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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2007 | Duke Helfand and Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke publicly for the first time Monday about the breakup of his 20-year marriage, saying he was responsible for the split even as he refused to talk about what caused it. In a somber meeting with reporters at City Hall, Villaraigosa declined to answer questions about whether the break with his wife, Corina, was triggered by another romantic relationship.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Christopher Hubbart has had a hard time trying to find a place to live, and no wonder. He's a serial rapist who assaulted women in the 1970s and '80s, was convicted and released, only to rape again. He was committed indefinitely to a mental facility until such time as he was determined by authorities to no longer be a threat. There was such a determination last summer, and it was upheld by a California court, but Hubbart waited while officials hunted for a place in Los Angeles County where he could live.
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NEWS
February 24, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the acts of executive clemency that President Clinton granted as he was leaving the White House, few strike as close to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton as her husband's decision to reduce the prison terms of four New York Hasidic Jews convicted of bilking tens of millions of dollars from the government. Sen. Clinton, New York's Democratic junior senator, has said that in general she was a bystander while President Clinton made his decisions on clemency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
It's rather refreshing that the next California Assembly Speaker spent her early years in a house with no indoor plumbing. Her family carried in water from a spring for drinking, cooking and washing. For a bathroom, they trekked to an outhouse. Assemblywoman Toni Atkins' father was a coal and lead miner; her mother a seamstress. The parents and their four kids crammed themselves into a little four-room house in rural southern Virginia. So when the Democrat, a San Diego transplant, talks about poor people and their housing needs, she isn't just whistling Dixie.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
For anyone interested in the politics of left and right -- and in political journalism as it is practiced at the highest level -- George Orwell's works are indispensable. This week, in the year marking the 110th anniversary of his birth, we present a personal list of his five greatest essays.   The winner and still champ, Orwell's "Politics and the English Language"  stands as the finest deconstruction of slovenly writing since Mark Twain's " Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses . " Orwell's essay, published in 1946 in Cyril Connolly's literary review Horizon, is not as sarcastic or funny as Twain's, but unlike Twain, Orwell makes the connection between degraded language and political deceit (at both ends of the political spectrum)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - A court overseer has halted inmate patient admissions at California's newest prison amid reports that the sprawling medical facility is beset by problems, including the unanswered calls of a dying patient. After meeting last week with corrections officials, Clark Kelso, the court-appointed medical receiver, ordered admissions stopped at the 6-month-old California Health Care Facility in Stockton and the opening of an adjacent 1,133-bed prison facility put on hold. In a report to federal courts Friday, Kelso said the prison's inability to provide adequate medical and hygiene supplies and unsanitary conditions "likely contributed to an outbreak of scabies.
OPINION
November 7, 2012
Re "Keeping politics out of the pulpit," Editorial, Nov. 5 Today I consider myself a freelance Catholic. I still go to Mass daily because I really enjoy the experience, but that's about it. I don't want anything to do with the organization. Two quotes from your editorial - one in which a Roman Catholic bishop says those who enable the destruction of life also reject Jesus, and another from a bishop who suggested that hellfire awaits those who vote the wrong way - are particularly egregious but typical of present-day Catholic hierarchical thinking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1999
Politics is the art of compromise: First your principles, then your constituency and then your country. Not always, but all too often. RUSS TRAVIS Bakersfield
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2010 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
The Legislature is about to decide whether to allow a colleague to become the first Republican Latino to hold statewide office in 135 years. But more important questions also will be answered: Can the Legislature's Democratic majority vote for a Republican? Can Democratic Latinos vote for a potentially rival Republican Latino? Can Republican conservatives vote for one of the Legislature's very rare Republican moderates? In short, can this Legislature behave in a bipartisan manner?
OPINION
July 17, 2013
Re "Foes of border bill focus on House," July 14 I chuckle when I see advocates of curbing immigration attacked for not being truly conservative. We're also attacked as just racists for not being truly liberal supporters of workers and the environment. In reality, immigration cuts across political lines. Some fiscal conservatives want mass immigration for cheap labor. Some social liberals want mass immigration for diversity or to help poor and oppressed foreigners. By contrast, some cultural conservatives want less immigration to preserve America from an unassimilable human wave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
Setting the stage for a shake-up in city politics, a councilman and a real estate investor held off heavily favored Assemblywoman Bonnie Lowenthal in Long Beach's mayoral election and will meet in a June runoff. Unofficial tallies in Tuesday's vote showed Councilman Robert Garcia leading the pack with 25.4% of the vote, and former NFL player and real estate investor Damon Dunn close behind with 22.3%. Lowenthal, a political heavyweight in the port city, garnered 19.6%. It marked the first time in her lengthy career that she lost an election day contest.
OPINION
April 4, 2014
Re "Campaign donor limits grow looser," April 3 Whatever one's politics, we all should be concerned about the corrosive influence of big money on government. More than 100 years ago, Teddy Roosevelt had to struggle with political bosses to get elected and pass reforms. Today's bosses are billionaires who spend millions to influence our politics. The Supreme Court's most recent decision on campaign money (reasoning that political contributions are protected free speech) furthers the sale of our democracy to the highest bidder.
OPINION
April 4, 2014 | By Timothy Garton Ash
BEIJING - President Xi Jinping is leading an extraordinary political experiment in China. In essence, he is trying to turn his nation into an advanced economy and three-dimensional superpower, drawing on the energies of capitalism, patriotism and Chinese traditions, yet all still under the control of what remains, at its core, a Leninist party-state. He may be a Chinese emperor, but he is also a Leninist emperor. This is the most surprising and important political experiment on Earth.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
On Wednesday, conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court continued their project of undermining reasonable attempts by Congress to limit the corrupting influence of money in election campaigns. The same 5-4 majority that lifted limits on corporate political spending in the Citizens United decision struck down long-standing limits on the total amount a citizen can donate during an election cycle. As in Citizens United, the majority held that the restrictions violated 1st Amendment protections for political speech.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By Jessica A. Levinson
Thank you, Supreme Court. Before your decision Wednesday in McCutcheon vs. FEC, Americans were confined to giving a measly total of $48,600 in campaign contributions to federal candidates (enough for about nine candidates) and a total of $74,600 to political action committees. That means individuals were subject to aggregate contributions limits totaling a mere $123,200. Of course, individuals could, and still can, give unlimited sums to independent groups, such as so-called super PACs and other nonprofit corporations.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court's decision to lift the cap on the amount donors can contribute in a congressional election cycle promises to shift power to the political party's established leaders, who had lost ground to outside groups. With the demise of the $123,200 limit for the two-year election cycle, party stalwarts such as House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) will be able to raise multimillion-dollar checks from wealthy contributors for new campaign committees.
OPINION
October 23, 2012
Re "U.S. can't link Libya attack to Al Qaeda," Oct. 20 I'm more than disappointed that we have another intelligence failure to deal with. Our national interests have been ill served by an armed attack that no one saw coming. The loss of a good man, Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, will hurt our efforts in Libya. Worst of all, we have the Republicans playing "gotcha" politics, jumping the shark on every rumor to call President Obama a liar. They've even convinced Mitt Romney, who I believe to be a somewhat honest man, to join in. Will the Republicans pay the price for being so badly wrong?
OPINION
March 17, 2013
Re "Playing ball with AEG," Editorial, March 15 The Times' editorial board cannot control its bias even when writing about a business topic. Regarding the editorial's description of AEG owner Phil Anschutz as "the conservative Denver billionaire," noting Anschutz's political persuasion is completely irrelevant. The fact that some of our less-than-ideal local leaders might have reservations about him because of his politics should be ridiculed. Anschutz has brought much economic benefit to the area.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - Muriel Bowser, a relatively little-known District of Columbia councilwoman, triumphed in Tuesday's Democratic mayoral primary over incumbent Vincent Gray, whose tenure has been tarnished by a corruption scandal. The win most likely means she will be the next mayor in the overwhelmingly Democratic city. Bowser emerged as the front-runner in a field of seven challengers after federal prosecutors tied Gray to an illegal "shadow campaign" that helped him win the mayor's race in 2010.
OPINION
April 2, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Only a decade ago, Christian social conservatives were a commanding force in American politics. They helped elect one of their own, George W. Bush, to two terms. They were a cornerstone of a GOP coalition that appeared to hold a permanent electoral majority. But today, the movement has lost its momentum - in part because one of its assets has become a liability. It used to be that when Republicans wanted to increase conservative voter turnout, all they had to do was put same-sex marriage on the ballot.
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