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Political Prisoners South Korea

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1992 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two hundred Korean human rights advocates from major U.S. cities, Europe, Japan, South Korea and Australia converged Friday on Los Angeles' Koreatown to publicize what they say are rampant human rights violations in South Korea. "The South Korean government puts on a democratic face to the world, but inside Korea, it's business as usual," said Minn Chung during a noontime rally in front of the South Korean Consulate in the Mid-Wilshire district.
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NEWS
September 18, 1998 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"To My Dear Mother, who must be hanging her head down low not finding my name on the list on the prison wall, who must be lonelier now than at any time before . . . not being able to touch my hand." Cho Soon Sun, 73, choked on her son's words as she recited them to the small crowd gathered in the park. The letter from Kang Yong Ju tried to explain why he had chosen to remain in his prison cell rather than answer the government's simple questions about how he would obey the law if freed.
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NEWS
February 27, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Declaring its intent to promote national reconciliation, President Roh Tae Woo's Cabinet approved an amnesty Friday that freed 125 political prisoners today but left 80 others, including the most prominent one, in prison. The amnesty, Roh's first act since assuming office Thursday, freed 2,134 prisoners of all categories, and affected a total of 7,234 people, including criminals and former prisoners whose civil rights will be restored.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
Dozens of political prisoners were freed Friday as part of a sweeping amnesty by South Korean President Kim Dae Jung, who was once jailed for his beliefs. Human rights groups said, however, that the clemency left several key political prisoners behind bars. "We are very disappointed," said Minkahyup, one of the groups. It noted that the amnesty, which affected 5.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Opposition leader Kim Young Sam on Monday demanded that all political prisoners in South Korea, including those accused of being Communist organizers, be released from prison by Friday. He declared that unless this is done, President Chun Doo Hwan's recent announcement of sweeping democratic reforms would amount to nothing more than "a fraud and a handout."
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Kim Young Sam granted amnesty today to more than 40,000 people--including 5,800 punished for political crimes--to clear away the "shadows over our society" left by previous military regimes. It was the largest amnesty in South Korean history and included the release from jail of dissident leader Moon Ik Kwan, 73, dozens of activist students, and six people held since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War for spying for Communist North Korea.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attempt to forge a new chapter in relations on the divided Korean peninsula appeared headed toward the same old impasse as the prime ministers of North and South Korea prepared to hold a second day of talks today. The ball was arguably in the Seoul government's court. Success of the talks may hinge on how well the South Korean side can respond to key demands by the North that it consider joint entry into the United Nations, cease military maneuvers with U.S.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first round of historic talks between senior officials of North and South Korea ended on a relatively upbeat note Thursday, with each side hinting at compromise in two areas where bitter disagreements have traditionally soured relations--U.N. membership and family exchanges. No major agreement was announced after the close of the second day of deliberations between the prime ministers of each country and high-ranking political and military delegates.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo met with his top advisers as the country's unrest showed no sign of abating. News reports said a Cabinet shake-up and a release of political prisoners were imminent. Anti-government rallies have spread to more than 75 cities.
NEWS
December 21, 1988 | Associated Press
The South Korean government announced an amnesty Tuesday for 2,015 of its political enemies but warned that tough measures will be enforced to restore law and order. "I want to emphasize that the act of clemency is coupled with the administration's unflinching determination to speedily restore the weakened public confidence in the law-enforcement authority of the state," said Prime Minister Kang Young Hoon.
NEWS
March 13, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most sweeping pardon in South Korean history, President Kim Dae Jung, a former political prisoner, today announced an amnesty for 5.5 million South Koreans. For the first time in history, the pardon was extended to some--though not all--of the prisoners who refuse to renounce their Communist ideology or loyalty to North Korea. More than 5 million of those being pardoned are people convicted of drunken driving, check-bouncing and other such offenses.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Kim Young Sam granted amnesty today to more than 40,000 people--including 5,800 punished for political crimes--to clear away the "shadows over our society" left by previous military regimes. It was the largest amnesty in South Korean history and included the release from jail of dissident leader Moon Ik Kwan, 73, dozens of activist students, and six people held since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War for spying for Communist North Korea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1992 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two hundred Korean human rights advocates from major U.S. cities, Europe, Japan, South Korea and Australia converged Friday on Los Angeles' Koreatown to publicize what they say are rampant human rights violations in South Korea. "The South Korean government puts on a democratic face to the world, but inside Korea, it's business as usual," said Minn Chung during a noontime rally in front of the South Korean Consulate in the Mid-Wilshire district.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo met with his top advisers as the country's unrest showed no sign of abating. News reports said a Cabinet shake-up and a release of political prisoners were imminent. Anti-government rallies have spread to more than 75 cities.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first round of historic talks between senior officials of North and South Korea ended on a relatively upbeat note Thursday, with each side hinting at compromise in two areas where bitter disagreements have traditionally soured relations--U.N. membership and family exchanges. No major agreement was announced after the close of the second day of deliberations between the prime ministers of each country and high-ranking political and military delegates.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attempt to forge a new chapter in relations on the divided Korean peninsula appeared headed toward the same old impasse as the prime ministers of North and South Korea prepared to hold a second day of talks today. The ball was arguably in the Seoul government's court. Success of the talks may hinge on how well the South Korean side can respond to key demands by the North that it consider joint entry into the United Nations, cease military maneuvers with U.S.
NEWS
March 6, 1988
Protesters in Seoul hurled rocks and firebombs at police during a rally to protest South Korea's imprisonment of anti-government dissidents. Police fired tear gas to disperse the crowd. "Release all prisoners of conscience!" shouted the protesters, who denounced President Roh Tae Woo, sworn in nine days ago. There were no reports of arrests or injuries. The protesters were among 1,000 people who took part in a 3-hour rally at Yonsei University calling for the release of the prisoners.
NEWS
July 4, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writers
For Kim Kee Joon, there is still no democracy in South Korea. Kim awoke Friday morning to learn that her son, a 25-year-old "prisoner of conscience," will not be among the political prisoners that President Chun Doo Hwan's government plans to release in its promised wave of democratic reforms.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Opposition leader Kim Dae Jung, indicted in a national security case, said Saturday that he will try to rally South Korea's splintered opposition forces for a new campaign to push government reforms. Kim, head of the Party for Peace and Democracy, said his indictment Friday "is tantamount to the government of (President) Roh Tae Woo declaring it has given up its willingness to carry out reforms toward democracy." "There are over 900 political prisoners in jail.
NEWS
May 9, 1989
South Korean authorities seized a dissident leader and ordered the arrests of 90 other activists in a crackdown on violent protests by leftist radicals. Police announced the arrest of Lee Chang Bok, a leader of the nation's main dissident alliance, the United National Democratic Movement. Officials said that Lee, 51, had supported Communist North Korea and organized strikes and violent demonstrations. Later, police authorized the nationwide roundup of 90 students, workers and others involved in anti-government strikes and protests.
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