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NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Jeb Bush, drawing fire for suggesting that the current Republican Party would have been hostile not just to his father, but to President Reagan as well, took to Twitter  on Tuesday to clarify his remarks. “The point I was making yesterday is this: The political system today is hyperpartisan. Both sides are at fault,” he said. “My dad & Reagan sacrificed political points for good public policy.” "Back to my dad's time and Ronald Reagan's time - they got a lot of stuff done with a lot of bipartisan support," Bush said Monday  during a meeting with the Bloomberg staff in New York City.
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OPINION
December 18, 2013
Re "The Manhunt," five-part series, Dec. 8, 10, 12, 13 and 15 Tell me, please, your reasons for devoting thousands of words to the search last February for former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner? With children around the world dying every day of preventable causes; with the millions of people in this country suffering the effects of homelessness and absolute poverty; with the corporate pillaging of the Earth and its resources; with the for-profit gouging of consumers and taxpayers by oil, drug, insurance, weapons and financial institutions; with the collapse of the infrastructure in Los Angeles and elsewhere; and with the rampant corruption in our political system, do you really need to spend such a spectacular amount of effort recounting the admittedly heroic effort to hunt down and kill Dorner?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1996
Appointment of bipartisan commissions to resolve intransigent governmental problems was a commendable element of agreement between Bill Clinton and Bob Dole during the campaign. It should be applied to reinventing a creaky political system which produced the choice between an aging, unfocused challenger and a younger incumbent who specializes in stretching the truth. America deserves better. WILLIAM T. LYNDE
WORLD
March 5, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- With three humble bows to the audience, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao exited the public stage in an anticlimactic end to his ten-year reign. In his final work report at the opening of the National People's Congress, nary a word was spoken about political reform, which Wen had championed in earlier speeches. Instead, he read a 100-minute statement that was dull even by the standards of the country's soporific political theater. Both Wen and Hu Jintao, the president, will step down by the end of the 12-day session to make way for a new leadership headed by Xi Jinping, already secretary of the Communist Party, and incoming premier Li Keqiang.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1989 | MIKE MOCHIZUKI, Mike Mochizuki is on the faculty of the School of International Relations at USC. and
There is nothing new about Japanese politicians having mistresses. Why then has Prime Minister Sosuke Uno's affair with a geisha plunged the ruling Liberal Democratic Party into its deepest crisis since it was formed in 1955? For one thing, the expose has upset party plans for surmounting the Recruit scandal. Although Uno's selection as prime minister did not receive enthusiastic support within the party, it was hoped that he would restore the Liberal Democrats' tarnished image.
OPINION
December 13, 2007
Re "An ecumenical omelet," editorial, Dec. 8 The editorial misses the point. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney delivered a history lesson to the evangelical right on the meaning of freedom in America. Unlike many commentators, Romney does not believe religion has no bearing on politics. The dream of the total exclusion of religious values from political discourse is unrealistic. The issue is how to deploy one's religion without excluding the religion of others.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | Reuters
Saying France's motto, "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity," falls short of reality, 10 female politicians launched a campaign Thursday to feminize the country's male-dominated political system through a constitutional amendment. France gave women the right to vote as late as 1945 and trails other European nations in its proportion of women in Parliament, according to official figures.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexicans are voting today in a presidential election widely expected to be the nation's cleanest and most democratic ever. But, in a worrying development, a significant part of the population anticipates fraud--and many appear willing to take to the streets if their candidate loses. A recent national poll by the Mexico City daily Reforma found that one out of four respondents believed that the election results will not be credible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1986 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Mexico today is facing its greatest economic and political challenges in more than half a century, but a collapse of the nation's embattled political system is very unlikely, a leading expert in U.S.-Mexican relations said Thursday. Buffeted by a $100-billion foreign debt, the collapse of world oil prices, 100% inflation and the effects of the catastrophic earthquake of 1985, Mexico this year experienced its lowest economic point since the midst of the Great Depression, according to Wayne A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1992
It is a little difficult to declare oneself a patriot these days without running the risk of being considered under the influence of euphoriants. To be sure, unthinking patriotism needs always to be eyed with great suspicion--exploitative patriotism being well known as the last refuge of the scoundrel. And, certainly, all is not well in America. Job layoffs and hiring freezes tell us that.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - In a swift and simple ceremony at the White House, President Obama was sworn in for a second term on Sunday and embarked on another four years leading a nation hobbled by a weak economy and gripped by political division. With his family at his side and his hand on his wife's family Bible, the 44th president began the new term on an understated note, repeating the oath of office in a private ceremony the day before a more lavish, public reenactment. The intimate event was an adherence to tradition prompted by a quirk of the calendar.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2013 | By David Horsey
Revolutionary changes are coming at us at supersonic speed, bringing new challenges that are existential and global. Yet our political system seems incapable of adapting to, or even fully acknowledging, those changes. Instead, the system is constricted by ideas and attitudes better suited to the 19th century. In the current issue of Vanity Fair, Todd Purdum equates the current era with the decades before and after 1500 during which the New World was discovered and explored, trade became a global enterprise, the Reformation broke the religious monopoly of the Roman Catholic Church, the feudal system gave way to nation states and movable type and the printing press created the first form of mass communication.
OPINION
December 26, 2012
Re "Firm lobbies, wins state work," Dec. 23 Deloitte Consulting invested (the polite term) $2.2 million in the California political system over the last 10 years and has won contracts worth more than $540 million over that time. Hundreds of millions of those dollars were for projects that were either over budget or abandoned. Deloitte's chump-change investment earned a return of at least 24,545%. To those voters who think public financing of elections is too expensive, I say, think again.
OPINION
December 18, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
On Friday, in his moving and heartfelt statement in response to the horrific shootings in Newtown, Conn., President Obama said, "As a country, we have been through this too many times…. And we're going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics. " He's right about so much here, but so wrong about one thing. In a democracy, politics is a synonym for "democracy. " It is through politics that people with strong feelings and interests peaceably hash out their disagreements.
OPINION
November 8, 2012 | By Timothy Garton Ash
In the same week it is revealed to us who will be the next leaders of both superpowers: Barack Obama and Xi Jinping. The only difference is that we didn't know it would be Obama until after Tuesday's vote. By contrast, we knew it would be Xi long before the process that begins in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Nov. 8, from which he will emerge as Communist Party leader, becoming president next spring. The coincidence prompts two questions: Which superpower is getting stronger?
NATIONAL
October 23, 2012 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Rep. Pete Stark, dean of California's congressional delegation, arrived in the House when Richard Nixon occupied the White House and John McCain was in a POW camp. Now, at age 80, Stark, one of Congress' most liberal and outspoken Democrats, faces perhaps the toughest campaign since he was first elected 40 years ago. Eric Swalwell, his aggressive 31-year-old challenger in a new East San Francisco Bay district, is taking a page out of the playbook Stark used in 1972 to oust fellow Democrat George P. Miller, the then 81-year-old dean of the California delegation: It's time for change.
OPINION
January 22, 1995 | Political forecast interviews conducted by Therese K. Lee
Can Mexico's economic and political problems be solved within the existing political framework? The Times asked seven experts on Mexico. Homero Aridjis President of the Mexico-based Environmental Group of the 100 The traditional way of the Mexican political system is not working. The (peso) crisis is an economic earthquake whose epicenter is the poor. Policies have been decided without taking the people into account.
WORLD
September 28, 2012 | By Barbara Demick and Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - By expelling renegade Politburo member Bo Xilai from the Communist Party and referring him for prosecution on offenses including bribery and sexual misconduct, China's leadership took decisive action to conclude a six-month scandal that shook the top echelons of power. Even though the struggle over Bo's fate took place largely behind closed doors, the damage is apparent. And it is far from clear that a new generation of leaders to be anointed at a party congress now set to begin Nov. 8 will find it easy to put it behind.
OPINION
September 18, 2012
Re "At 1 year, Occupy's effect is still hard to gauge," Sept. 15 It is unrealistic to expect that the Occupy movement could achieve a "broad tangible result" in one year against a deeply entrenched and utterly corrupt political system. Many people work inside the existing political parties in the hope that change can be achieved this way. The Occupy movement is working to change the corrupt system by acting from the outside. We in the movement realize that is a very difficult process that could take many years to show results.
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