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NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - As part of his effort to plug leaks, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is considering a proposal to force intelligence agency employees to answer a direct question in their polygraph examinations about whether they have disclosed information to reporters, according to officials familiar with the matter. Government officials who seek top-secret clearances are subject to an initial polygraph test and periodic renewals, in many cases every five years. Currently, they are asked whether they have ever disclosed classified information to someone not authorized to receive it.  But they are not specifically asked about contacts with the news media.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
Chase Merritt, the business partner and friend of Joseph McStay, gave an interview to a British tabloid newspaper, saying that he wanted to speak out to help catch the McStay family's killer. The McStay family vanished without a trace in 2010. Their remains were discovered last week and San Bernardino County Sheriff's officials said the family had been killed.  Merritt told the Daily Mail  he spent more than an hour with McStay the day he and his family went missing from their home in suburban San Diego County . Merritt, who said he was also the last person McStay called from his cellphone, said he does not know anything that could help solve the family's disappearance.
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NEWS
May 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Former White House volunteer Kathleen Willey passed a polygraph examination in September 1998 in which she said President Clinton had touched her breasts and placed her hand on his groin, according to documents unsealed in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va. However, Willey was asked only if the touching occurred, not whether the alleged Nov. 29, 1993, encounter with the president was consensual or, as she alleges, against her will. The Sept. 15 test was Willey's second polygraph.
SPORTS
October 15, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
It didn't take long for legal proceedings between Albert Pujols and Jack Clark to get ugly, as an attorney representing Clark accused Pujols of using a false name and challenged the Angels slugger to tale a polygraph test to determine if Pujols is telling the truth when he claims he never used performance-enhancing drugs. Pujols' attorney deemed the request for a polygraph “ridiculous” and, in an email, said it was “an absurd publicity ploy by a lawyer known for his hyperbole.” Pujols filed a defamation suit in Missouri on Oct. 4 over Clark's early August accusation on a radio show that Pujols used PEDs.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
When federal judges allow testimony on the results of lie detector tests, they risk the possibility of reversal because higher courts--especially the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals--have set narrow boundaries under which such evidence can be used. In the case of former FBI Agent Richard Miller, whose conviction for spying was overturned Tuesday, the 9th Circuit Court ruled that U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon erred by allowing "extensive" testimony about Miller's polygraph examination, which he failed, thus exposing the jury to the "full prejudicial impact" of the lie detector results.
NEWS
August 29, 1986 | Associated Press
Adolph Coors Co. plans to stop its controversial use of lie detectors to screen job applicants, switching to other screening methods starting Monday, a newspaper reported Thursday. The Denver Post said that the brewing company, which has more than 10,000 employees nationwide, has been looking for alternatives to the polygraph since Congress began considering a variety of bills that would curb use of lie detectors in work-place screening. "If people are on narcotics we'll find it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1986
I have a suggestion for getting to the bottom of the Iran arms-contra scandal. President Reagan and all his Cabinet members should take polygraph examinations and tell everything they know about the situation. The President has frequently expressed his enthusiasm for the polygraph as a fact-finding tool, particularly in cases involving national security. The current scandal presents a perfect opportunity for Mr. Reagan to demonstrate his faith in the machine. JANET R. BENDER Somerset, Pa.
OPINION
May 16, 1999
Re "Suspected Spy Faced Inquiry 15 Years Ago," May 6: First, the FBI never tells the New Mexico lab or the Energy Department that Wen Ho Lee failed a polygraph test. When in a review of Lee's top-secret "Q" rating the information about the polygraph is discovered, it was sent to the Energy Department and was subsequently lost. The information that the FBI investigation would not be jeopardized if Lee's security clearance was lifted, or if he were transferred, was not passed on to officials at the Los Alamos lab. Did you ever wonder what happened to the Keystone Kops of silent movie fame?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1986
Along with mandatory drug testing, I think that we should also have the Army search all private homes for unregistered firearms. We should begin with National Rifle Assn. members. Then we should have random administration of polygraph examinations to determine if anyone is hiding anything. It's a foolproof way to uncover lawbreakers. And as long as we're at it, we ought to give Reagan, his Cabinet and the Congress an IQ test, although I suspect none of them are hiding any intelligence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1986
Your editorial (Dec. 20), "Honor and Dishonor," was really simplistic and off the mark. You state that lie detector tests are unreliable, and that the mind-set underlying the President's order to administer them is shabby and squalid, and then you conclude that the government is reckless to employ the polygraph and forfeits the respect of decent citizens. Poppycock. Hasn't the country been badly served by government employees who recklessly release sensitive if not confidential pieces of information?
SPORTS
October 9, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Lois Ann Goodman, the tennis judge arrested the day before this year's U.S. Open and charged in her husband's death, has passed a polygraph test in which she denied bludgeoning him with a coffee cup. Goodman's attorneys told Associated Press that they have emailed the results to the district attorney's office and want prosecutors to consider dismissing charges against the 70-year-old woman. “I'm hopeful that they are going to reassess their case,” Alison Triessl, one of Goodman's attorneys, said in a phone interview with Associated Press.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - As part of his effort to plug leaks, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is considering a proposal to force intelligence agency employees to answer a direct question in their polygraph examinations about whether they have disclosed information to reporters, according to officials familiar with the matter. Government officials who seek top-secret clearances are subject to an initial polygraph test and periodic renewals, in many cases every five years. Currently, they are asked whether they have ever disclosed classified information to someone not authorized to receive it.  But they are not specifically asked about contacts with the news media.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2010 | By Seema Mehta and Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Meg Whitman launched a forceful effort Thursday to regain control of her campaign for governor, pledging to take a lie detector test if necessary to prove that she and her husband were unaware they had employed an illegal immigrant housekeeper for nine years until the woman confessed her status in 2009. "If it comes to that, absolutely," she said at a hastily called news conference in Santa Monica, her husband, Griff Harsh, at her side. "Absolutely, because we were stunned. " But Whitman's lengthy defense was undercut by the second in a dramatic duel of widely broadcast news conferences as the housekeeper's attorney, Gloria Allred, produced a copy of a government letter sent six years before Nicandra Diaz Santillan was fired alerting the couple to potential problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2007 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Chris Gugas built a career on one simple human foible: the tendency to lie. A polygraph expert, Gugas spent decades ferreting out the truth using a lie detector test. The tests he administered helped confirm the sins of the guilty, and helped free the falsely accused. In the business world, the polygraph steered employers away from job candidates who were likely to embezzle or engage in other misdeeds. Gugas' faith in the test was unshakable. "Polygraph is not perfect; it can never be perfect.
NATIONAL
September 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A judge halted the scheduled Thursday execution of double-murder convict Joseph Lave after the district attorney's office found a polygraph test that the defense had requested for years. The test, administered to a codefendant, reflects on the man's credibility, said Mike Ware, of the conviction integrity unit of the Dallas County district attorney's office. The two previous district attorneys apparently failed to turn it over, Ware said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2007 | Joshua Goodman, Associated Press
BOGOTA, Colombia -- Have you ever cheated on your spouse? Stolen money from your boss? Do you consider yourself a better person than your mother-in-law? Coming soon to U.S. television is a game show that has taken Colombia by storm. Similar productions are being sped up in Brazil, France and Britain. The concept: Watch people squirm while they're being interrogated.
SPORTS
June 2, 1989 | PAUL McLEOD, Times Staff Writer
The Ben Johnson steroid controversy, unfolding daily in Canada, has focused an international spotlight on drug testing. Yet how many people know what a test for banned substances consists of? Even some of the contestants for Saturday's Southern California Natural Body Building Championships at the Aviation Center in Redondo Beach weren't all that sure what to expect of their mandatory tests. At worst, most thought they would be asked to give blood or urine samples. Neither would do, according to promoter Pete Samra, the 1980 Natural Mr. USA. Samra, once a steroid user, chose the polygraph.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1985 | LINDA DEUTSCH, Associated Press
After five days of tough interrogation and lie detector tests, Richard Miller finally admitted that he had shown the Soviet Union classified material found at his home, an FBI polygraph expert testified Thursday in the former agent's Los Angeles federal court trial. James Murphy said Miller, the first FBI agent ever charged with espionage, made the damaging comments after days of insisting that he had done nothing wrong.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2006 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
Despite the CIA's goal of cracking down on leaks of classified information, the government may forgo criminal charges against a senior agency officer fired last week for disclosing operational secrets, according to current and former intelligence and law enforcement officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2005 | David Rosenzweig, Times Staff Writer
Former public relations executive Douglas R. Dowie will not be allowed to introduce the results of a privately administered polygraph test at his upcoming trial on charges of padding bills to the Department of Water and Power, a federal judge has ruled. U.S. District Judge Gary A. Feess said that if Dowie "wants to present his side ... he is free to do so by taking the stand and testifying at trial, at which time he will be subject like all other witnesses to cross-examination."
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