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Pollination

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
A tiny bee may help save New Zealand's unusual exploding mistletoe by replacing the now-rare birds that used to be the only creatures that could pollinate it, scientists report in the Dec. 19 Nature. The lightweight bees have learned how to wrestle open the flowers of the mistletoe, which cannot open by themselves.
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NEWS
July 1, 1996 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The apple blossoms used to shake and shiver every spring. A loud, insistent buzz thrummed in Bob Barthel's ears when he was a boy, climbing in his father's orchard. He worried in those days about getting stung by the throngs of wild honeybees jostling for nectar in the flowers. Now that he is 39 and managing the farm, Barthel has sharply different concerns. The apple trees were still and silent this year, but he is far from pleased. Growing season has begun.
HOME & GARDEN
May 25, 1996 | MARESA ARCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Barely bigger than a raisin, bees can strike terror in the hardiest adults, sending them into a duck-and-weave dance to elude the little insects. Granted, a sting is an unpleasant sensation that makes many of us disdainful of bees. Plants, on the other hand, will do almost anything to attract bees, such as blooming in the insects' favorite colors and forming a shape to entice the pollinators. Bees are one of nature's most important pollinators.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1996 | DENNIS ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As with vastly more important things, the riots of 1992 had deep psychic effects on L.A. night life, plunging some clubbers into the dark-minded excesses of after-hours drug dens. What better way, then, to ring in a new era than with an upbeat, old-school, hands-in-the-air, whistles-and-glow-sticks rave. It was good to see L.A.'
HOME & GARDEN
April 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
The sight of a hummingbird is such a delight that certain plants are worth growing for the sole purpose of attracting it. Hummingbirds' favorite food is floral nectar. Flowers that yield their nectar to hummingbirds do ask for something in return--that the hummingbirds pollinate the blossoms. Such ornithophilous (bird-pollinated) flowers have little need for insect pollinators, which are attracted to blue flowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1993 | ROBERT POLLIN, Robert Pollin teaches economics at UC Riverside. This article is excerpted from the July 12 issue of the Nation. and
Nothing so clearly demonstrates the Clinton Administration's capacity for getting things wrong on the economy than its apparent decision to make military conversion a footnote to its deficit-cutting agenda. By July 1, the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission will present Bill Clinton with its final recommendations for boarding up military bases across the country.
OPINION
October 4, 1992 | ROBERT POLLIN, Robert Pollin teaches economics at UC Riverside
Ross Perot's program for closing the federal deficit as a means of restoring the country's economic health has already achieved the improbable--it has pulled Perot himself back from disgrace and restored him as a formidable political force. But two miracles are more than one should expect from a single economic program. Perot's plan, and variations thereof being pushed by such figures as Sen. Warren B. Rudman (R-N.H.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1992 | RICK DU BROW
It is one of television's most blatant trends, and it is everywhere. An NBC source calls it the "cross-pollination" of news and entertainment departments. It is deflowering some once-proud bastions of TV news. Sample: On KNBC-TV Channel 4, the 11 p.m. news shamelessly compromises itself by shilling for the upcoming shows of Jay Leno and David Letterman. Sample: NBC cut back its political convention coverage this summer but had Tom Brokaw file witty news reports back to Leno on "The Tonight Show."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1992 | ROBERT POLLIN, Robert Pollin , an associate professor of economics at UC Riverside , is the author of the monograph "Deeper Debt: The Changing Financial Condition of U.S. Households" (1990). and
The dismal economic news--that the unemployment rate rose from 7.5% to 7.8% nationally and from 8.7% to 9.8% in California between May and June, and that the state is now reduced to issuing IOUs--makes clear that recovery from the recession has been stalled, if not reversed. This recession, which began in July, 1990, was already the longest of the post-World War II period. Without dramatic policy actions to reverse the current trends, it will almost surely stretch into a third year.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gloomy skies over Ventura County can often hinder more than just a sun worshiper's chance to enjoy a day at the beach. For farmers, those humdrum days can sometimes pose big problems. Such is the case for the local avocado industry. When a warming sun failed to burn through a pall of gray last spring, many tiny would-be blossoms were never coaxed into opening, the first step in the avocado's 14-month-long growth process.
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