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Political Prisoners South Africa

NEWS
February 16, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT and JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Nelson R. Mandela spoke earnestly here of his desire to allay white fears of a black government, 10,000 right-wing whites marched through the streets of Pretoria on Thursday to decry the black nationalist leader's freedom. "The New South Africa: Farewell Whites," proclaimed one of the placards above the crowd, some of whom chanted: "Hang Mandela!" The white-led protest, a rarity before President Frederik W.
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NEWS
February 16, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day Nelson Mandela walked through her front door 41 years ago, Fatima Meer was a young student. And she was swiftly charmed by the tall, striking figure of this well-dressed lawyer. "I must admit that I sort of responded to his physicality rather than his intellect at first," Meer says, remembering that initial meeting at her parents' house near Durban. "He's a very good-looking person."
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesse Jackson and his 17-member entourage tore across South Africa on a fact-finding mission for five days last week, delightedly mugging for the cameras, pressing flesh in the townships, embracing black liberation heroes and making all the local newspapers. But Thursday, after spending the days since Sunday in the publicity shadow cast by black nationalist leader Nelson R.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Freed nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela, who the government warns may be a target of left- as well as right-wing extremists, is being protected during his early days of freedom by aides guarding the schedule of his movements and even, occasionally and at discreet distances, by contingents of white South African police. But his security arrangements have been complicated by his urgent desire to speak to his followers.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | From Reuters
The Rev. Jesse Jackson on Monday compared South African President Frederik W. de Klerk to Abraham Lincoln on the 181st anniversary of the birth of the Great Emancipator. The U.S. civil rights leader praised De Klerk for freeing Nelson R. Mandela from prison and legalizing the African National Congress. "This was a courageous step for President De Klerk," Jackson told reporters at the Cape Town Press Club.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration has no plans to lift U.S. sanctions against South Africa, President Bush indicated Monday, deflecting pressure from some conservatives who argue that the Pretoria government deserves a concrete reward for its racial policy reforms. "I'm bound by the law" to maintain the sanctions until the South African government meets additional conditions, Bush said in a press conference.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson R. Mandela, patiently answering questions from reporters under a shade tree, said Monday that he has been "completely overwhelmed by the enthusiasm" of South Africans' welcome after 27 years in prison. "It is something I did not expect," said the 71-year-old leader, sitting with his wife at his side on his first full day of freedom. "I must confess that I am unable to describe my emotions. It was breathtaking, that's all I can say."
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 27-year wait for a glimpse of Nelson R. Mandela grew frenzied Monday as school classrooms emptied in black townships around Johannesburg and about 35,000 people showed up at a soccer stadium in Soweto to welcome home the black nationalist leader. But the guest of honor didn't show up.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun rose hot on this black township Sunday morning, but its people did not. After a night of joyous celebrations following the news of Nelson R. Mandela's impending release, no one, it seems, had even gone to sleep. By early morning, this suburban Cape Town settlement was teeming with activity on a day usually reserved for quiet rest and church-going. The scene here and in the neighboring Nyanga township was anything but tranquil.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush telephoned Nelson R. Mandela from the White House on Sunday, told him all Americans "were rejoicing at his release" after 27 years in South Africa's prisons and personally invited him to the White House. "He told me that he wanted to consult some of his colleagues, but that he expected he would be able to accept my invitation," the President told reporters in the Rose Garden late Sunday afternoon. "It was a very friendly conversation," Bush said.
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