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Pollution Control Equipment

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NEWS
March 6, 1985 | Associated Press
General Motors Corp. is recalling 290,000 Cadillacs to fix potentially defective pollution control equipment, the Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday. The vehicles being recalled are 1981 and 1982 Cadillac DeVille, Brougham, Fleetwood, Eldorado and Seville models equipped with the 4.1-liter V-8 gasoline engine.
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BUSINESS
October 4, 2006 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
A small California company that makes sure businesses don't cry over their spilled milk -- or whatever mess might need cleaning up -- is trying to make some green from going green. In a typical week, Advanced Cleanup Technologies Inc. fields about 30 calls for emergency spill cleanup -- soaking up a flood of milk from a delivery tanker before it can clog the gills of fish living in a nearby stream, for example.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1993
Santa Ana-based Wahlco Environmental Systems Inc. said it received $7 million in contracts to supply its pollution control equipment to several electric utilities. Electric Energy, a utility in Jappa, Ill., awarded Wahlco a $2-million contract to provide flue gas conditioning systems. The work is expected to begin in October. The other customers were not identified. The systems clean out smokestacks and improve the efficiency of industrial boilers.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2003 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
Cormetech Inc.'s state-of-the-art manufacturing plant makes big pollution-control devices that clean millions of tons of smog-producing nitrogen oxides from the smoke that billows out of power plants. But on Friday, like all Fridays these days, most of the factory's machines were still. Since June, the Durham-based company has cut its workforce and production by more than half and shrunk its workweek from seven days to three or four. Business is very slow for companies like Cormetech.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1992
Wahlco Environmental Systems Inc., which provides pollution control equipment to electric power plants, said three presidents of Wahlco units had resigned to "pursue other activities." Wahlco said Lothar Bachmann, president of Bachmann Cos.; Ekkehard Bachmann, president of Bachmann Industries Canada Inc., and Holly Bachmann, president of Bachmann F.H.E. Inc., had agreed to continue in their jobs in 1990 when the companies were bought by Wahlco.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1993 | Susan Christian, Times staff writer
A year ago, Thomas and Barbara Morris thought they had no choice but to shut down their Newport Beach dry-cleaning business. The cost of updating their machinery at Newport Cleaners to meet federal and state environmental standards seemed prohibitive. Then the couple heard about a pilot program offered by the state through which small businesses can obtain low-interest loans to install pollution-control equipment.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
First there were corn and wheat futures contracts, and later came interest-rate swaps and other fancy financial instruments. But now the world's largest commodity exchange is developing one of its most exotic new investments yet: air pollution permits. "It's a totally new animal," said Michael O'Connell, a spokesman for the Chicago Board of Trade. The CBOT on Tuesday voted to create a new futures contract that allows investors and utilities to trade rights to emit sulfur dioxide.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2003 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
Cormetech Inc.'s state-of-the-art manufacturing plant makes big pollution-control devices that clean millions of tons of smog-producing nitrogen oxides from the smoke that billows out of power plants. But on Friday, like all Fridays these days, most of the factory's machines were still. Since June, the Durham-based company has cut its workforce and production by more than half and shrunk its workweek from seven days to three or four. Business is very slow for companies like Cormetech.
NEWS
June 13, 1992
Nature as Chemistry Lab Biodiversity has a major role in medicine, experts say. And without habitat protection, many valuable plants could disappear before their value is determined, according to biologists. Mark Plotkin of Conservation International said half of America's drugs are derived from natural substances. "Some of the hottest anti-viral drugs come from tropical plants," Plotkin said. Crime Drops as Troops Stand Guard They said it couldn't be done.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that could mark the emergence of a new wave of environmental litigation, an Irvine printing company has filed a federal racketeering lawsuit against one of its competitors, alleging that the firm has gained a competitive advantage by operating in flagrant violation of air pollution laws. SCS Printing Inc., in a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, charges that Trend Offset Printing Services Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2002 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move criticized by environmentalists but welcomed by restaurant owners, Laguna Beach officials have backpedaled on an ambitious plan that would have required eateries to install underground grease disposals. The City Council unanimously passed a grease-control ordinance Tuesday night that drops an earlier plan to require so-called interceptors at all restaurants, opting instead to develop comprehensive training, inspection and enforcement policies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to reduce beach pollution, several Southern California coastal cities are exploring whether restaurants should be forced to install costly systems to dispose of cooking grease. But restaurateurs and public officials said there isn't enough room in some seaside business districts to bury the bulky collection tanks. And with installation costs that could reach $50,000, many mom-and-pop operations said, they cannot afford the expense without government assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Texaco Inc. has agreed to outfit two Central Valley oil fields with air pollution control devices and pay $568,000 for removing the equipment in the first place, the federal government announced. Texaco ran 720 oil wells without permit at the company's Kern River Oil Field and removed vapor recovery equipment from 5,030 wells, the Justice Department said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Next to a stream of unidentifiable white goop seeping into the Los Angeles River, city and state officials Thursday announced a $1.4-million project to clean up two of the city's worst storm drains--the ones serving skid row. The drains that empty at 6th and 8th streets collect runoff from a 1,000-acre area of downtown Los Angeles where numerous food processors and more than 3,000 homeless people are the main polluters, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2000
To help clean up the harbor's air pollution, a major cargo terminal in the Port of Los Angeles has begun using five propane-powered trucks to move shipping containers around its facility. Marine Terminals Corp., which operates the Evergreen America Corp. terminal, put the low-emission trucks into service under a state program that provides economic incentives for the operators of diesel vehicles to reduce air pollution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In vintage whodunit fashion, myriad suspects have been examined and accusations leveled to find a cause for mysteriously high bacteria levels that contaminated Huntington Beach shores a year ago today, heralding a summer of gloom for the tourist mecca.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Companies that make pollution control devices for cars and industry are among the predictable winners under the proposed clean air legislation that cleared a House-Senate conference Monday. The losers include auto makers, oil companies and producers of high-sulfur coal. But winners and losers alike were generally relieved that U.S. companies affected by the legislation can now get on with their business plans, since Congressional passage and a signature by President Bush are near-certainties.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1993 | JILL BETTNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Advanced Development Co., the 677-acre complex here known as the Skunk Works, gave the media a peek last week at part of the place: a new, $30-million parts plant that Lockheed boasts is one of the most environmentally safe facilities of its kind in the country. The plant, which opens next month, will fabricate, prepare and paint metal aircraft parts, including those needed to make modifications to the Lockheed-built F-117 stealth fighter and updating of the old U-2 spy plane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2000 | Sharon Nagy, (949) 248-2168
The city will monitor the effectiveness of three newly installed storm drain filters for several months before deciding whether to expand the program. The filters were installed this month along Forest Avenue to catch runoff before it flows into the ocean. The filters soak up oil and grease while allowing water to pass through.
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