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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials announced Tuesday that they are temporarily waiving an endangered species protection to enable water managers to send more Northern California water south. The move comes as fishery agencies are under increasing political pressure to take advantage of late winter storms and ramp up pumping from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the center of the state's water distribution system. Mark Cowin, director of the state Department of Water Resources, said the rule suspension would remain in effect for the next week or two and would increase delta exports by as much as 10,000 acre-feet a day. An acre-foot is equivalent to a year's water supply for two households.
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OPINION
March 31, 2014 | By Bill Whalen
Now that the California Senate has voted to suspend three of its members, all accused or convicted of criminal wrongdoing, legislators hope the issue will quickly vanish. And that's precisely the problem with this action. Giving three senators a "time out" - with pay - allows the rest of the members a chance to express outrage, genuine or feigned. However, it doesn't begin to address a larger question: Are these merely three bad apples, or is the larger orchard that is California's Legislature rotten to its core?
OPINION
March 30, 2014
Re "America's dynasty factor," Opinion, March 27 Political dynasties derive from a sense of entitlement and a desire to perpetuate power across generations, often in disregard of their members' qualifications and despite better-qualified candidates outside their circles. As a society that prides itself on its democratic institutions, we should be wary not only of the obvious political dynasties but also less visible forms of nepotism and cronyism, including ties between politicians and lobbyists.
OPINION
March 30, 2014
Re "Sacramento's sickness," Editorial, March 28 Banning state lawmakers from raising money during the Legislature's session is a Band-Aid that would create an uneven playing field, where opponents could raise unlimited funds while an incumbent's hands were tied. It would also make matters worse by driving special interests to fund independent expenditure committees to work on behalf of legislators who were prohibited from accepting contributions. It also is unworkable: A legislator who wanted to run for another office would be unable to amass the funds to do so. And perhaps the worst effect: It would force incumbents into a month of frantic fundraising before ballots are mailed, exactly when they should be attending candidate debates and interacting with voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
Screams rang out Saturday night across the Los Angeles Sports Arena as Taiwanese band Mayday brought its brand of Asian stadium rock to an all-Chinese audience for a show celebrating its 15th anniversary. "We don't usually do anything on our anniversary, but this year, it seems like things are different - because you guys all came," said Chin-Hang Shih, the lead guitarist, to screams and cheers. With matching outfits and a yellow submarine gracing the cover of their press kit, the members of Mayday are sometimes described as the Beatles of Asia.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
A few years ago, I found myself sitting on an airplane next to a gentleman from Egypt. Talk quickly turned to the upheaval in his country, where the so-called Arab Spring was in full bloom. "We want a real democracy," he told me, "not like yours. " When I pressed him to elaborate, he shot back with a question of his own. "How many times have you voted," he asked, "when someone named 'Bush' or 'Clinton' wasn't running?" The answer, I sheepishly admitted, was once: in 2008. Before that - going back to 1980, the first year I cast a ballot - every single presidential ticket featured someone from one of those two families.
OPINION
March 26, 2014 | Doyle McManus
President Obama is scheduled to visit Pope Francis at the Vatican on Thursday, and the meeting will probably take the usual form of encounters between presidents and pontiffs: a polite conversation about their common agenda on poverty and world peace, plus a gentle remonstrance from the Holy Father on abortion and religious liberty. But if Obama and Francis had time to get to know each other, they might each benefit by trading notes on practical politics, as presidents and British prime ministers often do, and on the lessons they can draw from each other's experiences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jonathan Schell, the author, journalist and activist who wrote passionately and cogently about war and politics for more than 40 years, condemning conflicts from Vietnam to Iraq and galvanizing the anti-nuclear movement with his horrifyingly detailed bestseller, "The Fate of the Earth," died Tuesday at his home in New York City. He was 70. The cause was cancer, according to Schell's companion, Irena Gross. With unrelenting rage and idealism, Schell focused on the consequences of violence in essays and books that conveyed a hatred of war rooted in part in his firsthand observations of American military operations in Vietnam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Republican gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari unveiled a jobs plan Tuesday that calls for corporate tax breaks, hydraulic fracturing of some California oil deposits, reduced regulations on business and increased spending on water storage. The 10-point plan, focused on manufacturing, water, energy and the business climate, is the first policy Kashkari has set forth since announcing in January that he would run for office. The former U.S. Treasury official said his plan would "unleash" the private sector, creating hundreds of thousands of jobs.
OPINION
March 25, 2014
Re "Losing an edge in the Capitol," March 18 The bill to expand disclosure of the sources of campaign cash failed in the state Senate because not one Republican would vote for it. This is basically a nonpartisan bill that would force out-of-state big-money donors to tell California voters who they are. Shouldn't we as Californians know who is pumping millions into our state trying to influence our election process? A no-brainer, you say? Obviously not to the Republicans in our state Senate.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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