illegal for any person to call--either orally or in writing--for the release of security prisoners detained without charges, or even to display "disapproval" of such detentions. Legal advisers said the regulations could be interpreted to forbid public prayers for those detained.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Archbishop Desmond Tutu defied new government regulations Monday by urging South Africans to join with him in calling for the release of the thousands of political detainees imprisoned here without trial. Tutu was joined by other Catholic, Protestant and Jewish religious leaders in a dramatic challenge to South Africa's white-led minority government.
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