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Pollution Control

BUSINESS
October 22, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside a nondescript office building in Irvine, Energy and Environmental Research Corp. engineers putter about a cavernous laboratory, fiddling with an angular, tube-filled, 10-foot-high plexiglass model. They watch closely as smoke- and helium-filled bubbles swirl through the structure, mimicking the behavior of gases inside a power-plant boiler and yielding valuable clues to the mysteries of pollution formation. Similar work is under way in office parks across Southern California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2003 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
State officials are poised to approve a new master plan for combating smog across Southern California, even though they concede that the strategy probably falls short of what would be needed to achieve clean air. The plan comes at a time when Los Angeles' half-century fight against air pollution has taken a turn for the worse. After 30 years of dramatic gains, progress appears to have stalled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Wilson Administration has unveiled the first details of its plan to create a California Environmental Protection Agency, which would regulate air and water pollution, control garbage and toxic waste disposal, and evaluate threats to the environment. The proposal calls for placing a number of existing state environmental programs under a single agency, headed by a Cabinet-level secretary.
OPINION
September 21, 2003
Californians care about clearing the still-smoggy skies and protecting the state's 1,100-mile oceanfront from oil spills and urban runoff. For that reason, and because the problem of pollution has been more acute in California than elsewhere, the Legislature and state and local agencies have led most other states in innovative, forceful efforts to improve air and water quality. The Bush administration's response? See you in court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1991 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Long Beach herb processing company has agreed to pay $500,000 in civil fines for allegedly dumping thousands of pounds of toxic gas into the air and failing to warn as many as 50,000 residents who may have been exposed to the cancer-causing emissions, state prosecutors said Monday.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | MICHAEL WEISSKOPF, THE WASHINGTON POST
Josh Margolis is pushing hard to close the deal. Working the telephone, he talks prices, wheedles a bit, pitching his product like a broker of pork bellies or penny stocks. Except the product Margolis peddles is more unusual than those--it's a license to pollute the atmosphere.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Parker Automotive Corp. said Thursday said that it and TRW International have signed a distributorship agreement with a West German company that guarantees the sale of at least $2 million worth of Parker's products in Hungary. The pact names S&B Enterprises of Reilengen, West Germany, as the exclusive distributor for Parker's CarbonClean products in Hungary. The distributor will market and service the products for five years, with the option to renew the contract.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2008 | WASHINGTON POST
The Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday abandoned its push to revise two air pollution rules in ways that environmentalists had long opposed, abruptly dropping measures that the Bush administration had spent years preparing. One proposal would have made it easier to build a coal-fired power plant, refinery or factory near a national park. The other would have altered the rules that govern when power plants must install antipollution devices.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2002 | From Associated Press
A power company finalized a deal Tuesday to buy most of an Ohio River village where many residents say they are happy to get away from what they say is a polluting coal plant. The deal will all but empty Cheshire of its 221 residents, although about a dozen holdouts have refused to sell. "All along, we've hoped that the ones who wanted to stay would be allowed to stay, and that's what will happen," Mayor Tom Reese said. "But the majority of people wanted to sell."
NEWS
February 2, 1994 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, grappling with what it called "the hard part" of water pollution control, on Tuesday unveiled a series of initiatives designed to improve the quality of the nation's waterways. In its broadest terms, the plan would streamline regulations, increase federal funds available to towns and cities and reduce the use of some toxic pollutants, such as chlorine, by American industry.
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